2

Example 1:

Example 1 enter image description here

Example 2:

Example 2 enter image description here

Example 3:

Example 3 enter image description here

Until today, I thought this phrase was, "qui n'ont pu signer".

After I saw the new answer about Savoir with Circumflex, I wondered if this could be transcribed as "qui n'ont ſcu signer" or "qui n'ont ſsu signer"?

Examples updated with nearby instances of "paroisse" or "paroiſse" in the same hand.

11
  • Il y a un vieux "s" qui ressemble à un "f", mais il y a un "pont" de trop pour que ce soit ce "s/f" à mon avis. Il faudrait voir d'autres exemples de "p" de la même main.
    – Frank
    Nov 22, 2023 at 15:43
  • @Frank Question updated. Nov 22, 2023 at 15:55
  • 2
    Hmmm. But in the case of "paroisse", there are clearly 2 "s", the first apparently using that old "f" typography, the second loop clearly being the second "s". In the case of "pu/su", there would be only one "s" involved, so the similarity with "paroisse" IMHO breaks down. Also, in this handwriting, the "s" seems to be pointy at the top, whereas the initial "p" of "paroisse" is more rounded? I would gravitate towards "pu signer".
    – Frank
    Nov 22, 2023 at 16:07
  • @Frank I see now the need for context clues. Feel free to post the answer. Nov 22, 2023 at 16:13
  • 2
    Savoir, c'est pouvoir ! ;-)
    – jlliagre
    Nov 22, 2023 at 18:01

1 Answer 1

2

From looking at other examples of "p" and "s" in the text, it seems that in the case of "paroisse", there are clearly 2 "s", the first apparently using an old "f" typography, the second loop clearly being the second "s". But in the case of "pu/su", there would be only one "s" involved, so the similarity with the "s" in "paroisse" IMHO breaks down. Also, in this handwriting, the "s" seems to be pointy at the top, whereas the initial "p" of "paroisse" seems to be more rounded. I would thus gravitate towards "pu signer", rather than "su signer".

2
  • Writing double s as long followed by short s in this way was standard: see babelstone.co.uk/Blog/2006/06/rules-for-long-s.html. I agree though that this reads to me as "pu" rather than "su".
    – Aant
    Nov 22, 2023 at 23:43
  • 2
    If you trace a double "s" and a "p" in cursive, the "s" tends to be more pointy, the "p" more round, something that seems apparent in all 3 examples of "pu".
    – Frank
    Nov 23, 2023 at 1:25

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