9

"Je ne doute point" is another way of saying "je ne doute pas". It is a negative, it is very formal and sounds old fashioned nowadays but might have been standard French is the 16th century.


8

The wider definition of the écriture inclusive includes several writing changes. I believe the main one the Académie is warning against is the reintroduction of a ancient sign (the interpunct) to coin words representing both genders or singular/plural, e.g.: Les grand·e·s élect·eur·ice·s sont élu·e·s à la majorité des suffrages exprimés. The issue is ...


7

It depends on how you count. If you count every word in a dictionary once, you will get a higher score for Greek words; a very infrequently used word will count as 1 just like a very frequently used word, and there will be many more Greek words among the infrequently used words. Then you'd get the following numbers, from Laure's comment below; they don't ...


6

French is Latin mispronounced by German. The Wikipedia article has a longer story. The French Wikipedia article has a much longer, more complete story. A vast majority of French words come from Latin. A small number of common words come from (proto-) German. (See Language of Franks vs later French for a bit of historical background.) This is the foundation ...


5

The scan you posted seems to be from a later reprint. Here is the same sentence from the 1710 edition of the Mémoires d'Anne d'Autriche : There is an additional archaism compared to your sample, savoir has the older spelling scavoir. However, à peu près is written the usual way. Laffemas avait promis au Ministre qu'il le tourmenterait si bien qu'il en ...


4

"Je m'en fais la répétition" here simply means "I repeat them". "En", standing for "the words". The construction of the sentence is akward in French, as is in fact all that Catherine says in French in the play. Nobody would speak like Shakespeare has Catherine speak in the play. I expect it is as much because French has changed since the 16th century and ...


4

To build upon @oldergod's answer: Though the quote is often attributed to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, it is always unsourced (not attached to a book). As oldergod found out, the quote appears first in Fénélon's Les aventures de Télémaque (1699) as follows: Les injures sont les raisons de ceux qui ont tort. This work is known to have influenced Rousseau's ...


4

The expression qu'il n'y avait que faire is an old style, literary equivalent to qu'il n'y avait rien à faire, i.e. there was he had1 nothing (interesting) to do. TLFi − N'avoir que faire de N'avoir nul besoin de. Le valet n'a que faire de certaines vertus du maître : elles ne lui conviennent pas plus que le thym et la marjolaine à nos lapins de choux ...


3

I think it is a mild imprecation, just as when you would say in English of ages past, "Confound me", "Confound the day you were born", etc. It is unusual to find the inversion "subject/verb" and not to find "que" but this inversion adds no extra meaning. One finds more often "Que le ciel te confonde".


3

Il semblerait que ce ne soit pas de Rousseau mais de Fénelon, Les aventures de Télémaque.


2

It is a pity that Greek origin words in French are not mentioned as such. They are mostly referred to as Latin and it is really difficult for the researcher to trace back a word into its Greek origin.But the truth cannot be denied.Thousands of words used in European languages come from Greek through Latin .And the wonderful thing is that it is not just the ...


2

Some recent knowledge I happened upon courtesy of @Gilles leads me to guess that tourmenteroit is an archaic conditional conjugation of tourmenter, and thus the opening words mean "Laffernas had promised the Minister that he would torment him if..." As for a-peu-pres, it is almost certainly an old-fashioned way of writing the modern à peu près, meaning "...


1

What you assume loosely is exactly what you should understand in my opinion. It seems to me that this usage of "que" is none other than "que" as "quoi" or more exactly "de quoi", "quelque chose", which persists nowadays in certain turns; this analysis makes then of "que" an indefinite pronoun and not a pronoun in indirect interrogative use¹ as the TLFi would ...


1

Trying to look can be translated as Essayer d'avoir l'air. But for the second part, it depends of the context: "in foreign language", does that mean you're doing as if you could talk it, pretending to be fluent, or you want to express the language you're using? If it's the latter, it would be something like: J'essaye d'avoir cool en parlant Anglais. ...


1

The ancient conjugation of the imparfait used "oi" instead of "ai". So, we said, "je mangeois, tu mangeois, il mangeoit...". Moreover, "oi" was not pronouced "[oua]" as it is today, but "[ouè]". It is said that once, Louis XVI's brother, who came back from a long exile in England to replace Napoleon after Waterloo and restore the ancient kingdom under the ...


1

After having delivered hasty and thus unprecise analyses, I have calmly considered the problem you raised: It shows you're quite keen at French, because indeed you detected a mistake: I can affirm that, in that sentence, Alexandre Dumas effectively made a mistake (but after all, the law "errare humanum est" can apply even to a great author, can't it?). ...


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