5

Franchement, y'en a, j'te dis pas !


4

La formule « c'était il y a longtemps » est beaucoup utilisée, et elle sonne mieux que « ça a été il y a longtemps », qui n'est pas très belle, et pas correcte. À la place, tu peux dire « ça s'est passé il y a longtemps », ce serait à peu près la même chose. « C'était il y a longtemps » implique qu'on décrit une action qui était en train de se faire, sans ...


4

In French, this pronounciation often goes along with y in written text (I think of “oyez” and “royal”), you can use that if you want to describe it. It's also the pronunciation of -ille in French, which forces the i out of any bigram it could form with the preceding vowel, as in “paille” (and arguably, in “corbeille”). I have the feeling there's something ...


3

En France on se jette la vaisselle à la figure. Comme quoi la vaisselle doit être souvent un sujet fréquent de dispute. Mais l'expression a largement dépassé le cadre de la cuisine ! après sept années de concubinage, les héros de la mini-série de France 2 Un gars, une fille, viennent en effet de se jeter la vaisselle à la figure et Chouchou est repartie ...


2

Lol I'm having the same issue but with the difference that I'm a native Spanish speaker who is perfectly fluent in English. I've been learning for a month now (almost exclusively French/English) and just today I started doing exercises in French/Spanish. I must say, at the very beginning it was quite handy knowing Spanish because of the phrase structure, ...


2

As for "Honestly, some people!" (said irritatedly), I would like to throw Ah, les gens ! into the ring. Not because it's better than the other renditions, but because it's closer to the original. As above, you may add "j'te jure" ("I'm telling ya.") or any equivalent amplifier for effect. Selected web-search results: BirdsDessinés: Ah les gens ...


1

That's a very dubious assertion; I know for certain that speaking French fluently is not going to make a conversation in Spanish intelligible at all to you, nor one either in Portugese or Italian. It must be taken very generally: you'll find often the same latin roots but that's about all in the way of a solid similarity. For instance, whereas in French ...


1

I don't think one should see it as an either/or thing. Rather use your knowledge of both English and Spanish along with the cognitive ability to learn a new language (which you have already demonstrated in fact). Of course your speed will be faster given that you are already aware of things like the subjunctive and latin roots.


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