Hot answers tagged

46

Les chiffres sont des signes qui servent à écrire les nombres. Il y a 10 chiffres : 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, et 9. Les nombres représentent une valeur, une quantité. Le nombre 1853 (mille huit cent cinquante-trois) s'écrit avec quatre chiffres. Un numéro sert à identifier, à distinguer un élément parmi d'autre. Si je dis d'un sportif qu'il a le dossard ...


39

The first expression that comes to mind is: Mais c'est comme ça. e.g.: Regarde, on a perdu le match, mais c'est comme ça. La seule chose qu'on peut faire, c'est travailler encore plus dur pour le prochain. Je ne suis pas très fan du nouveau petit ami de ma fille, mais c'est comme ça. While mais c'est comme ça is relatively close to the English "...


38

I would suggest: Les chiens ne font pas des chats Literally: dogs do not make (i.e. give birth to) cats.


37

C'est quoi ce bordel ? Qu'est-ce que tu fous, mec ? sont les deux expressions qui me viennent à l'esprit pour rapporter une « discussion » un peu vive. Ne pas le traduire ? remplacer bordel par bazar et fous par fais ? Mais, c'est un peu faux-cul (remplacer par langue de bois). EDIT Quel merdier ! concis, peut être utilisé à l'écrit à tous les ...


33

I think the idiomatic expression is: Tu vis dans une caverne ou quoi ? Variation courtesy of TonioElGringo: Tu vis dans une grotte ? ('ou quoi' can be left implicit also) Literally 'Are you living in a cavern or what ?'. The wording is not syntactically correct as it should be 'Vis tu' and not 'Tu vis', but this is an usual formulation for this ...


29

There is no perfect translation, but there is a similar expression. When you are talking about a set of things, you can say “le dernier [élément], et non le moindre” (there are many minor variations). You can find examples, and other translations, on Linguee; here are a few examples: Certainly last, but not least, we have Gary Wilson. Le dernier ...


27

Je préfère: Il est déchaîné aujourd'hui! Ou, comme l'illustra Uderzo sur un scénario de Goscinny dans Astérix et les Goths :


27

I hear often the negative form "c'est pas ma tasse de thé" in France but almost never the affirmative "c'est ma tasse de thé" . "C'est mon truc" works in both affirmative and negative forms. The familiar "c'est (pas) mon délire" works as well in circles of young friends. Another familiar expression is "c'est (pas) mon dada", which is older. It works in ...


26

In French, to address a letter to whom it may concern I would use: Madame, Monsieur Inside the text of the letter, you could use the à qui de droit translation: You should forward this letter to whom it may concern Vous pouvez transférer cette lettre à qui de droit source: Banque de dépannage linguistique de l'Office québecois de la langue ...


26

Poule mouillée (lit. “wet hen”) is close: it means a person who lacks courage. It isn't as widely applicable as chicken: you can't use it as an adjective, and it's not as natural as in English to use it as an interjection (though you can say “Espèce de poule mouillée !”, which is roughly equivalent to “You [are] chicken!”). It is usually constructed as “X ...


26

«Ce n'est pas sorcier» would be a good equivalent expression.


25

Up here in Canada, a common saying is "La pomme ne tombe jamais loin de l'arbre" which would translate to "The apple never falls far from the tree" Something along the lines that childrens always look or act like their parents/ancestors. It's closely related to the other answers (which appears in the "Synonymes" section here : https://fr....


24

Je souhaiterais fournir ici une perspective québécoise au problème que pose la traduction de cette locution d'ordre familière et somme toute grossière. On remarque que des suggestions mentionnées jusqu'à maintenant se dégagent deux problématiques. La première concerne le registre : Il peut être de bon aloi de vouloir tempérer le propos en traduisant et d'...


24

A “numéro” is an identifier, usually made of digits. It’s a nominal number. If you were to abbreviate the “number” which correspond to “numéro”, you would usually use a hash sign, ‘#’. It is, in particular, used for phone numbers. La commande numéro 173 est prête à la boucherie. Order number 173 is ready at the butcher’s counter. Mon numéro de ...


24

Another possible translation is: Pris la main dans le sac Literally means caught with the hand in the bag, but is most often translated as "caught red-handed". While not colloquial, it is arguably less formal than "pris sur le fait" or "pris en flagrant délit".


23

I think there are several ways to translate this, with different levels of language: Bien fait pour toi ! (probably the most commonly used) Ça t'apprendra ! (also quite common) Ça te fera les pieds ! (seems a bit outdated) Bien fait pour ta gueule ! (vulgar, but still used)


21

Seconde réponse (Eurêka!) (j'ai préféré faire une seconde réponse car elle va dans un tout autre sens que la première piste que j'avais exprimée.) L'équivalent en français est l'association de "mais" avec un juron de renforcement. Mais putain ?! / What the fuck?! La relecture des réponses proposées m'a rappelé qu'il y a une formulation bien spécifique, ...


21

Populaire : Je m’en bats l’œil. Je m’en tamponne le coquillard. Familier : J’en ai rien à fiche. / Je m'en fiche. J’en ai rien à secouer. Je m'en fous. Vulgaires : J’en ai rien à foutre. J’en ai rien à branler. Très vulgaire : Je m’en bats les couilles. On peut observer un thème sous-jacent à ces diverses propositions. Si on préfère ...


21

Le français ne permet pas de passer d'un nom à un adjectif ou à un verbe aussi facilement que l'anglais. Il n'est par ailleurs pas possible de construire un nouveau mot en en accolant deux. Dès lors, je propose l'emploi d'un adjectif existant mais qui s'applique tout à fait à votre exemple (bien que plus générique): un titre racoleur ce terme n'est pas ...


21

Maybe "pris sur le fait" or "pris en flagrant délit". The first one is more neutral and the second one is originally a police-justice saying.


21

The idea can be expressed in various ways. Even though each phrase has a different literal meaning and a different tone, they all essentially boil down to the same core idea: "you've got another think coming". Si tu crois qu'on va se marier pour tes beaux yeux, tu peux te gratter ! Si tu crois qu'on va se marier pour tes beaux yeux, détrompe-toi ! ...


20

One can translate this with the adjective futur: La future mariée, une future célébrité, etc… (The future bride, a future celebrity, etc…) Regarding parents-to-be, it's easier to speak of a futur papa or a future maman than of a futur père or a future mère. Variants: To refer to future progression (with an air of hope) when the quality being referred ...


20

Je trouve que l'expression « un prêté pour un rendu » est la plus proche. Elle peut être utilisée aussi bien dans des contextes où « what goes around, comes around » concerne une action valorisée que lorsqu'elle concerne une action reprochée. Lorsque l'expression a une connotation négative ou à la rigueur neutre, je suis les propositions de « on récolte ce ...


20

If you want to use a present simple as in English, you use "passer", like "Je passe un examen", "tu passes un examen",... But if you want to use a present Be+ing, you should use "être en train de", like "Je suis en train de passer un examen", "tu es en train de passer un examen", etc... We use "être en train de" to describe an action that is happening. I ...


20

It all depends on the context, but in those two particular cases, believe it or not, a French speaker may actually use “C'est la vie”. Écoute, on a perdu. C'est la vie. On fera mieux la prochaine fois. Son nouveau petit ami ne me plaît pas beaucoup, mais que dire ? C'est la vie.


19

“Après ce qui s'est passé hier” is perfectly correct. If you're looking for something shorter, you may say “depuis hier”.


19

Does such a thing as question tags exist in French? Yes, the closest equivalent is "n'est-ce-pas ?" which is much simpler as it stays invariable unlike the English form. However, it is not that much used nowadays and is becoming too formal and quite outdated, at least in France. — Tu n'a pas mangé, n'est-ce-pas ? — Si, j'ai mangé. or — Non, je n'ai ...


19

I'd recommend place or emplacement. As you said fente and rainure don't fit in this context. Créneau is closer but is really associated with time slots and I wouldn't use it. Place literally means spot, but is also very associated with a one-person "seat". For example "une place de cinéma" is both a movie ticket and the seat where one person can sit. "...


18

On parle de courants (et de contre-courants) anticonformistes mais le terme ne convient pas pour rendre hipster sans précisions supplémentaires. C'est un contre courant à la culture dominante, certes, mais il y a tellement de courants et contre-courants que c'est insuffisant. Perso je n'ai jamais traduit et toujours dit hipster... On pourrait peut-être ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible