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25 votes
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Is it acceptable to use "le couleur" in any situation?

Is it acceptable to use "le couleur" in any situation except for when referring to a certain Canadian pop band? Even though this was most likely a typo and there is no doubt that the gender ...
ninja米étoilé's user avatar
18 votes
Accepted

What is happening grammatically in the street name "Rue de Seine"?

« Les noms désignant des régions (continents, pays, provinces, départements, etc.), des montagnes, des mers ou des lacs, des cours d'eau » prennent « ordinairement » l'article défini sauf que « pour ...
ninja米étoilé's user avatar
17 votes

Is it acceptable to use "le couleur" in any situation?

French here. This could be a joke / pun between: La couleur = the color "Le" couleur = quelque chose qui coule = something that "flows" More precisely : "Couler" is a ...
Basj's user avatar
  • 291
16 votes
Accepted

Are there words in French that wil never have an indefinite article?

It's possible to use all of these with indefinite articles. But it's so uncommon, that it would only confuse learners. Choose a different way to provide the gender in these cases. Possibly definite ...
Stéphane Gimenez's user avatar
16 votes
Accepted

Why say "le bon bateau", not "un bon bateau"?

Both C'est dommage que bon nombre de photos ... and C'est dommage qu'un bon nombre de photos ... are equivalent and idiomatic, the first one is more stylish. On the other hand: Ça ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
11 votes
Accepted

How should I understand "des" in this sentence?

Pays is a word that has the same form in the singular and in the plural. It always has an s in the end. In : un des grands pays it is plural. And you can tell it is plural because the adjective ...
None's user avatar
  • 61.9k
11 votes
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"à la table" or "à table" for "at the table"

Both are correct. In the case of à la table, the definite article la suggests a certain table, that you can see, or that was talked about previously. In the case of à table, the meaning is rather that ...
Frank's user avatar
  • 9,410
10 votes
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Why don't “des”, “de la”, “du” always become “de” in negative sentences?

"Je ne bois pas de vin" is a generic statement : I don't drink wine, I don't like the taste. It's often said alone, you don't really need to add what you drink instead (and you probably don't always ...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
10 votes

"Il a les yeux noirs" ou "il a des yeux noirs"?

Both “Il a les yeux noirs” and “il a des yeux noirs” are possible but using les is more common. Il a les xxx + mandatory adjective usually means this is something intrinsic, a characteristic of the ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
10 votes
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Using “à des” instead of “aux”

This is because aux is a contraction of à les, and not à des. J’ai payé un café à des ados qui semblaient épuisés et désemparés. J’ai payé un café aux ados là-bas. Ils semblaient épuisés et ...
Pas un clue's user avatar
  • 11.4k
10 votes

Why "de" in "à de"?

Your understanding is correct, it is indeed "mélanger à" + partitive article used with "eau". The key difference between English and French is that in English, "some" or "any" are not always needed, ...
Greg's user avatar
  • 17.2k
10 votes
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Pourquoi l'usage du verbe aimer n'admet pas l'article partitif ?

L'article partitif est employé pour désigner une certaine quantité indénombrable. Son emploi est donc dépendant du sens du verbe dont dépend le nom qu'il précède. Je mange trois/ quelques/ des/ ...
None's user avatar
  • 61.9k
10 votes
Accepted

when can there be an article after a pronoun + être?

You write "[pronoun] + [être] could never be followed by an article". That's too simplified to be applied like that. Je suis dentiste but je suis un bon dentiste (not mandatory to have the ...
None's user avatar
  • 61.9k
10 votes

Is it acceptable to use "le couleur" in any situation?

This is a typo. "Couleur" is feminine. Nobody would write or say "le couleur" unless either: they are not that fluent in French (that's the kind of mistake even French children ...
Anne Aunyme's user avatar
  • 6,339
10 votes

The omission of definite articles for the title of a book

Stendhal's book title is Le Rouge et le Noir. We might say one of the following: L'auteur de Le Rouge et Le Noir but de le doesn't sound good in French. It is better with a pause and guillemets: L'...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
9 votes
Accepted

Why is "une information" correct in French, but not its English equivalent?

In French there is no notion as strong as the English uncountable nature of certain things. If you can think about a way to count something, you can speak about it as a countable. For example, you ...
Anne Aunyme's user avatar
  • 6,339
9 votes

Why “rapporter des millions”?

"des" is an undefined article whereas "les" is a defined article. We don't know where do they (the millions) come from, so it is undefined. "les millions" would imply that they are defined by a ...
superbob's user avatar
  • 191
8 votes

La « boîte à lettres » ou la « boîte aux lettres » ?

Personellement, ayant vécu en France et en Belgique, je dirais que 'boîte aux lettres' est bien plus commun que 'boîte à lettres'. En effet, les sites suivants ont l'air de favoriser cet usage aussi: ...
Nico Mezeret's user avatar
  • 1,924
8 votes
Accepted

How to resolve the dilemma of saying "accoucher de de telles histoires"?

Seules des bardes pourraient accoucher de telles histoires. C'est l'article partitif qui disparaît. Après la préposition de on omet l'article indéfini pluriel et l'article partitif. En effet les ...
None's user avatar
  • 61.9k
8 votes

"Il a les yeux noirs" ou "il a des yeux noirs"?

The key is the word "grands." When talking about parts of the body, when the subject has them as one would expect (in this case, two eyes of a certain color), one uses the definite article. With the ...
Reibello's user avatar
  • 181
8 votes
Accepted

Translating "Passages from the New Testament" into French

"Passages du Nouveau Testament" is perfect, there is no reason to look for another translation. It is very common to leave out the article in titles of books, articles, chapters, etc. if they describe ...
Greg's user avatar
  • 17.2k
8 votes
Accepted

Pourquoi est ce que l'on dit "ton adresse" alors que le mot est féminin ?

Effectivement, c'est parce que le nom en question commence par une voyelle que l'on utilise 'Ton' à la place de 'Ta', afin de faciliter la prononciation. Ainsi on prononcerait cela : Ton n'adresse ...
Rémi Henry's user avatar
  • 1,229
8 votes

On an apparent "masstermization" phenomenon in contemporary informal French: “il y a de la jolie nana par ici”

La figure de style qui transforme en "chose indénombrable" ce qui ne l'est pas est du domaine de la métaphore. Quand elle s'applique à des être humains, on peut l’appeler réification, cf. TLFi B. − ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
8 votes

When should I use an article?

French nouns almost always require an article in French so that would be: Elle aime le lycée. This sentence is perfectly idiomatic. Le lycée is likely here the high-school she studies in, works at, ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
8 votes
Accepted

Why is "différents" before the noun in the following sentence and also no articles used?

L'adjectif différent antéposé signifie plusieurs La phrase pourrait s'écrire : (Ils ont participé à) plusieurs événements historiques. §B 2. Usuel, au plur. et antéposé avec valeur d'adj. ...
Toto's user avatar
  • 15k
8 votes
Accepted

Why do we use apostrophe in definite articles but not indefinite articles?

The apostrophe is commonly taught to come so that vowels don't come close to each other. This is not stated precisely, and you might be misunderstanding. The apostrophe is a consequence of the ...
Gilles 'SO nous est hostile''s user avatar
8 votes

Do you need to use an article for every noun when writing a title?

Articles are not always mandatory in titles (e.g. Guerre et Paix) but are not always optional either. For example Belle et Bête would be an awful title compared to La Belle et la Bête (Beauty and the ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
7 votes

Why do professions have no article when used after être?

It is not always être, it is not always a profession, it is not always one verb, and it is not always one noun. Quand j'étais enfant. Ils sont cousins. Il demeure Président du Conseil d'...
Jonathan's user avatar
  • 389
7 votes
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Why should I not include "une" in the sentence below?

We can try to explain this, but forgive me if I make a detour through the general case [if anyone sees something to add or to amend, please come forth]. Meanings of a singular noun First of all, we ...
fralau's user avatar
  • 1,022

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