1

Example:

Est-ce quelqu'un qui vous rendre un service ?

vs.

C'est quelqu'un qui vous rendre un service ?

1
  • Hi, I meant "lend a hand" in English. Rendre service is what I meant - thank you & apologies for the direct spanish-french translation. I have modified the question accordingly. Jan 19 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

4

Both work fine as questions but I'd like to point out that it is not because you are using C'est the same way as Est-ce. It's just the way you phrase it I'm objecting to, for grammar's sake.

You can ask a question:

  • Just by adding a question mark to the affirmative sentence (and when speaking the intonation differs):
    C'est quelqu'un qui vous prête un service ?

  • By having the subject before the verb:
    Est-ce quelqu'un qui vous prête un service ?
    (ce stands for c', no elision possible here)

Another question could have been:

  • Est-ce que c'est quelqu'un qui vous prête un service ?
    Where you just add est-ce que in front of the affirmative sentence. Which is very frequent in oral speech, you can write it too, it's just less formal than the inversion.

Prêter un service is not very clear and that's probably not what you mean. You might mean rendre service (do a favour/lend a hand) or proposer/fournir un service (provide a service).


Edit after OP's comment:

  • C'est quelqu'un qui vous rend (un) service ?
  • Est-ce quelqu'un qui vous rend (un) service ?
  • Est-ce que c'est quelqu'un qui vous rend (un) service ?
1
  • Are you more likely to say prêter un service over rendre (un) service in Québecois? This is just a simple question. [I do not need snark from other posters].
    – Lambie
    Jan 31 at 15:33
1

« Est-ce quelqu’un qui vous rend service ? » c’est écrit dans un style formel alors que « C’est quelqu’un… ? » est dans un style familier.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.