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Where should a pronoun go when the verb is followed by an infinitive clause?

From what you have written I expect you know the rule that says that when the direct object is a pronoun, it must be placed before the verb. J'améliore la peinture → Je l'améliore. I suppose you ...
None's user avatar
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11 votes

What is the rule behind the use of "de" in this sentence?

The word "de" in French is used for many different things that have nothing in common most of the time -- you should not try to look for a common sense between these usages. In particular it ...
Anne Aunyme's user avatar
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11 votes
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“Après de” doesn’t seem right?

Avant and Après actually aren't symmetrical, après behaves a little differently. You can only say "Après [quelque chose*]" or "Après que [sujet + verbe]". The "quelque chose*&...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
10 votes

What is the rule behind the use of "de" in this sentence?

By the way, your sentence: Il n'est pas difficile de comprendre pourquoi le samedi est ma journée favorite. is translated this way in English: It's not hard to understand why Saturday is my ...
BBBreiz's user avatar
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9 votes
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What is the grammar of "I watch you speaking French" vs "I want you to speak French"?

Pattern 1 and pattern 2 are different. Let's start with pattern 2 which is simpler. Here the basic construction is a clause which is used as a component of another sentence. For example: Je veux que ...
Gilles 'SO nous est hostile''s user avatar
9 votes
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"Viens nous voir dimanche !"

There are two verbs following one another venir and voir. Only the first one is conjugated, here venir in the imperative. The rule is that the second one must be in the infinitive, you never ...
None's user avatar
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8 votes
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The present infinitive as a noun

Your question calls for a distinction between the verb in the infinitive that remains a verb when used in the grammatical place of a noun and the "infinitif substantivé". The infinitive ...
None's user avatar
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8 votes
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"Ça énerve, d'attendre" ?

Ignoring intonation and punctuation for a moment, there's two structures in French that can produce a surface form like "Ça énerve d'attendre": The first is an impersonal construction, where ...
Eau qui dort's user avatar
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7 votes
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Difference between « Toi pas rester » and « Ne reste pas »

Toi pas rester dans mes pattes. This is an ironic structure, where the idea is to simplify the structure to be sure the other person will understand what you mean (the use of infinitive is the ...
Random's user avatar
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7 votes
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Which pronoun to replace an infinitive?

« Je le veux » is actually okay to my ears, though not idiomatic according to the native speakers who have weighed in. Arguably this le wouldn't replace the infinitive but whatever substantive is ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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7 votes
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What's the difference between: 'Je ne peux pas venir' and 'Je peux ne pas venir'?

The most usual sentence: Tu ne peux pas venir means : You cannot come. The one you quote: Tu peux ne pas venir is less used (but perfectly understood in France), its meaning is : You can decide ...
XouDo's user avatar
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6 votes

The present infinitive as a noun

For example, can a present infinitive serve as subject of a sentence? ("To be or not to be, that is the question.") . How is (a) or (b) again different from de + infinitive as found, for ...
Eau qui dort's user avatar
  • 9,879
6 votes

“Après de” doesn’t seem right?

Yes, après de sortir is incorrect while avant de sortir is not. The de is almost always mandatory between avant and an infinitive. Historically, French started by using no preposition between avant ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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6 votes

Why is danser not conjugated in "Je regarde Anna danser" ?

Je regarde Anna danser. Je regarde = proposition principale Anna danser = proposition infinitive In this type of sentences the verb in la proposition principale is usually a verb of perception (...
lmc's user avatar
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6 votes
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Les infinitifs en argot

This is a shitposting trend that consists in translating memes literally. It can be funny because sentences make no sense but you can still "reverse translate" back to the original meaning. ...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
6 votes

Why do pronouns sometimes precede infinitives when infinitives are used as imperative?

C'est une traduction erronée. Ce devrait être : Veuillez vous assoir ici. Voire, éventuellement : Asseyez-vous ici.
Toto's user avatar
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6 votes

Apparente erreur dans l'écriture de l'infinitif « ficher »

Comment expliquer cette anomalie ? Le verbe fiche ne comporte pas de R à l'infinitif quand il est utilisé comme euphémisme pour foutre. Une hypothèse serait de dire que cet infinitif singulier permet ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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Understanding "de" in "plus facile, cependant, que de remuer le soleil"

1- In the sentence Il est facile de parler français. facile is an attribut complément du verbe, de parler français is a complément d'objet indirect. It's the same construction in English: It ...
Gwen's user avatar
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5 votes

Understanding "de" in "plus facile, cependant, que de remuer le soleil"

What is its grammatical or syntactic function? (For example, is there a de-infinitive similar to the English to-infinitive?) Not that similar but there should be a preposition between an adjective ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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« Savoir que » plus infinitif

Que est ici un équivalent soutenu de quoi qui n'est possible que parce que pas est omis. Une version plus courante est : Je ne sais pas quoi vous dire, Mademoiselle !
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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"Tu ne devrais pas fumer" contre "Tu devrais ne pas fumer"

La première est idiomatique. On y déconseille de fumer : Tu ne devrais pas fumer. Dans la deuxième phrase on recommande de ne pas fumer. (?) Tu devrais ne pas fumer. C'est compréhensible et ne ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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How do you say "I can drive us to the cottage" in French?

In declarative clauses with no inversion, object pronouns, in French, precede the verbs to which they are attached. This may be observed in phrases such as "s'il vous plaît" (if it pleases you). In ...
Maroon's user avatar
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5 votes

Which pronoun to replace an infinitive?

Sorry if I didn't get your query. What is wrong with the following reply? Pourquoi est-ce que tu veux voyager ? (Juste) pour visiter de nouveaux pays. You avoid repeating voyager. There is indeed ...
Dimitris's user avatar
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5 votes

Which pronoun to replace an infinitive?

Je le veux is not technically wrong but is not idiomatic in this context. It is somewhat too formal and too strong, and only used in occasions where it implies a strong commitment, often religious, ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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il me faut le faire (why not "de le faire")

The grammatical rule is il faut + infinitive verb. In your example, Il me faut le faire uses faire as a complementary infinitive (l'infinitif complément) of another verb, il faut. Il faut (verbe ...
livresque's user avatar
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5 votes
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« Tu aurais dû me le laisser faire » ou « Tu aurais dû me laisser le faire » ?

Both are valid but usage strongly differ. The second form: Tu aurais du me laisser le faire. is by far the most common one. It can be used whatever the language register. The first form: Tu aurais ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
5 votes

à te regarder = en te regardant ? (à + infinitif -> gérondif)

Grammaticalement les 2 formes sont correctes, et le sens reste voisin. Mais à mon avis, il y a une différence un peu subtile : en te regardant insiste sur la circonstance, la simultanéité, on ...
Serge Ballesta's user avatar

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