13

French borrowed versus (vs) from English in 1965 and is nowadays widely used in the academic world. It is in all recent dictionaries, e.g. Larousse or the Dictionnaire historique en langue française (not online). The Académie Française discourages its use because French has "contre, ou, face à, en face de and par opposition that can express the same idea ...


12

Versus est un mot d'origine latine que j'ai toujours vu être utilisé aussi bien en anglais (très courant) qu'en français (moins courant). Je précise que cette fréquence d'utilisation est celle que j'ai notée au fil du temps, elle n'a rien de "scientifique". D'ailleurs, il semblerait que l'Académie Française désapprouve l'emploi de "versus" mais je n'ai pas ...


5

Those are all a little dated, and are from the times where people used T-9 (basically typing with the 1234567890 keyboard, where each number has 3-4 letters on it). Now, in the age of smartphones and autocorrect, it's much less frequent to see this type of slang. I'll add precision on each one of them. (0) mdr, dsl, a+ and others are almost always written ...


4

Since the context is a toggle button in a graphical user interface, I assume your priority is less to find the exact official (approved by the Académie Française) equivalent to "vs", than to find something bearing approximately the same meaning with the least number of letters. vs would be acceptable but this is not widely used and, depending on your ...


3

Such slang are used a lot for younger folk near me. (Canadian French). Using them make you look like a young adult, borderline redneck if you use too much of them. To note, In younger folk such writing bring a problem, they have difficulty to correctly write after a long time not practicing a good French. In example one of my step brother, which is French ...


2

I just transform @None's (Laure) comment into an answer in order to remove this question from the queue of unanswered ones (as @Quidam suggests). [A couple of things were added.] A (or À) (fill in with the name of the town where you were born) N° Départ. [1] stands for Département (where you were born). The final dot makes clear it is not the word départ ...


1

Please note that the correct abbreviation for département is dép. Départ means departure in French.


1

Ce n'est pas de l'argot, ce sont juste des abbréviations pour écrire plus vite ou avec moins de lettres. En France, cela date du temps du Minitel (sur lequel les accents étaient absents ou difficiles à composer et dont les délais d'échanges étaient fortement perceptibles), puis cela a été transposé aux SMS (limités à 140 caractères). A ces époques les ...


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