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19 votes
Accepted

'Avoir les boules': submissive or aggressive

Don't confuse avoir les boules (because of sth) and avoir les couilles (to do sth). The latter matches to have the balls / the guts. In the former one, the boules are more the glandes (the ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
15 votes

How to translate “Me doing X” like in online posts?

In the context of memes, you will say something like "quand j'évite les problèmes". Here, the adverb "quand" highlights the same idea of an action as the BE-ing present. Here is an example: "...
purerstamp's user avatar
15 votes

Do French speakers not use the subjunctive informally?

Personnellement je dis : Je suis content que tu l’aies aimé. Je n'ai pas souvenir d'avoir entendu dans mon entourage quelqu'un utiliser l'indicatif dans ce genre de phrase. Mais, bien que Français,...
Toto's user avatar
  • 15k
12 votes

Comment traduire « That screams X »

One way to say it can be tout craché (like in spitting image): C'est la France tout craché. (possibly: C'est la France toute crachée) C'est du « Oh, je suis mieux que toi » tout craché. Some ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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11 votes

How do you say “Fuck + noun”?

The verb niquer matches quite well the various meanings of fuck and belongs to the same register. Fuck studying! : Nique les études ! Fuck that! : Nique cette merde ! Fuck him! : Nique sa race ! ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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10 votes

Do French speakers not use the subjunctive informally?

Toto has answered your question accurately, here I would like to go further and say that not only subjunctive actually is used in informal contexts, but in those situations it is even overused. The ...
joH1's user avatar
  • 426
10 votes

“Faire” being used to mean “avoir l’air”?

Rather than avoir l'air, in your examples, the verb faire means donner un air, donner une apparence, as the subject is not the thing that has the appearance, but is what gives this appearance. This ...
Greg's user avatar
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9 votes
Accepted

Informal words for tv set? Informal agreement?

For your first question: the most common informal word is télé, a colloquial contraction of the word télévision (no need to define this one). Erratum: the word is actually probably téloche, many ...
Reyedy's user avatar
  • 3,131
8 votes

Differences between “pas vrai ?”, “c’est ça ?”, “hein ?”, and “n’est-ce pas ?”

The translation for each would be pas vrai - no way (when being astonished, not very formal) or right (common) c'est ça - is that it (common) n'est-il pas - isn't it (formal) "Hein" doesn't really ...
Maryannah's user avatar
  • 600
8 votes
Accepted

“On” vs “nous” in spoken French

Do people prefer to use on in everyday speaking, even in formal situations? On as a first person plural subject has almost replaced nous in everyday conversation but the more formal the context is, ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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8 votes

How would you say “AKA/as in”?

Yes, c'est-à-dire is a good translation. It's not necessarily formal, especially when pronounced c'tà-dire. Il a dit qu'il allait être en retard, c'est-à-dire qu'il dort Je veux que tu fasses tes ...
qoba's user avatar
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8 votes

Archi vs trop vs hyper

Archi exprime une idée de superlatif (cette expression est archi utilisée) et est principalement utilisé pour exprimer un rang hiérarchique supérieur (archidruide, archevêque…) Trop exprime une idée ...
Francois Borgies's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Sarcastic “Surprise, surprise” equivalent for informal French?

Comme par hasard (or the variant comme de par hasard - considered as faulty but still used, sometimes for a humorous effect) would rather fit as an ironical comment in situations where you suspect ...
Greg's user avatar
  • 17.2k
8 votes

Informal words for tv set? Informal agreement?

I'm a big Simpson fan and I'm quite sure Homer uses the word "téloche", which is a bit outdated but some episodes are almost 30 years old so that's not entirely surprising. Please note I'm talking ...
Laurent S.'s user avatar
  • 5,239
8 votes

Pistes de traduction du « one-trick pony » ?

Pour exprimer le contraire, on dira il a plus d'une corde à son arc donc, logiquement, on peut aussi dire : Il n'a qu'une corde à son arc. Sinon, un peu plus proche du trick mais de sens plus ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
7 votes

Differences between “pas vrai ?”, “c’est ça ?”, “hein ?”, and “n’est-ce pas ?”

"hein?" is a very informal sound-word. It is used a bit like the Canadian "eh?" at the end of sentences. It can also be used like the English "what?" to mark surprise, disbelief. -On se voit à ...
BuggyMelon's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

How to answer "ça a été ?" ?

Here are some suggestions but of course there may be plenty of other possibilities: Very usual (at the restaurant, for example): C'était très bon, merci. Tout s'est bien passé, merci. Common, ...
Mistalis's user avatar
  • 1,856
7 votes
Accepted

When can you leave off “le/la” to say “it” in French?

Both French and English can have ∅ objects when they're indefinite (Ils embauchent/ they're hiring, je mange là/I'm eating right now, etc). French also allows ∅ objects when they're generic, while ...
Eau qui dort's user avatar
  • 9,879
7 votes
Accepted

Petite heure, bonne heure

Les adjectifs bon et petit sont très souvent utilisés pour exprimer une certaine intensité ou une certaine quantité. Quand je fais mon marché je dis souvent : Je voudrais un petit kilo d'oranges. ...
None's user avatar
  • 62.1k
6 votes
Accepted

Meaning of "croquant" when used figuratively

It's an old derogatory word similar to "peasant". In modern French, péquenot (redneck) might be used with a similar meaning. In this song, croquants is definitely used to name peasants, and in this ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
6 votes
Accepted

Equivalent for sarcastic question “X much?”

I don't think there are a perfect translation. You can use "Apprends à X". But it can be a little mean, so use it carefully. You can use it with good friend when they fail to do something simple. ...
Pylouface's user avatar
  • 126
6 votes
Accepted

Jokingly saying “Or am I?” or “Or did I?” and stuff like that?

That's a case where ou pas will perfectly fit, better than as a translation of "not jokes" for which it was accepted in an earlier question. Je t'ai apporté ce ce super jouet... ou pas... ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 150k
5 votes

How do you say “Fuck + noun”?

Dans un registre que j'utiliserais plus spontanément : • Fuck studying! = Putain d'études ! • Fuck that! = Merde ! • Fuck him! = Enculé ! • Fuck your ideas! = Va te faire enculer !
Gwen Brd's user avatar
  • 127
5 votes

What are some common expressions used by gay men in France?

A few come in mind : Grande folle (similar to drama queen, or diva) Mon chou (not the literal of cupcake, but definitely the same meaning) Mon chéri (honey) Ma grande ("my tall", but rather close ...
Maryannah's user avatar
  • 600
5 votes

“Faire” being used to mean “avoir l’air”?

When followed by an adjective or a noun (with no article) faire can indeed be synonym of avoir l'air/paraître. This particular meaning derives from one of the numerous meanings of faire. The ...
None's user avatar
  • 62.1k

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