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1

"Galles" is a proper noun, which are not due to respect rules of orthography : in French, we say "les noms propres n'ont pas d'orthographe". Here, le "Pays de Galles" is like le "Royaume des aveugles" (meaning a country which contains blind people, or Wales people, or fairies and goblins) is singular: "le pays" remains the subject of the verb, not the ...


4

In pays de Galles, Galles is not the name of the people, or at least, it hasn't been perceived that way any time since 1800. Since this question was motivated by the question of whether the Romanian name for Wales, Ţara Galilor (literally Country of the Gauls, or Pays des Galles) was a mistranslation, and this name first appeared in the 19th century, the ...


6

After some research, I may be able to clarify some points. It appears that, yes, Galles is a noun that represents a plural noun, as you showed before with the cnrtl definition. However, you need to know that this word is part of some nouns that are only used with a plural form, and it has no singular form. It appears this kind of unvariable nouns are called ...


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