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1

Viser à is described in the wiktionary page in the Verbe 3 paragraph. Avoir en vue une certaine fin, un certain résultat. According to the writers, the preposition à is not strictly required so viser à is not listed as a specific expression. On the other hand, the TLFi does list viser à as a set expression so it's a matter of opinion: whether viser in a ...


2

Bon (me, te, lui, etc...) semble must be seen as set phrase where sembler is used as an impersonal verb. This phrase can be modified by an adverb (comme, où, si...). I would say the whole can be considered as an adverbial phrase, no subject to be found here. As an adverbial phrase it modifies the verb déplacer in your sentence. A few examples: J'irai où ...


2

"Où bon < pronom coi > semble" is an idiom. It is also found in a form where the pronoun is replaced by a noun preceded by "à", but it is rather rarely used nowadays. (ref. 1958) […] libéralisme restreint par l'obligation de prendre ses blés où bon semble à l'O.N.I.C. (TLFi) Si/comme/qui/que... bon (me, te...) semble. Si/comme... ...


3

Google Translate is not a dictionary. Nevertheless, mettre sur une fiche means precisely "to file". A collection of fiches is un fichier, i.e. a file. Despite the different wording, the Collins gives all meanings. The Cambridge only shows one indeed but I expect that most free online dictionaries are abridged versions of paper based ones, or only ...


11

Ficher can have several meanings but it is not a verb we would use very much except for the colloquial use. 1- The oldest and primary meaning of ficher is faire entrer par la pointe, it comes from Latin figere which means "to plant", "to fix". Its past participle is regular: fiché. It is not used much, I can't say why, other verbs are ...


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