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33

This sentence is usually a reply to a remark, typically: — Tu es petite ! — Je suis petite, moi ? The remark is repeated to confirm what has been heard or understood, and moi ? is a way to state a strong disagreement and/or surprise. That would correspond to the English: — You are small! — Me? small ? (i.e. Are you sure you are talking about me?) The ...


9

"Je ne bois pas de vin" is a generic statement : I don't drink wine, I don't like the taste. It's often said alone, you don't really need to add what you drink instead (and you probably don't always drink apple juice every time other people drink wine. "Je ne bois pas du vin" refers to what you have in your glass right now : I'm not drinking wine, it's just ...


9

Your sentence is perfectly correct, but you could use the alternative: L'idée même d'un vêtement bizarre n'existe pas dans l'esprit londonien. The difference is mostly stylistic, there is no real difference in meaning. It could be translated word-by-word to "the very idea of strange clothes doesn't exist in the londonian spirit."


8

Je ne mange pas tant (de pommes) Je ne mange pas tant (de pommes) que ça Je ne mange pas autant (de pommes) Je ne mange pas autant (de pommes) que ça Je ne mange pas à ce point The bolded ones are the most common ones.


7

The idiomatic phrasing is: Comment se fait-il que … ? For some reason the clause is usually in the subjunctive mood. In this case: Comment se fait-il que je sois arrivé avant toi ? It could however be in the indicative, I suppose, when the fact is more important than the reason. Comment se fait-il que ces poules ont des dents ?


6

Comme / Que je suis stupide ! Comme / Que j'ai de la chance d'avoir survécu ! Informal: Qu'est-ce que je suis stupide ! Qu'est-ce que j'ai de la chance d'avoir survécu !


6

There are two issues that can lead to misunderstanding when translating your sentence. In modern French viande is used to describe any meat that is not seafood. Moreover seafood doesn't translate to fruits de mer because the latter doesn't include fish, only shellfish. You might thus say: Je ne mange pas de viande, seulement du poisson et des fruits de ...


6

The word order would not vary much, but the word choice would likely vary, as well as the tone. General guidelines concerning the tone change would be the pitch getting higher, the volume getting louder, and potentially the speed of elocution getting faster. Somewhat similar as English, but remember always to emphasize more on the last syllable in French. ...


6

The "lui" is not necessary, but it goes with the "aussi" to give more emphasis on the person, and it is better like this. I know it doesn't translate like this in English, but it would be something like "him too". The meaning is that she was very distant, and her boyfriend was also very distant. If you just say "aussi", there would be some ambiguity about ...


5

The sentences mean different things. Je ne bois pas du vin, mais du jus de pomme. translates best to English as What I am drinking isn't wine, it's apple juice. On the other hand, Je ne bois pas de vin, mais du jus de pomme. translates best to English as I don't drink wine, but [I do drink] apple juice. The negated partitive article ...


5

If the idea (and not just the thing behind the idea) that you’re referring to has been mentioned earlier, you could perhaps further emphasize the “no such idea” notion with "Une telle idée (d’un vêtement bizarre) n'existe même pas." (example of usage from ‘Psychiatrische en Neurologische Bladen, Volume 5’ via ‘Google Books’) To fit “un tel/une telle” (...


5

About n'existe même pas, the expression matches "there is no such thing" (more precisely "doesn't even exist"). I would have preferred this slightly modified sentence: L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre n’existe même pas dans l'esprit d'un londonien. or L’idée qu'un vêtement puisse être bizarre ne viendrait même pas à l'esprit d'un londonien.


5

In an informal setting, I assume most French people would say: Mais qu'est-ce que je suis con !


5

If you have taken a Spanish course, you know that "nosotros" is the first person plural pronoun. In Spain, similarly, "vosotros" is the familiar second person pronoun. This parallels the "nous-autres" construction. The construction is not common in France due to the promotion of the Parisian dialect as the standard, but I'm guessing it was far more common, ...


4

Cette construction est utilisée pour mettre en relief ou souligner le nom «La France». Cela peut peut-être se ressembler à une apposition. Exemple: Moi, je l’ai fait sans l’aide de l’ordinateur. Ici, on souligne le pronom personnel, pour insister ou montrer que c’est «moi» qui a fait l’action. Dans votre exemple La France, elle a toujours... un ...


4

Est-ce que tu peux, toi? Lui, il va à Strasbourg. It's not needed, it's emphasis. Sometimes, it could be a reproach: Il lui achète des fleurs, lui. = Lui, Il lui achète des fleurs Elle fait bien la cuisine, elle = Elle, elle fait bien la cuisine For your last point, 'Lui' is a pronoun Je donne le sel à Fred Je lui donne le sel.


4

« D'où vient que » était courant autrefois, au moins en français écrit (donc cultivé), mais est désuet. On utilise plutôt « comment se fait-il que » ou tout simplement « pourquoi » lorsqu'il s'agit de poser une question, ou « d'où » ou « c'est pourquoi » au style indirect.


4

I think a direct translation of "There's no such thing" would be "Il n'y a rien de tel", and so you might say, En fait, il n'y a rien de tel dans l'esprit d'un londonien. Or synonyms of tel include pareil and semblable.


4

I'd say: Je veux que ce soit lui qui me fasse un massage.


4

You can suppose that "Je suis petite, moi ?" comes as a reply to a personal remark, although it may not always be the case. For example, it would be correct to say "Je suis petite, moi ?" if you hear a politician saying that all women are small. It doesn't necessarily have to be directly directed at you, but using the "moi" is there to show that you ...


3

This emphasizes an opposition. It is especially clear with the 3rd example, where the British are opposed to the French. For instance, the last example implies that while the big ones go through the cracks, it is not the case of the small ones.


3

That particular expression is quite a fixed familiar/popular way to say : "Est-ce que ce n'est pas malheureux", "Isn't it a shame". "Pas" is in no way per se an expression of irony. Eventual irony would be reinforced though by the popular character of the sentence, generated by eliminating the "ne" in the negation "ne ... pas" (as well, generally speaking,...


3

By changing your sentence order : Je ne mange aucune viande sauf des produits de la mer. I don't eat any meat but seafood. and adding adverb : Je ne mange aucune autre viande, seulement des produits de la mer. I don't eat any other meat, only seafood. By accentuating while saying it : Parent: Pourquoi n'as-tu pas sorti ...


3

C'est un pléonasme (une répétition), pour renforcer encore plus sur qui porte l'action (faire du tort). Ce n'est pas obligatoire. On peut dire simplement: Tu te faisais du tort. (qui remplace : tu faisais du tort à toi, qu'on ne devrait pas employer). Tu faisais du tort à toi-même. (insistance).


3

En disant "pas moins de 745 brevets", on dit que l'entreprise a déposé exactement 745 brevets, et on met l'accent sur le fait que c'est beaucoup (sous entendu, "on pourrait penser que c'est moins, mais en fait c'est 745 !"). En disant "n'a pas déposé moins de 745 brevets", on ne connait pas le nombre exact de brevets déposés, et cette formulation serait ...


3

It sounds very acceptable to me, the pleonastic phrasing in this case gives a slightly humorous tone, and stresses that this is just the very beginning of something. I would still refrain from using it in formal writing. As you suggest, the other way round ("semblant de début") is also acceptable. You can even add more nouns to stress even further the idea ...


3

For tone, those four italicized sentences would work just as well in French. Il a volé le portefeuille. Il a volé le portefeuille. Il a volé le portefeuille. Il a volé le portefeuille. (emphasize le too) The second part I don't get. I would emphasize it this way, personally: C'est lui qui a volé le portefeuille. Voler! Il a volé le portefeuille. Ce qu'il ...


2

Shorter than previous answers: Mais quel idiot/abruti/con ! (idiot = neutral, abruti = familiar, con = vulgar) Even shorter: Quel idiot/abruti/con ! Even shorter than shorter: L'idiot/L'abruti/Le con ! You can replace idiot with imbécile (neutral). Note: As you are not explicitly saying "I (je)", these sentences can work on other people too.


2

In French you could use the following frame: Ce que [je suis bête] (alors)!


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