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6

The term "paleoburrow" started spreading more largely around 2010 when geologists discovered the first such burrows in Brazil and forged the Portuguese word paleotocas as a word for word translation from English (tocas → tunnel/burrow)1. But it looks as if the word hasn't yet got an acknowledged translation in French. I haven't found a scientific ...


-1

Paleo is paleon in French, yet I've never heard of such a word which would be a mix of the previous with Burrow (or something else that means hole, tunnel, etc.). We would most probably use two words or a full sentence to say that in French. But I think I have the answer you are looking for : terrier. It means the same thing physically, but the difference is ...


1

There seems to be no specific term, and these lairs would be referred to often as "tunnels". Ces tunnels creusés il y a 10 000 ans seraient l’oeuvre de paresseux géants In this second article the term used is "terrier", which is a more specific term ("burrow", "hole", in English). Ulyces Quite conceivably, then, those ...


3

1- When was the word "ambigu" first used with the sense of "meal with all items served at the same time"? The word ambigu used as a noun meaning Repas où l'on sert à la fois les viandes et le dessert can be found before the date mentioned in the question (1751) since we find it in the Mémoire de la vie du comte de Gramont that was ...


0

My fourth great grandfather Colonel the Baron George Frederick Wilhelm von Pfeiltizer genannt Franck, a Russian Courland Prussian officer and Pour le Merit winner who had been drafted by the Duke of York held one of these parties. It was called a déjeuné à l'ambigu held in Cheltenham in 1810. His military service had been in the French language as de ...


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