8

It has been stated many times on the Internet that French doesn't have a word for 'cheap', but what do you do when you don't want to say that someone is 'greedy' but still they have problems with money?

For example, there's Bernie Madoff and Gordon Gecko in one corner and then there's your uncle's friend who doesn't want to buy his first date a cup of coffee. Clearly, Madoff is greedy but to say that my uncle's friend is worthy of the same property is too much. Aside from 'avaricieux', I've looked at 'radins, pingres, grippe et rapiat' and native speakers have all confirmed that they are extremely negative and just as bad as 'avaricieux'. Also, 'économe' was proposed but that means 'frugal', not 'cheap'. A frugal person wisely spends their money. A cheap person refuses to be generous in situations where is socially normal to be generous.

9
  • 1
    Are you looking of the noun of someone who barely manage to live with meager earnings? In French, it would be "quelqu'un qui vit chichement". But, I don't see any single word corresponding to this definition and not saying that the person is "près de ses sous", i.e. cautious with money [with pejorative connotation].
    – Graffito
    Jul 7, 2023 at 0:06
  • 1
    greedy describes someone loving money, trying to accumulate as much as possible. French equivalent is cupide. While avare, radin, pingre mean people trying spend as little money as possible. It seems english has no widespread equivalent for radin.
    – XouDo
    Jul 7, 2023 at 8:53
  • 2
    I don't agree that "radins, pingres, grippe et rapiat' [...] are extremely negative". "Cheap" is pejorative but not extremely, and so is radin. It's used for everyday "greed" like someone who never tips, but it's not comparable to billionaire-level Bernie Madoff greed. Jul 7, 2023 at 13:34
  • 2
    @XouDo I agree that OP's question rests on false premise. All the words he refuses to use are different possible translations of 'cheap' (lacking generosity) and none of them is a translation of 'greedy' (wanting more).
    – Jemox
    Jul 7, 2023 at 13:41
  • I have an ongoing argument with someone about whether "frugal" is positive, neutral, or negative. I see it similarly to how you do, but when she uses it, she clearly means "miserly". I've concluded that where one places it on the scale is correlated with how you view the behaviour — whether to deny yourself a pleasure in order to save money is a virtue or not.
    – Luke Sawczak
    Jul 7, 2023 at 14:10

8 Answers 8

23

The most common word I can think of is radin. It can be used as an adjective or as a noun.

Martine est tellement radine qu'elle n'a rien donné pour le départ en retraite de sa collègue préférée. (Wordreference)

Avare and pingre are two synonyms you'll find in dictionaries, but I rarely hear them in day-to-day speech.

11
  • L'idée dans « cheap » n'est pas tant celle de se restreindre personnellement que celle de manquer de générosité, ce qui est la raison pour laquelle l'OP rejette le terme « radin » et d'autres termes similaires.
    – LPH
    Jul 7, 2023 at 12:30
  • 1
    Nice word, and it does seem it can mean « manquer de générosité ». I learned it from « Nicolas » (« La valeur de l'argent ») lorsqu'il reçoit un billet de dix francs. – Tu devrais acheter un ballon de foot, pour qu’on puisse tous y jouer, m’a dit Rufus. – Tu rigoles, j’ai dit. Le billet, il est à moi, je vais pas acheter des choses pour les autres. D’abord, t’avais qu’à faire quatrième en histoire si tu voulais jouer au foot. – T’es un radin, m’a dit Rufus.
    – Luke Sawczak
    Jul 7, 2023 at 14:07
  • 5
    @LPH OP rejette radin sur base de : on lui a dit que c'était "extrêmement péjoratif", ce qui n'est pas le cas selon moi. J'ai mis un commentaire dans ce sens. Jul 7, 2023 at 15:40
  • 1
    @LPH Que la réponse de Teleporting Goat ait eu 12 votes positifs (dont le mien) ajoute certainement quelque chose à ma réponse.
    – jlliagre
    Jul 8, 2023 at 23:21
  • 1
    @LPH radin veut, bien évidement, aussi dire "manquer de générosité"
    – njzk2
    Jul 9, 2023 at 17:47
11

Avaricieux is very outdated. It is almost only heard it in the famous Molière's quote La peste soit de l'avarice et des avaricieux.

From your explanation about the meaning of cheap, I would say mesquin and radin are is the closest. If you believe for some reason it still too strong, you might prefer the softer Il est près de ses sous.

7
  • 5
    C'est une vraie pince. Il a des oursins dans le portefeuille.
    – XouDo
    Jul 7, 2023 at 8:38
  • 1
    @XouDo Pince est aussi un mot que j'entends (et dis) souvent, j'ai hésité à le mettre dans ma réponse mais il était un peu trop argotique ^^ Jul 7, 2023 at 9:49
  • 1
    @TeleportingGoat Aussi rat, et à Marseille raspi, ratchou, raspias...
    – jlliagre
    Jul 7, 2023 at 12:01
  • 1
    Près de ses sous et chiche sont pas mal aussi pour parler de son oncle qui n'est pas un escroc tel que Madoff ou Gordon Gecko.
    – Frank
    Jul 7, 2023 at 13:44
  • 1
    @Frank Oui, j'ai déjà mis près de ses sous. Je n'ai pas mis chiche parce que je l'utilise pas et n'ai pas l'habitude de l'entendre avec ce sens.
    – jlliagre
    Jul 7, 2023 at 20:43
5

In what French? In North America, a near perfect translation (translations will never be perfect) is "Il est gratteux." Few people will get the sense of it in Europe, however. (For example, you will not find this definition in the French Larousse dictionary.)

5
  • 3
    "In what French" is a really interesting question, considering that even within France or its surrounding countries, there are dialects which I am also unaware of, according by some of my acquaintances using expressions I have never heard before.
    – Clockwork
    Jul 7, 2023 at 22:07
  • Tu peux cependant citer Usito : usito.usherbrooke.ca/d%C3%A9finitions/gratteux Jul 8, 2023 at 0:25
  • 1
    @Clockwork Oui, il faut garder à l'esprit que la Francophonie est vaste et s'étend bien au-delà de son petit village dont on voit fumer la cheminée :-)
    – Frank
    Jul 8, 2023 at 9:02
  • 1
    "Cheap" and "Gratteux" sont les deux mots que j'entends au quebec. Jul 9, 2023 at 14:10
  • 1
    @Frank (applaudissements :) Et oui, et lorsque j'avais dit la même chose, il y un bon bout de temps, on m'est tombé[es],[s] dessus.
    – Lambie
    Jul 10, 2023 at 13:55
3

I think "radin" is a good word for this situation, it's not archaic and it's negative but not too insulting.

You could also use not a word but a longer sentence, like "Il a vraiment des oursins dans les poches" (litt. he really has sea urchins in his pockets).

3

The French word I found which was closest to my understanding of the English word "cheap" is chiche, which you usually don't hear nowadays.

According to Larousse:

Qui répugne à dépenser ce qu'il faudrait ; trop parcimonieux.

Basically, when you say about a man that "ce monsieur est chiche", there is a negative connotation to it, but not as much as when you call him "radin".

Someone is "radin" when they don't want to spend anything whatsoever, whereas someone who is "chiche" is reluctant in spending.

2
  • 2
    I come from DRC, where we have a huge French influence, and we use Chiche a lot. We even use it in Swahili to mean the same thing. Jul 8, 2023 at 10:48
  • 1
    @EspoirMurhabazi En France, on utilise parfois "t'es pas chiche!" pour lancer un défi - un autre emploi.
    – Frank
    Jul 8, 2023 at 12:20
2

To complete jlliagre's answer :

  • Avaricieux is effectively outdated, and has been replaced by Avare. It actually is the title of a comedy written by Molière, in which a rich but greedy character is named Harpagon. It has given the french expression un harpagon to define someone cheap. It is however still pretty strong.
  • If you are looking for a less negative word, I would suggest parcimonieux/parcimonieuse. The noun parcimonie meaning cautiousness (i.e. LPH's used definition of mesquin), the expression literally means "cautious with expenses". (Edit : it may be recommended to precise in which way i.e. "une économie parcimonieuse", "des dépenses parcimonieuses" or "il est parcimonieux quant à ses dépenses". But if the context is settled, I believe you can describe the person as such, here is an example : A : "Pourquoi ne paie-t-il pas le café ?" B :"Parce qu'il est trop parcimonieux.").
7
  • 1
    Mais si on dit que quelqu'un est parcimonieux, il faut spécifier dans quel domaine, les questions d'argent ne sont pas automatiquement impliquées par parcimonie.
    – Frank
    Jul 7, 2023 at 10:01
  • 1
    parcimonie (TLFi) : A. − Épargne minutieuse, parfois mesquine, qui s'exerce sur des petites choses, en partic., dans l'économie domestique. // Il ne faut pas ajouter « quant à ses dépenses », c'est redondant. On peut préciser un type de dépense (ses dépenses domestiques, ses dépenses de voyage, ses dépenses d'entretient de la propriété, etc.). Il n'est pas non plus nécessaire de spécifier ce à quoi s'applique la parcimonie si elle est appliquée généralement (« -Elle est parcimonieuse , mesquine . C'est une avaricieuse , — Exercises de conversation française - Rozario Du Tailly »).
    – LPH
    Jul 7, 2023 at 11:41
  • 3
    An issue with parcimonieux is about its register. It's not at all the same as the one of "cheap".
    – jlliagre
    Jul 7, 2023 at 12:04
  • 2
    C'est exactement ça ; « il est parcimonieux de son temps », par exemple.
    – LPH
    Jul 7, 2023 at 12:05
  • 1
    @Marck Bien sûr qu'on le peut, et non, parcimonieux n'évoque pas nécessairement l'argent: "épargne", et "économie domestique" sont à prendre dans un sens plus général, et "petites choses" indique bien qu'il ne s'agit pas forcèment d'argent. Oui, parcimonieux est plus général qu'avaricieux. D'où le besoin de spécifier s'il s'agit d'argent.
    – Frank
    Jul 7, 2023 at 12:05
1

I would vote for radin based on your example.

A somewhat outdated but nevertheless interesting expression is 'avoir les poches cousues'. To fully appreciate it, you have to imagine not that the pockets are fully sewn but only partially and at one end of the opening. As a consequence, you can still put your hand in your pocket, grab a few coins but once your hand is closed, you 'unfortunately' can't pull it out.

The person who taught me this expression referred to his uncle Richard (literally 'wealthy') who had asked his wife to sew his pockets. When asked for an offering at church, he would put his hand into his pocket and appear sorry not to be able to pull it out with some coins.

-14

The following perfect translation is bound to result in ambiguity now and again because it has an obvious literal meaning, but it is perhaps the best.

  • Il est petit.

Wiktionnaire, 3

Cordial (mesquin, étroit)

A good synonym of "petit" in this context is "mesquin", but it might not communicate as well as does "petit" how thouroughly contemptible someone holds this behaviour to be.

(TLFi) mesquin 2. Qui fait preuve d'une parcimonie excessive, compte tenu de ses moyens, de sa qualité; qui s'attache bassement aux intérêts matériels. Synon. chiche, avare; anton. généreux, prodigue.
• Vieillard mesquin.
• On voit quelquefois des gens qui, pauvres et mesquins, semblent se réveiller (...) et deviennent tout à coup éclatants, prodigues et magnifiques (Hugo,Misér., t.1, 1862, p.837).

Another possibility, but less pungent considering the negation it implies

  • Il n'est pas large.

  • (TLFi) 5. Domaine de la vie matérielle
    a) […]
    b) Qui est généreux, qui donne sans compter. Bonté large; avoir la bourse large.

6
  • 5
    Il est petit just doesn't work here so can't be "perhaps the best translation".
    – jlliagre
    Jul 7, 2023 at 4:24
  • 9
    Petit est trop éloigné du sens avare pour être une bonne réponse ici. Notez comment dans la question de l'OP, il n'est question que d'argent - l'OP stipule même explicitement "still they have problems with money". Ce n'est pas le cas dans le mot petit en Français. Radin serait beaucoup plus proche.
    – Frank
    Jul 7, 2023 at 4:24
  • 1
    @Frank jinx :-)
    – jlliagre
    Jul 7, 2023 at 4:27
  • 7
    Quelqu'un de petit, c'est quelqu'un qui cherche des querelles avec ses voisins pour un rien, qui prend la mouche pour un oui ou pour un non, qui n'a pas de classe, qui s'acharne à vouloir avoir toujours raison (à tort, bien entendu), qui s'attache à des details sans conséquences, qui cherche la vengeance quand ils ont tort... mais le lien avec l'argent n'est pas la première chose qui vient à l'esprit. D'ailleurs, les références citées pour petit ne font pas référence à l'argent non plus.
    – Frank
    Jul 7, 2023 at 4:36
  • 1
    Pour mesquin, même si le sens Qui fait preuve d'une parcimonie excessive, compte tenu de ses moyens est possible, TLFi, le modère immédiatement par qui s'attache bassement aux intérêts matériels. La connotation avaricieux n'et pas la première qui vient à l'esprit quand on utilise le mot mesquin de nos jours. Les mots bas et petits viennent à l'esprit en premier, sans nécessairement une référence à l'argent.
    – Frank
    Jul 7, 2023 at 4:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.