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Le champ lexical (semantic field) du mot soit est le verbe être. Les mots d'un même champ lexical peuvent être des noms, des adjectifs qualificatifs ou des verbes. champ lexical, or semantic field in English champ lexical The three meanings in French are derived from the third person singular present subjunctive of the verbe être. the either /or use: ...


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They are all related to the verb être and can eventually be translated to "be". Qu'il soit coupable ou pas, je m'en fiche. → Whether he is guilty or not, I don't care. → Be he guilty or not [...]. Je partirai soit lundi, soit mardi (I will leave either Monday or Tuesday.) means under the cover Je viendrai que ce soit lundi, que ce soit mardi. → I ...


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1 a- From what can be read at the entry for "a-", which is called more precisely a combining form (Fr : élément formant), this is not so; direction is one possibility but not the only one; there are four possibilities, including direction. (added numbers ([1°], …) are used so as to be able to refer to the part they apply to in the present section ...


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The French combien is unique among the Romance languages. All of them inherited a word from the Latin quantus ("how much/how many/how big"). It is quant in French, Catalan and Occitan, quanto in Italian and Portuguese, cuanto in Spanish, cât in Romanian, and so on. However, the French quant was competing with its homonymous quant1, inherited from ...


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Google Translate is not a dictionary. Nevertheless, mettre sur une fiche means precisely "to file". A collection of fiches is un fichier, i.e. a file. Despite the different wording, the Collins gives all meanings. The Cambridge only shows one indeed but I expect that most free online dictionaries are abridged versions of paper based ones, or only ...


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Ficher can have several meanings but it is not a verb we would use very much except for the colloquial use. 1- The oldest and primary meaning of ficher is faire entrer par la pointe, it comes from Latin figere which means "to plant", "to fix". Its past participle is regular: fiché. It is not used much, I can't say why, other verbs are ...


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