Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Code code:"if (foo != bar)"
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Bookmarks inbookmarks:mine
inbookmarks:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with
Search options user 2414

Concerne les expressions, au sens grammatical, dont le sens peut être interprété. L'étiquette *expressions-idiomatiques* regroupe les expressions ou les formulations dont le sens est opaque.

6
votes
2
votes
Dans la première, je vois : bonne pêche, cf. 4.a, le bon résultat d’une activité de pêche; Chasse et Pêche, était une émission de télévision de nuit sur TF1 dans les années 90 consacrée aux sujets — …
answered Apr 29 '14 by Édouard
3
votes
It seems unlikely that the girl from your textbook want to express goodbye by saying “On continue ?”. Literally, it means « Shall we continue? » although in a quite familiar way. Il est peu probabl …
answered Jan 30 '14 by Édouard
9
votes
The word you’re looking for is simply “mème”.
answered Apr 11 '15 by Édouard
5
votes
“About” by itself can sometimes be translated as “à propos”; “to be about”, however, is translated as “concerner”. Thus, neither or your sentences is french. For your translation, I would write: “Si …
answered Nov 19 '13 by Édouard
2
votes
You are right, Google Translate is wrong. “Ne pas avoir à se plaindre” is quite idiomatic and means approximately “to have no reason to complain”, i.e. to be satisfied with a general situation. The e …
answered Jan 14 '14 by Édouard
22
votes
Both “Je ne sais pas quoi dire” and “Je ne sais quoi dire” are correct translations for “I don’t know what to say”. With most verbs, skipping the “pas” sounds dated, but with “savoir”, not so much; st …
answered Sep 24 '13 by Édouard
10
votes
“Kiffer” is a derivative of “kif”, which comes from Arabic meaning “hashish” (or at least something related to hemp, I’m a bit short on serious references), figuratively “sensation of pleasure (due to …
answered Aug 30 '13 by Édouard
0
votes
Depending on the context, I would suggest Ce n’est pas la mer à boire.
answered May 6 '15 by Édouard
6
votes
Je trouve bien plus à propos d’employer « venu » plutôt qu’« arrivé » dans ce contexte. Nous verrons les résultats l’été venu. J’aime moins L’été venu, nous verrons les résultats. Ou, tout …
answered Mar 31 '14 by Édouard