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I know that (a standalone) d'accord literally means I agree, but at the same time it is used more broadly to mean OK (in English).

My question is, does d'accord work as a response to a request?

For example, if someone asks me to do some shopping, can I say D'accord to mean I will do the shpping? My impression is that I can, but I suppose, in English, I agree is not possible in that context. So even if it is possible, is it a sort of accepted error?


Related questions:

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    d'accord is just short for je suis d'accord and it seems that the accepted answer to the question you link to answers your question : "je suis d'accord implies je suis d'accord avec quelqu'un ou avec une suggestion, une idée, etc. Meaning "I agree with someone/some idea...". "– I will do the shopping – OK (Right-o)" – Je vais faire les courses – D'accord (D'accord/Ça marche/c'est bon)
    – None
    Commented Mar 2 at 8:02
  • 2
    Does this answer your question? Usage of d’accord?
    – None
    Commented Mar 4 at 6:57

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This is a widespread use of "d'accord".

"D'accord" expresses agreement: if you agree to someone asking you to do something it is implied that you are going to do it.

That said, it works as long as what you are asked is a direct request, but can feel uncanny as an answer to an implied request where there is no specified course of action:

This looks fine:

- Range tes affaires: on part dans cinq minutes et cette fois pas question d'être en retard!
- D'accord Maman...

- Tu peux faire la fermeture du magasin ce soir? Jean-Paul est malade et j'ai un diner de famille à préparer.
- D'accord, mais la semaine prochaine c'est toi qui prend le créneau du lundi matin.

This feels weird:

- On a besoin de plus de riz, qui va faire les courses ?
- D'accord

Sure, that person agrees they need more rice, but do they volunteer for shopping? It's unclear.

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