19

Don't confuse avoir les boules (because of sth) and avoir les couilles (to do sth). The latter matches to have the balls / the guts. In the former one, the boules are more the glandes (the expression avoir les glandes exists too). Despite being originally the same balls we were referring to earlier, these glandes/boules are generally understood nowadays ...


15

In the context of memes, you will say something like "quand j'évite les problèmes". Here, the adverb "quand" highlights the same idea of an action as the BE-ing present. Here is an example: "Quand j'apprends que la fête est annulée"


15

Personnellement je dis : Je suis content que tu l’aies aimé. Je n'ai pas souvenir d'avoir entendu dans mon entourage quelqu'un utiliser l'indicatif dans ce genre de phrase. Mais, bien que Français, je ne suis pas forcement représentatif.


12

One way to say it can be tout craché (like in spitting image): C'est la France tout craché. (possibly: C'est la France toute crachée) C'est du « Oh, je suis mieux que toi » tout craché. Some alternatives are: C'est exactement xxx. (e.g. la France) Ça sent xxx à plein nez. (e.g. la France) C'est typiquement xxx. (e.g. français) Keeping the "scream&...


11

The verb niquer matches quite well the various meanings of fuck and belongs to the same register. Fuck studying! : Nique les études ! Fuck that! : Nique cette merde ! Fuck him! : Nique sa race ! Fuck your ideas! : Nique tes idées ! In this kind of sentences, niquer is however less widely used than fuck in English, and more popular among younger people, ...


10

Toto has answered your question accurately, here I would like to go further and say that not only subjunctive actually is used in informal contexts, but in those situations it is even overused. The most common situation is after the locution après que: e.g., Après que je sois parti... is incorrect but extremely widespread. The correct wording is: ...


10

Rather than avoir l'air, in your examples, the verb faire means donner un air, donner une apparence, as the subject is not the thing that has the appearance, but is what gives this appearance. This the definition nr. 19 given here in the Wiktionary. Ex: J'aime bien porter un smoking, ça fait classe (porter le smoking donne un air classe). Ne porte pas de ...


9

For your first question: the most common informal word is télé, a colloquial contraction of the word télévision (no need to define this one). Erratum: the word is actually probably téloche, many thanks to @Laurent S. who pointed this out in his answer. This indeed seems like a French Homer Simpson thing to say, from what I remember from when I was watching ...


8

The translation for each would be pas vrai - no way (when being astonished, not very formal) or right (common) c'est ça - is that it (common) n'est-il pas - isn't it (formal) "Hein" doesn't really have a translation, it's widely used for a lot of things. But to answer you, there's is no real word to use, they all depend on the context in which you're ...


8

Yes, c'est-à-dire is a good translation. It's not necessarily formal, especially when pronounced c'tà-dire. Il a dit qu'il allait être en retard, c'est-à-dire qu'il dort Je veux que tu fasses tes devoirs maintenant, c'est-à-dire tout de suite. Another option, less formal, to connote a bit more the sarcasm of your examples, would be donc en fait, which ...


8

Archi exprime une idée de superlatif (cette expression est archi utilisée) et est principalement utilisé pour exprimer un rang hiérarchique supérieur (archidruide, archevêque…) Trop exprime une idée de grandeur mais qui dépasse une limite, plus qu'il n'en faudrait (je n'en peux plus, c'en est trop !) Hyper indique un niveau supérieur (hypersonique) ou un ...


8

Comme par hasard (or the variant comme de par hasard - considered as faulty but still used, sometimes for a humorous effect) would rather fit as an ironical comment in situations where you suspect someone has a hidden agenda and you rather think there is no hasard (in the sens of coincidence). -Je suis désolé, j'ai oublié mon portefeuille. -Comme par hasard ...


8

I'm a big Simpson fan and I'm quite sure Homer uses the word "téloche", which is a bit outdated but some episodes are almost 30 years old so that's not entirely surprising. Please note I'm talking about French version in France or Belgium. The French-Canadian version might be different.


7

• Fuck studying! : Merde aux études ! • Fuck that! : Merde à tout ça ! • Fuck him! : Qu'il aille se faire foutre ! • Fuck your ideas! : Merde à vos/tes idées !


7

"hein?" is a very informal sound-word. It is used a bit like the Canadian "eh?" at the end of sentences. It can also be used like the English "what?" to mark surprise, disbelief. -On se voit à quinze heures, hein? -Ouaip! -C'est possible que l'univers soit un hologramme. -Hein?! /Quoi?! "pas vrai?" is an informal way of asking for ...


7

Here are some suggestions but of course there may be plenty of other possibilities: Very usual (at the restaurant, for example): C'était très bon, merci. Tout s'est bien passé, merci. Common, but more familiar: Je me suis régalé ! Un vrai festin ! If it was really a great meal and you want to show it, you can add Mes compliments au chef, or Je ...


7

Both French and English can have ∅ objects when they're indefinite (Ils embauchent/ they're hiring, je mange là/I'm eating right now, etc). French also allows ∅ objects when they're generic, while English doesn't. When the object refers to a specific thing, the weak pronouns le/la/les are heavily favoured: Les pâtes, j'aime beaucoup (ça) (I like pasta a ...


6

It's an old derogatory word similar to "peasant". In modern French, péquenot (redneck) might be used with a similar meaning. In this song, croquants is definitely used to name peasants, and in this case relatively healthy and avaricious ones, as shows this verse: Les croquants vont en ville, à cheval sur leurs sous See the TLFi


6

Do people prefer to use on in everyday speaking, even in formal situations? On as a first person plural subject has almost replaced nous in everyday conversation but the more formal the context is, the more you'll hear nous. For example, if you are at a gathering and you say "Nous sommes si chanceux d'être ici". Would that express more formality than ...


6

I don't think there are a perfect translation. You can use "Apprends à X". But it can be a little mean, so use it carefully. You can use it with good friend when they fail to do something simple. Exemples : "Apprends à macher" "Apprends à manger" "Apprends à marcher"


6

That's a case where ou pas will perfectly fit, better than as a translation of "not jokes" for which it was accepted in an earlier question. Je t'ai apporté ce ce super jouet... ou pas... Je reste là... ou pas... Je ne vais pas vraiment partir... ou peut-être que si... (Here ou pas can't work because the main part is already negative.) Mamie a dit ...


5

A few come in mind : Grande folle (similar to drama queen, or diva) Mon chou (not the literal of cupcake, but definitely the same meaning) Mon chéri (honey) Ma grande ("my tall", but rather close to "my little one") Then, as you may (or may not) know, in France we're very vulgar, and there's a lot more that are meaner but are said anyway (results may ...


5

Dans un registre que j'utiliserais plus spontanément : • Fuck studying! = Putain d'études ! • Fuck that! = Merde ! • Fuck him! = Enculé ! • Fuck your ideas! = Va te faire enculer !


5

Unless there is a visible relationship with an already existing feminine French word, foreign words adopted in French are generally masculine and that's the case with un mème. Beware that not everyone is already familiar with that word in French, especially as it collides with même. See also French equivalent of the English “internet meme”?


4

I would use "j'emmerde" in each case but "fuck that": Fuck studying! = J'emmerde les études! Fuck that! = Rien à branler! (there are 1000 other way to express this) Fuck him! = Je l'emmerde! Fuck your ideas! = J'emmerde tes idées (it would be more natural to say "je t'emmerde, toi et tes putain d'idées") You can also replace "j'emmerde" par "j'encule" like ...


4

You can use this phrase:en clair. It conveys the idea that it introduces some sort of clarification, and yet is mildly sarcastic. The phrase en d'autres termes is also a valid alternative. Il a dit qu'il allait être en retard. En clair: il dort. Je voudrais que tu fasses bientôt tes devoirs, en d'autres termes, que tu les fasses maintenant.


4

When followed by an adjective or a noun (with no article) faire can indeed be synonym of avoir l'air/paraître. This particular meaning derives from one of the numerous meanings of faire. The Dictionnaire culturel en langue française lists six semantic groups for the meaning of faire: I. Réaliser (qqch. ou qqn), agir de manière à faire exister. (construire,...


4

Une formule un peu éloignée du sens de l'anglais mais qui me semble assez proche de l'idée attendue : ...et ils nous plantent un couteau dans le dos ! Aussi : ...et ils nous sortent un coup tordu comme ça !


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