Questions tagged [partitif]

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30
votes
1answer
55k views

Usage of “d'eau” vs “de l'eau”

I'm confused about when to use “d'eau” and when to use “de l'eau”. For example, if someone asks “what is in that carafe?”, I think it is correct to answer “c'est de l'eau”. But if you ask for a carafe ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

« Parler de » + un article partitif ou l'article indéfini « des » ?

Je veux exprimer la notion anglaise : It talks about French tax evasion. (où « it » est un documentaire) En la traduisant, je suis arrivé à : Il parle de des évasions fiscale des française. ...
3
votes
3answers
866 views

“C'est du mauvais français” du vs de ?

Another user pointed out some poor phrasing in a French sentence I had linked to by saying "C'est du mauvais français." I am not sure why this uses du rather than de; my impression was that the ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

La difference entre « j'aime le fromage » et « j'aime du fromage »

La phrase « I like cheese » se traduit « j'aime le fromage » et « J'aime du fromage ». Quelle est la différence ?
20
votes
6answers
62k views

When to use “du” instead of “des”?

I don't understand why people sometimes use 'du' instead of 'des' when the meaning of both articles is the same. For example, "some pencils" is des crayons whereas "some cheese" is du fromage.
40
votes
5answers
5k views

Do native speakers of French generally use “du/de la” when thinking of nouns like eau, sel, etc?

This is sort of a question about the extent to which French speakers associate partitive articles with nouns that use them. If you ask for water at a restaurant, you might say "De l'eau, s'il vous ...
7
votes
2answers
818 views

Why don't “des”, “de la”, “du” always become “de” in negative sentences?

I learn French on my own, I do the exercises from "Grammaire-Cours de Civilisation française de la Sorbonne- 350 exercices, Niveau Superieur I". In that book, there is an exercise as follows ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Why “de” in “à de”?

On my Palmolive brand dishwashing soap, one of the warnings on the label is: NE PAS MÉLANGER À DE L'EAU DE JAVEL. DO NOT USE WITH CHLORINE BLEACH I am trying to understand why the "de" is in ...
8
votes
1answer
469 views

Quelles expériences s'utilisent sans l'article partitif ?

Il y a des fois où, pour la description d'une expérience ou émotion, on n'utilise pas l'article partitif, par exemple: J'ai peur. J'ai chaud. Alors, j'ai été surpris quand j'ai vu J'ai de ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

The partitive articles in negative sentences

In this sentence “de” is an article partitif: Il ne boit pas de café au petit déjeuner. Why? Is there any préposition de négation generally? Update: In negations “ne … plus”, “ne … jamais”, … ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Does “je bois du café” make correct use of partitives?

I would like to know how to say in French "I drink coffee" in a general meaning I'm thinking about "je bois du café", is it right? I have some doubts using the partitifs.
0
votes
3answers
128 views

Why “de” in “de vos nouvelles”?

The translation of "Nice to hear from you again!" is C'est bon d'avoir de vos nouvelles ! Why is de necessary in de vos nouvelles? Why can't we just say vos nouvelles? In a similar example, we ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Are “de la bière” and “de bière” both acceptable?

Are the following sentences both correct? Je donne de la bière à Jean; Je donne de bière à Jean.
2
votes
1answer
201 views

How to use partitive articles following possessive adjectives?

For instance, how would I translate the following sentence? Where is my water? And I mean specifically using eau, not cheating by using mon verre. Would it be Où est mon eau? or Où est mon d'eau?...
1
vote
2answers
138 views

Why the need to place “du” in the phase “Du Lowell tout craché”?

Du Lowell tout craché, en effet. As I understand it, this sentence means: That’s very typical of Lowell, indeed. But I’m not sure why you need to place "du" at the top.
1
vote
1answer
113 views

The use of the “en” pronoun

My French teacher taught me that when you are asked to replace any noun followed by “de”, always use the personal pronoun “en”. However, I presumed that she was always referring to any noun followed ...