2

This sentence is from a novel published in 1960: 'On fit confidence à Piet, avec insistance, de ce qu'il existait un antisémitisme local.' How can that 'de ce que' be explained grammatically?

2 Answers 2

2

On fit confidence à Piet, avec insistance, de ce qu'il existait un antisémitisme local.

That sentence uses a couple of formal and literary constructions.

  1. Faire confidence: The lack of article is very outdated. In contemporary French, that can be faire une confidence, mettre dans la confidence or one of the various verbs confier, avouer, révéler, dévoiler...

Avec insistance, on révéla à Piet qu'il existait un antisémitisme local.

  1. With faire confidence, the required preposition is de (that is: faire confidence de quelque chose à quelqu'un).

    What might have been possible is:

On fit confidence à Piet, avec insistance, de l'existence d'un antisémitisme local.

but because the author wanted to use a conjugated verb, the choice was indeed de ce qu'il existait.

The very same de ce que can be found in more common contexts, like:

Ils profitent de la gratuité du vaccin.

Ils profitent de ce que le vaccin est gratuit.

1

On trouve parfois cette construction.

  • (TLFi) Recevoir, avoir avis de qqc., avoir avis de ce que

  • (TLFi) aviser qqn que, aviser qqn de ce que;

  • (TLFi) Loc. fig. (Se plaindre de ce que) la mariée est trop belle.

"Ce que" can be replaced by "du fait que", which is in fact "de le fait que" (but not idiomatic); the determination and/or the referent comes in cataphorically in the text.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.