1

I'd like to know which of these are legitimate translations of "it's been cloudy for a week":

il y a des nuages depuis une semaine
le ciel est nuageux depuis une semaine
c'est nuageux depuis une semaine
le temps est nuageux depuis une semaine

Are there any other common ways of saying this that I've missed, and what would tend to be the most common way of expressing this intended meaning?

Thanks!

7
  • "It's been" + a period of time = "Cela fait une semaine que le ciel est nuageux, par exemple.
    – Lambie
    Nov 6 '21 at 14:02
  • @Lambie That's what the OP will see in the linked question, you don't agree it's a duplicate?
    – None
    Nov 6 '21 at 14:05
  • @Lambie Come on! It doesn't make any difference, the question is not about negative or not negative.
    – None
    Nov 6 '21 at 14:09
  • The problem is that that answer provides every possibility when in fact I think the most common way of saying this from the English "it's been" some period of time is *only: Cela fait* and not all the others. So, it really is not a duplicate, in that sense. And that is the entire specific answer to this question and what the OP didn't know.
    – Lambie
    Nov 6 '21 at 14:12
  • 1
    @Lambie They can all be used for expressing "it's been + perfect" some might be preferred according to context but OP isn't giving context. Moreover the linked answer says "So the perfectly popular spoken sentence would be "Ça fait deux ans ...". ( Cela is mentioned as written style which is perfectly correct).
    – None
    Nov 6 '21 at 14:22
0

il y a des nuages depuis une semaine (there have been clouds for a week)

le ciel est nuageux depuis une semaine (the sky has been cloudy for a week)

le temps est nuageux depuis une semaine (the weather has been cloudy for a week)

Therefore, c'est nuageux depuis une semaine is your most accurate translation. As for the different options, they're all natural and correct, so pick your favorite.

0

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.