32

There is indeed a nuance: "Dans deux jours" means "in two days" "Dans les deux jours" means "within the next two days" So if I say on a Monday "je reviendrai dans deux jours", that means I'll show up on Wednesday, not before. Compare with "je reviendrai dans les deux jours": I can show up at any time between today and Wednesday. You can also use it with ...


16

In a full sentence (ie, with a verb), if the body part is preceded by a possessive adjective "ses/son/sa/leur/leurs", it means that the body part does not belong to the body of the subject (note: this is true for "correct" French: in relaxed speech, speakers may tend to use a possessive article indifferently. This is for instance a ...


15

« Du » est la contraction de « de le ». Quand on devrait dire ou écrire « de le » et que « le » est un article, on utilise en fait « du ». Ce n’est pas un choix, cette contraction est obligatoire, qu'il s'agisse d'un article partitif ou d'une préposition de suivie par l'article le. La voiture de Jacques La voiture de la juge *La voiture de le ...


8

The apostrophe is commonly taught to come so that vowels don't come close to each other. This is not stated precisely, and you might be misunderstanding. The apostrophe is a consequence of the pronunciation. What happens in French is that in some cases, two vowel sounds can't be next to each other, so the first one is removed. The apostrophe is used to ...


6

In both English and French, certain places are considered to have a kind of general version as well as a specific location. Here are a couple in English: Where did you get that book? Oh, the library. It doesn't really matter which library or which branch for you to use this sentence. You wouldn't say "a library" here. You're a fan of summer? Oh, ...


5

With expressions of clock time, use the preposition à to say (at) what time. You can leave out the "at" in English, but not the à in French. It answers the question « À quelle heure ... ? » À quelle heure ? À midi. Demain on a rendez-vous à 13h30. On va dîner à 19h00. Je me lève toujours à cinq heures. For expressions of repeated days or ...


4

Dans le cas d'un titre, ici un nom de site, il n'est pas nécessaire d'écrire un article défini (le/la/les). Coutures éclatantes est le plus approprié. En français, une grande partie des adjectifs qualificatifs sont écrits après le nom / pronom. Quelques exceptions existent telles que une grande maison,un joli jardin, cependant dans ce cas-là, on dit bien ...


4

There is something not quite usual in this locution; the only solution from those proposed is "Jaime les croissants avec du beurre." and so the test is quite right from the point of view of grammar and context. However, the context is quite rare. The usual locution is "croissant au beurre" (J'aime les croissants au beurre.). Croissants "au beurre" are ...


4

Je vois ça comme deux façons de dire la même chose. La deuxième est une assertion plus générale, donc plus forte. On peux faire le rapprochement avec la différence entre ces deux phrases : Il n'y a pas de survivants Il n'y a aucun survivant L'information est la même (le nombre de survivants est 0) mais la deuxième formulation est plus "forte". La ...


4

In this answer, I learned that with "correct" French, you aren't supposed to use possessive determiners for body parts ("ma tête, mes jambes"), but instead use a definite article ("la tête, les jambes"). The reply you quote didn't clearly stated this "rule1" only apply to sentence like: Elle aime masser ses jambes. ...


4

L'absence d'article est possible avec le nom d'un jour de semaine mais weekend ne correspond pas à cette définition, comprenant deux jours successifs (voire plus si prolongé). Pour distinguer les deux cas, on dira le weekend s'il s'agit des weekends en général, ce weekend pour parler du plus proche, ou alors le weekend dernier / le weekend prochain s'il y a ...


4

This use of the apostrophe goes back to Old French, at a point when the final /ə/ of any word was always pronounced, unless it was followed by a vowel, in which case it was systematically elided. In this respect, this means that le (and any other word used with the apostrophe, like se, que, je, si, de, la or (at the time) ma or sa) would have had the exact ...


3

As a complement to user jlliagre's answer I'll add the following. It is possible to speak of "un sens de l'humour" on the condition that "sens" be modified by an adjective; however, few adjectives might be idiomatic. The adjective "grand" is. Ils ont un grand sens de l'humour. (ngram, ref.) As illogical as it may seem "un ...


3

The first form is the most usual one. Here sens de l'humour is seen as something you have or you haven't. It is assumed there is just one sens de l'humour. If you say il a un sens de l'humour, you mean the person has something that looks like the sens de l'humour but isn't the mainstream one. That would be more like: Il a un sens de l'humour particulier.


3

"Nous sommes le lundi", as is, is not used; there must be precisions added as to what "lundi" you are talking about; what you can use is "Nous sommes lundi." or "Nous sommes un lundi.", but this last one is not much in favour. ngram "Je suis né un" is essentially used for days in a nominal form. je suis né ...


3

This rule does not take into account exceptions that are dictated by context in which various parts of the same sort have to be differentiated. In the last sentence, if the article is used there is no way to ensure whose hands are meant. In the second sentence, "mes" (jambes) could have been "les": the rule is not applied in this case (...


3

First, why did we use the partitive article "de l'" instead of the indefinite articles "des" for the word "ananas". You can use either the partitive or the indefinite articles here but it makes more sense to use the partitive if you didn't eat whole ananas but chunks / slices of them, probably the most common case. That would ...


3

In je parle français, français is used adverbially so doesn't require an article. Other examples of such usage are: Je m'habille français. Je mange français. J'achète français. Je roule français. Je parle le français is however possible and correct and so is je parle en français (which has a slightly different meaning). With être, it is no more an ...


3

Si on parle d'une partie de son propre corps, la règle est d'utiliser l'article défini, et éventuellement un pronom réfléchi avec le verbe (ce qui n'est pas possible dans votre exemple): Elle a mal à la main Elle s'est brossé les dents L'usage d'un adjectif possessif pour parler d'une partie de son propre corps peut être entendu en langage familier, mais c'...


3

The simple reason is that in "le" the e is not silent, whereas in "une" the e is silent e. le [lə] une [yn]


2

Both Italian and French being romance languages (derived from Latin) and very close cousins, the mechanism of introduction of article is the same. A justification could be that name of a country is derived from the name of people with the suffix -ie or -ique, as a substitute for "le pays des ...": La Franc(i)e = le pays des Francs La Tchéquie = le ...


2

Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain dans quelles circonstances le mot de se considère « article » et non pas « préposition », mais je peux dire que de ou d' s'utilise : au lieu de un, une, du, de la, de l', ou des pour introduire un complément d'objet direct dans un contexte négatif (par exemple, après un adverbe négatif tel que pas ou ...


2

L'adjectif "éclatant" est plus souvent placé après qu'avant le nom qu'il qualifie, mais la différence n'est pas très grande (rapport de 1 à 2) d'après ngram viewer. D'un pur point de vue de compréhension, les deux formulations "Éclatante couture" et "Couture éclatante" se valent donc à peu près, avec seulement des différences stylistiques : Légère ...


2

La phrase couramment utilisée en français est : J'aime les croissants au beurre. Ce qui signifie que les croissants sont réalisés avec une pâte (feuilletée) contenant du beurre. J’aime les croissants avec du beurre. Signifie des croissants avec du beurre ajouté par dessus, ce qui est grammaticalement correct mais n'est pas employé dans le langage ...


2

Dimitris answered very well questions 1 and 2. Here are some elements on question 3 (avec cinq huiles... vs. beaucoup d'huile). Actually, the difference between the two sentences — (2) «Il cuisine avec cinq huiles différentes.» vs. (3) «Le chef ajoute beaucoup d'huile.» — has nothing to do with avec, as it is a preposition and does not change anything. You ...


2

Je préfère cuisiner avec de l'huile. I prefer cooking with oil. Here de l' is a partitive article. It may be conveyed by 'some' (or 'any'). Nevertheless,'some' is often omitted. The partitive article refers to an unspecified quantity of food, liquid, or some other uncountable noun. English has no equivalent article – the partitive is usually translated by ...


2

The apostrophe's aren't simply "used", they are used for a purpose. In French, as in English, apostrophes can be used to indicate that some letters have been omitted. For instance: la école → l'école — the "a_" has been replace by the apostrophe. do not → don't — the "o_" has been replaced by the apostrophe. In the case of &...


1

Nothing makes the definite article compulsory in any of the sentences you give. Its use in this case belong to a sustained language register. Here's what Le bon usage (10e edition,§ 594) says: Le pronom un construit avec un complément partitif (...) peut être précédé de l'article élidé, mais le plus souvent il s'emploie sans cet article (sauf de deux choses ...


1

Like Italian (l'industria), French elides the feminine definite article final A (the A is not pronounced and replaced by an apostrophe). *La industrie → L'industrie *La âme → L'âme *La amie → L'amie *La eau → L'eau If the word starts with an H, the elision is done when the it is muet (muted, silent). Examples of H muet: L'horreur L'huile L'humeur L'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible