38

The partitive article will still be needed, even in short sentences. Even if you are not actually "talking" but only "thinking in your head". In the desert, you would indeed beg for De l'eau ! De l'eau ! even in your head. I can imagine a speaker would say Eau ! Eau ! only if he is about to faint and cannot speak properly, so this is ...


33

This sentence is usually a reply to a remark, typically: — Tu es petite ! — Je suis petite, moi ? The remark is repeated to confirm what has been heard or understood, and moi ? is a way to state a strong disagreement and/or surprise. That would correspond to the English: — You are small! — Me? small ? (i.e. Are you sure you are talking about me?) The ...


30

There can be a slight difference between the two sentences. For example, answering a question about his profession, you would use il est: — Quelle est sa profession ? — Il est avocat. But answering a question about who this person is, you would use c'est un: — Qui est cette personne ? — C'est un avocat.


28

First, a correction: "est-ce que" comes before yes/no questions. "qu'est-ce que" or "qu'est-ce qui" (depending on if the "what" in the question is the object or subject, respectively) comes before what questions. It's usually best not to try to directly equate phrasings of one language to phrasings of another. What "est-ce que" really "means" is that "what'...


26

The crux of your question is in the sentence: From what I understood, Il est means He is. But, Why does it mean It is? The fact is that in French there is no “it”. The only French grammatical genders are masculine (applied to male people and animals, and to part of inanimate objects, such as le manteau, il) or feminine (for female people and animals, and ...


22

Both “Je ne sais pas quoi dire” and “Je ne sais quoi dire” are correct translations for “I don’t know what to say”. With most verbs, skipping the “pas” sounds dated, but with “savoir”, not so much; still, the version with the “pas” probably remains more usual in everyday conversation. However, the English “je ne sais quoi” (no “pas”!) actually comes from ...


21

In English you is used as subject and object personal pronoun but in French we use different words accordingly. Tu is always subject: Tu parles. Où vas-tu ? Que manges-tu ? Te is always object: Direct object: Je te vois. Je t'aime. (note the elision in front of the vowel) Or indirect object: Je te donne un livre. Je te pose une ...


21

Using all six of them, you can say, for instance: Rien ni personne ne pourrait plus jamais me faire croire en aucune de ses belles paroles. À partir de maintenant, je vais m'efforcer de ne plus jamais rien devoir à personne en aucun cas, ni dans ma vie personnelle ni dans ma vie professionnelle. Practically speaking, it is not common to see five or ...


20

“Parce que” is always followed by a clause with a verb in standard French. I'm not aware of any difference in Québec French compared to France French. There is a somewhat uncommon colloquial usage where “parce que” can be followed by a noun or a short noun clause. This is very similar to what can happen in English with “because”. I mention this for ...


19

In formal language, affirmations have subject – verb – object complements order and yes/no questions have verb – subject – object complements order. So, Vous êtes beau is an affirmation. Êtes-vous beau ? is a yes/no question. (If the subject is not already a pronoun, it comes first and a pronoun is added after the verb to form questions. E.g. Pierre est-il ...


19

The other answers have already noted that the y there is originally about a location. I'd like to point out the difference with and without that y. The sentence je n'y vois rien means that something is preventing you from seeing anything around you, be it darkness, heavy rain, blindness... and has become set in that meaning. ―Il fait complètement noir ...


19

Bonhomme a une grammaire particulière car formé par agglutination d'un adjectif et un nom commun. Contrairement à bonheur qui suit le même schéma (bon + heur=chance, destin), le nom commun bonhomme prend normalement la marque du pluriel pour ses deux composants (mais pas les bonsheurs). On retrouve le même schéma avec un gentilhomme / des gentilshommes et ...


18

Il faut en premier lieu comprendre les phénomènes d'élision et de contraction qui sont à l'œuvre et qui sont indépendants du rôle ou de la nature du mot « de » dans la phrase : « de » s'élide en « d' » devant un son voyelle. « de » suivi de l'article défini masculin « le » se contracte toujours en « du », sauf devant un son voyelle où l'élision est ...


18

"Je peux t'en prêter 5$" n'est pas correct, mais "je peux t'en prêter 5" l'est, et implique que l'unité a été évoquée avant. Par exemple : "Peux-tu me prêter 10$ ? — Non, mais je peux t'en prêter 5." "Je peux te prêter 5$" quant à lui est correct, et n'impose pas de parler de l'unité avant. Par exemple : "Peux tu me prêter de l'argent ? - Oui, je peux te ...


18

The gender of letters is masculine nowadays but that wasn't always the case for some consonants, including m. TLFi Rem. Les noms désignant les lettres f, h, l, m, n, r, s sont traditionnellement féminins (il s'agit des noms en -e : effe, ache, elle, emme, enne, erre, esse, d'apr. la transcr. orth. ds Lar. 20e). On commence par attribuer le genre masc. ...


18

Technically, the sentence is missing a comma: Tu l'as acheté où, ce pantalon ? To parse it, better to first ignore the trailing part that is optional. That reads: Tu l'as acheté où ? or the variants où tu l'as acheté ? and où l'as-tu acheté ? (formal) This clearly translates to Where did you buy it? But the person speaking wants to make sure you know ...


18

Your analysis is fine. It is grammatically incorrect. It should be "Rester chez soi" (infinitive), or "Restez chez vous".


18

« Les noms désignant des régions (continents, pays, provinces, départements, etc.), des montagnes, des mers ou des lacs, des cours d'eau » prennent « ordinairement » l'article défini sauf que « pour les noms de cours d'eau, il reste des traces de l'ancien usage » (LBU) : En ancien français, on employait généralement sans article les noms de régions ou de ...


17

In the oldest time, you could have the "strong" form non, hence nonobstant, nonchalant, non-recevoir... But the most common form of the negation was in fact ne alone. Eventually emphatic elements were added, which varied depending on context: Je ne mange mie ("I don't eat a crumb"), je ne vois goutte ("I can't see a drop [of water]"), je n'avance pas ("I don'...


17

Ta is generally used for feminine nouns and ton for masculine nouns… but before a vowel sound, ta is never used. In French hiatuses are commonly avoided by resorting to elisions or other grammatical artifices. Thus, “ton image”, pronounced /tɔ̃.n‿i.maʒə/, just like “ton idée”, “ton ubiquité”, “ton histoire”… Similarly the possessive articles ma and sa ...


17

Être + en train + de + the infinitive of the verb is the french structure of the english progressive form : To be + gerund. The progressive form is used to express an ongoing action. Ex: Je me prépare. Je suis en train de me préparer. I am getting ready. Ex: L'avion atterrit. L'avion est en train d'atterrir. The plane is landing. Ex: Nous déjeunions. ...


17

Your assumption is wrong, Je lui ai enlevé means something like I removed (something) from him/her. "I kidnapped her" can be translated by Je l'ai enlevée (note the final e).


17

All verbs that use the reflexive pronoun are pronominal, and all use être for the auxiliary in compound tenses. Ad-hoc pronominals like se pincer can be formed with pretty much any transitive verb and function the same grammatically. The reason a pronominal verb appears in the dictionary is usually that its meaning is not completely transparent given the ...


16

Etymologically, ici designates a nearby place and là designates a faraway place. (Latin had three gradations; ici comes from the nearmost one (hic), là from the furthest one (illac)). However, là has evolved in French in such a way that it is often neutral with respect to distance. In particular, être là means to be present somewhere, regardless of whether ...


16

In a full sentence (ie, with a verb), if the body part is preceded by a possessive adjective "ses/son/sa/leur/leurs", it means that the body part does not belong to the body of the subject (note: this is true for "correct" French: in relaxed speech, speakers may tend to use a possessive article indifferently. This is for instance a ...


15

L'utilisation de l'article défini dans ce contexte est similaire à son utilisation classique : il indique que l'élément qu'il précède est un exemplaire précis, connu par le contexte. Prenons comme exemple : « C'est une clé de la porte. » et « C'est une clé de porte. » Dans le premier cas, la clé ouvre une porte bien précise : celle dont on est en train de ...


15

« Du » est la contraction de « de le ». Quand on devrait dire ou écrire « de le » et que « le » est un article, on utilise en fait « du ». Ce n’est pas un choix, cette contraction est obligatoire, qu'il s'agisse d'un article partitif ou d'une préposition de suivie par l'article le. La voiture de Jacques La voiture de la juge *La voiture de le ...


15

The usage is to replace "des" by "de" in the negative form when expressing an absence (zero vs some). Il n'y a pas de touristes, [il n'y a personne]. Il n'a pas de frères. On the other hand, when opposing two statements, even if the second one in not expressed, "des" is kept. With "être", the opposition is implicit: ...


15

"C'est un piment rouge" implies that you are speaking about a whole red pepper whereas "C'est du piment rouge" implies a more vague amount of pepper. It's the equivalent of "It's red pepper" vs "It's a red pepper".


15

Personnellement je dis : Je suis content que tu l’aies aimé. Je n'ai pas souvenir d'avoir entendu dans mon entourage quelqu'un utiliser l'indicatif dans ce genre de phrase. Mais, bien que Français, je ne suis pas forcement représentatif.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible