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I must say the meaning "to manage affairs" does not exist in French, hence this may be more appropriate in the English language section. Nevertheless, I can help you guess the evolution of meaning : solicitor, "one who urges" from Old French soliciteor. soliciteur, from soliciter. Meaning "one who conducts matters on behalft of ...


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The etymologies of (forfait) and (forfait) differ so one hasn't really shifted into the other.


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The prefix de- had more than one meaning in Latin, and many of them persisted and developed over time. Like all core morphemes, the meaning is extremely hard to define and pin down the semantic nuances. At least we're only dealing with the bound morpheme here, not the free one, which has a 22,000-word definition! (Interesting how dictionaries went from ...


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The TLFi gives everything you are looking for: Étymol. et Hist. 1. Fin XIIes. «petit mot» (Orson de Beauvais, 532 ds T.-L.: un sol motet sonner) rare, cependant encore attesté au XVIIes. (Carloix ds Littré). 2. ca 1270 «petit poème, (d'inspiration religieuse ou non) destiné à être chanté, à deux, trois ou quatre parties distinctes» (Rutebeuf, La desputoison ...


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Old French didn't "borrow" from Latin, Latin evolved to what became Old French (among other languages.) Anyway, there is no problem with premisse etymology being "sent ahead". The premisses are the propositions "sent" ahead, i.e. transmitted, expressed first while the conclusion is what is expressed next.


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Basically, the "agréer" verb translates as : Pronoun and verb or infinitive verb followed by a direct or indirect object : giving agreement/expressing convenience regarding the object. Example: "J'agrée à ses dires", "Ayant agréer les termes du contrat, ..." Non pronoun subject and verb followed by a direct or indirect object : ...


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Inventing and finding can be connected in meaning : inventing, creating or composing is sometimes described as finding new ideas, or finding inspiration, Anyway, there are still other possible sources for trouver. For example, Littré cites a source tracing it from latin turbare (to disturb, to trouble) : Il est certain que turbare a pu fournir la forme du ...


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The etymology of trouver is not well established so the shift you mention is hypothetical. The more common etymology (the one you found in the wiktionary) states it comes from the Latin tropus. An interesting alternative theory by Francesco Benozzo is that trouver would come from a Celtic verb that was part of the hunting vocabulary used in Gaul. Other ...


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