49

Les chiffres sont des signes qui servent à écrire les nombres. Il y a 10 chiffres : 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, et 9. Les nombres représentent une valeur, une quantité. Le nombre 1853 (mille huit cent cinquante-trois) s'écrit avec quatre chiffres. Un numéro sert à identifier, à distinguer un élément parmi d'autre. Si je dis d'un sportif qu'il a le dossard ...


30

There can be a slight difference between the two sentences. For example, answering a question about his profession, you would use il est: — Quelle est sa profession ? — Il est avocat. But answering a question about who this person is, you would use c'est un: — Qui est cette personne ? — C'est un avocat.


25

A “numéro” is an identifier, usually made of digits. It’s a nominal number. If you were to abbreviate the “number” which correspond to “numéro”, you would usually use a hash sign, ‘#’. It is, in particular, used for phone numbers. La commande numéro 173 est prête à la boucherie. Order number 173 is ready at the butcher’s counter. Mon numéro de ...


22

“Veuillez” is the second person plural conjugation1 of “vouloir” in the impératif présent. “Allez à l’arrière du bus” in french is a direct order; “Veuillez aller à l’arrière du bus” (litt. “Want to go to the back of the bus”) is softer. By consequence, it is indeed only used when you ask someone to do something. In English, you should indeed translate it by ...


22

That's a shorthand for Note de l’éditeur (editor's note) and not "Near Death Experience" ;-) Note that the more common NDLR for Note de la rédaction has essentially the same meaning.


21

En français standard on dit : Ce que tu dis prête à confusion. L'origine de *confusant est probablement le terme anglais confusing. Ce mot essaie de reproduire la structure du terme anglais alors que — manque de bol peut-être — le verbe *confuser n'existe pas en français. Confus est un adjectif qui vient de confondre, bien qu'il soit distinct de son ...


19

TORT means wrong. It's used with avoir in french, and be in english Parfois, on voudrait avoir tort. Sometimes, you just want to be wrong. TORD means bend (verb TORDRE in conjugated form) Il peut tordre une barre de fer de ses mains. He can bend an iron rod with his hands. So in your example : " Est-ce que j'ai tort ? " is right but " Oui,...


19

I'd recommend place or emplacement. As you said fente and rainure don't fit in this context. Créneau is closer but is really associated with time slots and I wouldn't use it. Place literally means spot, but is also very associated with a one-person "seat". For example "une place de cinéma" is both a movie ticket and the seat where one person can sit. "...


16

It is not really a swear word, but I would tell my kids not to say that. It is not a "nice" word, although not extremely rude either. Let's say it is below average, polite conversation, but not very offensive either. You would most probably not write it. You can use it between friends, or in family (not counting the kids). The nuance is more one of disgust ...


16

Historiquement et de manière conforme à son étymologie, aïeul désigne effectivement d'abord et seulement le grand-père. (Et son féminin aïeule, la grand-mère) Il s'est très rapidement (début XIIIe) étendu au sens d’ancêtre en général. (C'est à dire sans indication précise de génération.) Attention : Depuis le XVIIIe siècle, on marque la distinction entre ...


15

Well, both translations are right, but the one you show on the picture is indeed 'piment', the hot peppers — the genus Capsicum (as well as Pimenta). Though, the big ones on that picture, the pepper bells are not piment but 'poivron' (species Capsicum annuum). The 'poivre' version of pepper is the one that's usually on the table with the salt (grey or black ...


15

Spatial Deixis An important aspect of demonstratives is that of spatial deixis. Deixis marks the relationship of something to a point of reference, distance in the case of spatial deixis. In English, here and there denote the spatial distance in relation to the speaker, the first proximal (near to the speaker), the second distal (far from the speaker). ...


15

Offrir is to give someone a present. Mes parents m'ont offert un stylo pour mon anniversaire. It can also be used for non material things, for example : Il m'a offert son amitié.1 Il m'a offert son aide.2 In those two preceding sentences offrir could be replaced by proposer, offrir there implies the recipient may refuse whatever (help or friendship or ...


14

Sortir and partir do not have the same meaning. Sortir means getting out of something in this context. A physical object or an abstract object is needed. For example, "je sors de chez moi", or "de la fumée sort de la cheminée", or also "l'accélération est sortie des valeurs limites de sécurité, c'est pourquoi la fusée s'est auto-détruite". When no object ...


14

"Pepper" has a few different equivalences in French, depending on what you're referring to. There are basically three different words: poivre, poivron and piment. Poivre is used to refer to the spice. Therefore black pepper will be poivre noir. Other examples include poivre blanc, poivre moulu, poivre à grain entier, etc. Poivron is used to refer to sweet ...


14

"vivre" corresponds to the general abstract meaning of "to live". "Habiter" is the restricted sense of living at one particular place. As a rule of thumb, you can always use "vivre" instead of "habiter", but the reverse is not always true. More precisely, you can only use "habiter" when you want to say "to live somewhere". Some examples: I live in this ...


14

Quelle est la différence entre une pile et une batterie ? En France et quand ce mot s'applique à un équipement fournissant de l'électricité, batterie a commencé à être utilisé comme raccourci de batterie d'accumulateurs, ensemble d'éléments rechargeables stockant et fournissant de l’électricité, utilisés en particuliers dans les véhicules. Batterie indique ...


14

L'étymologie permet d'éclaircir la différence. Une boucherie était l'endroit où l'on vendait de la viande de bouc et par extension, toutes les viandes crues (bœuf, mouton, etc.) Une charcuterie était l'endroit où l'on vendait des "chairs cuites" (chaircuiterie en ancien français), préparations directement consommables essentiellement à base de viande de ...


14

Nope, you have to say "Est-ce réellement différent ?" or "Y a-t-il la moindre différence ?".


13

Chose (du latin causa → « affaire ») a servi à désigner des termes divers. Au XVIe siècle il développe le sens actuel d'objet non spécifié (par opposition à objet) et sert aussi à désigner une personne dont on a oublié le nom. Truc est un mot issu d'une racine indo-européenne qui a donné des mots comme trucar (cogner, heurter en ancien provençal) et le russe ...


13

When you're talking about a specific business establishment, as opposed to the company in general, the usual term would be établissement. You have already posted a review of this business. Vous avez déjà posté une critique de cet établissement. When the business is a shop, it would be more common to use the word commerce. If you mean the company in ...


13

A “réponse de principe” is a non-definitive answer, i.e. what you would answer to the best of your knowledge right now. Let’s say for example group of friends are going to a beach house for a week in August. You meet the organiser at a party and he asks you if you think you’ll come. Of course, she can’t expect you to be able to give a definitive answer ...


13

By saying "ingénieur du logiciel", you are saying that you are the engineer of this software (which software depending on context). While correct, this is not what you meant to say. "ingénieur en logiciel" means "engineer in software (science)", which is what you meant. You can also omit the "en", and simply say "ingénieur logiciel" (I personally prefer ...


13

I would say that "dégueulasse" is not a swear word, but it is offensive, although it is commonly used in casual situations. It litterally comes from "dégueuler" which is the offensive word for "puke". French has this concept of "gros mot" which covers vocabulary of a certain level that typically includes swearing, vulgarities, and rude or offensive words. "...


13

Une traduction possible pourrait être : Je galère. C'est moins pessimiste que "je souffre" (qui est complètement passif).


13

Garce is explicitely misogynistic as its masculine, gars, has no negative meaning. C'est une conne is just the feminine of c'est un con so might fit the need, although it might be argued that even con is technically misogynistic too. Conne is however less likely to appear in a misogynistic context than connasse1. You might also say C'est une trou du cul, ...


13

For many centuries, songe used to be the only word to mean "dream" in French. It cames from the Latin somnium which relates to somnus (sommeil, sleep). Other romance languages have kept somnium as the main word for it (sp:sueño, it:sogno, pt:sonho, cat:somni, ro:somn...). On the other hand, rêve was created from the verb resver that meant to wander,...


13

One not subtle but major difference is that the verb conger doesn't exist... I guess you are thinking about the expression prendre congé de ... which is a formal way to say dire au revoir et quitter quelqu'un. e.g.: Je dois partir. (I have to go) Je dois vous quitter. (I have to leave you) Je dois prendre congé de vous. (I have to take leave of you) ...


12

Serait-ce sinisation que vous cherchez ? la définition du Wiktionnaire : Processus par lequel le mode de vie, la langue etc. deviennent plus chinois. […] la définition du TLF : Rendre chinois; donner certains caractères chinois. […]


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