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  1. I know that Wiktionnaire can be unreliable, but is it correct? I can translate the quotation in question — very rare change in this sense, but more au courant in the other.

  2. Mais lequel est "ce sens" ?

  3. Lequel est "l’autre" sens?

  4. Pourquoi le "changement très rare dans ce sens, mais plus courant dans l’autre"?

morigéner — Wiktionnaire

Étymologie

Du latin morigerari (« être docile »). De mos (« usage, coutume, mœurs »), et gerere (« porter »), par le biais d’un changement du r en n (changement très rare dans ce sens, mais plus courant dans l’autre)

CNRTL doesn't appear to even bring this up, let alone expound it.

Étymol. et Hist. 1. a) Ca 1270 bien moriginé «bien élevé» (Grandes chroniques de France, éd. J. Viard, t.2, p.215); ca 1350 morigené (Gilles Li Muisis, Poésies, I, 155 ds T.-L.); b) ca 1485 moriginer trans. «élever» (Myst. du V. Testament, éd. J. de Rothschild, 26599); 1671 morigéner (Molière, Les Fourberies de Scapin, II, 1); 2. 1718 «réprimander, sermonner» (Ac.). Empr. au lat. médiév. moriginatus, morigenatus «complaisant, docile» (Latham; Du Cange; Blaise Latin. Med. Aev.), altération du lat. class. morigeratus, morigerari «(être) complaisant pour (essayer de plaire à quelqu'un)». Morigeratus a été empr. dès 1216 (Anger, Trad. vie S. Grégoire, 709 ds T.-L.: morigerat). Morigenatus a pris le sens de «rendu docile, éduqué» sous l'infl. de morigerus «complaisant, docile, soumis».

2
  • The wiktionary says the r in the Latin morigerari has evolved into an n in French and that it is more common to see the reverse, i.e. n evolving into r. I am not knowledgeable enough in the field of historical phonetics to expand on that (if you get no answer here, you could try Lingusitics). All I know is that a lot of Roman languages (e.g. Italian, Occitan) have retained the Latin r.
    – None
    Nov 7 '21 at 12:50
  • TLF does mention that r became n (it mentions morigeratus, morigerari) but the TLF is only meant to state historical evolutions not to explain them.
    – None
    Nov 7 '21 at 12:50
-1

Here ´ce sens’ is only the change of letter r to letter n direction in the orthography of word that comes from Latin word ´gerere ´. Few times it changed from r to n. More often it changes from n to r. This is not useful to understand the word. BTW , The word morigerer is not defined in French Academy dictionary which is the reference for French even if it scan get time for a word to be included in it.

Morigéner in French Academy Dictionary

Morigéner in French Larousse dictionary

4
  • Morigerer (or even morigérer) cannot not found in any French dictionary because it doesn't exist, so it's not likely to appear in the Dictionnaire de l'Académie. Over the centuries we can find extremely few occurrences of the word in seemingly not very reliable writings in French and which are misspellings most likely influenced by Occitan or Italian (or other Roman languages having the word).
    – None
    Nov 7 '21 at 12:22
  • Added references to definition of both terms . Larousse dictionary is kind of a reference in France for current language.
    – Ptit Xav
    Nov 7 '21 at 13:57
  • The OP is not asking for a definition of morigéner, since they are already linking to one. But I think you should explain this sentence "The word morigerer is not defined in French Academy dictionary which is the reference for French even if it scan get time for a word to be included in it."
    – None
    Nov 7 '21 at 14:05
  • This was just more information.
    – Ptit Xav
    Nov 7 '21 at 14:35

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