8

The first part of split negatives (ne) tend to disappear in French, so c'est plus pareil is simply the spoken French version of ce n'est plus pareil ("it's no longer the same"). Here plus is enough to understand it is a negation, especially when hearing the sentence because its final S is not pronounced. There is then another c'est plus pareil ...


7

Partitive articles du, de la, de l' and des all become de or d' (in front of a vowel or mute h) in negative sentences using ne...pas, ne...jamais, ne...plus etc. This rule does NOT apply to sentences using the verb être and other Verbes d'état, with which the partitive article doesn't change. Indefinite articles un and une become de or d' (in front of a ...


7

Elle ne savait qu'entreprendre pour lui faire plaisir. Grammatically, the sentence is ambiguous. This sometimes happens with “ne … que”: usually, it means “only”, but sometimes, as here, it's the negation “ne” and an unrelated use of “que”. In modern French, “ne” is not used as a sole negation anymore except in increasingly rare literary contexts. So in ...


6

In addition to Dimitris' answer, beware that there are a few cases where the plural article can still be relevant in negations: On ne prend pas de vacances → We take no vacation (we stay at home/at work) On ne prend pas des vacances → What we are doing now is not taking vacation Je ne mange pas de pommes → I don't eat apples (because I don't like them) ...


5

Personne n'a le plus souvent de valeur négative que lorsqu'il est accompagné d'un ne ou employé seul (Qui est venu ? Personne). Par exemple dans la phrase : Personne n'a tué personne. le premier personne est négatif et correspond à no one/nobody alors que le deuxième personne ne l'est le plus souvent pas et correspond à anyone/anybody. Dans personne n'a ...


4

You shouldn't translate it word for word, Personne n'a faim means nobody is hungry. Personne is the negative form (négation) of tout(s) le monde. By this logic if you try to find the opposite of tout le monde a faim, you'll get personne n'a faim.


4

the verbal form "aurait pu" is an instance of conditionnel passé. The (indicative) plus-que-parfait would have been "avait pu" "Nul" used as pronoun is a more formal form of "personne" (in the meaning of "no one"). "Nul", just like "personne", already carries the negation , so there is no ...


3

The "irregular" form is the positive imperative which uses the stressed pronoun toi after the verb. Lève-toi ! All other French tenses use the unstressed reflexive pronoun te: Tu te lèves Tu ne te lèves pas Tu t'es levé Ne te lève pas ! ... It's a pattern among romance languages imperatives: Spanish: ¡Levantate! / ¡No te levanta! Italian: ...


3

Quoi is not part of the negation, it doesn't function with ne, it can't be grammatically nor semantically compared to pas, point, nullement, guère, etc. In the sentence je ne sais quoi dire the negation is ne...pas where pas is omitted. The answers to this question might help you go further with the omission of pas. Quoi introduces a dependent clause, it is ...


3

When in Paris area, I very rarely hear guère in casual conversation but I believe it happens more when I'm in Southern France (in Provence at least) where you can still hear, possibly because the provencal gaire was very common : Je vais plus guère à la poste. Here are some alternatives: user2233707's Je ne vais pas souvent au bureau de poste maintenant (...


3

The ne is optional is spoken French. You might as well drop le or both: Ma situation financière est pire que je ne pensais. Ma situation financière est pire que je pensais. The feminine is not used, at least in modern French. The pronoun le refers to the whole phrase because the sentence does not say penser la situation pire but penser que la situation ...


3

Je veux que du saumon... Courant, à l'écrit ou soutenu : Je ne veux que du saumon... ...j'ai que deux trucs à faire. Courant, (je n'ai que...) ...j'ai besoin de qu'une pomme Incorrect. On dit/écrit: J'ai besoin que d'une pomme / Je n'ai besoin que d'une pomme. Je veux que ça pour le dîner ce soir. Courant (je ne veux que ça...) ...j'ai que celui-ci ...


3

It's a formal and somewhat literary construction. First of all, il est (impersonal) for il y a (there is) is a formal construction. Then you have this literary expression "il n'y a pas jusqu'à/il n'est pas jusqu'à + substantif et proposition relative au subjonctif avec ne", "marquant avec insistance le point de référence limite" (TLFi) i....


2

Pour parler un peu de la grammaire, c'est un exemple de la construction ne...que mais à l'oral comme @Personne a dit dans un commentaire. Comme le ne a tendance à disparaître quand on parle, on peut dire : T'as qu'à le garder vu que tu l'as déchiré. pour exprimer Tu n'as qu'à le garder vu que tu l'as déchiré. Ne...que veut dire "only" or "...


2

Literally, he said: You just (have to=can) keep it given the fact you ripped it. The meaning is more like: Just keep it, you ripped it anyway.


2

No native speaker. Nul n'aurait pu le dire 'aurait pu' is the third singular of the so-called conditionnel du passé. See https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditionnel_pass%C3%A9_(conjugaison_fran%C3%A7aise) The sentence, as it stands, conveys the meaning of the sentences No one could have said it. No one could have said that. No one could have said so. ...


2

You can hear rien peut arrêter ça in spoken French with the expected meaning. In written/formal French, a negation is built with a split negative form composed with the adverb ne and a pronoun like rien, pas, personne and the likes. These pronouns come from nouns with a (possibly lost) positive value (rien=something, pas=step, personne=person) so this isn't ...


2

Je ne lis rien que de monstrueux is a rare and literary expression. Literally: "I read nothing but monstrous (things)", i.e. "Everything I read here is monstrous". Here is an example of rien que de from Molière's Le Bourgeois gentilhomme: Je ne lui vois rien que de très médiocre, et vous trouverez cent personnes qui seront plus dignes de ...


2

All of your sentences are valid and usual French. The third sentence indeed negates the first one : (1) Il n'y a qu'un livre: there is just one book (i.e. there are no more books than that one) (3) Il n'y a pas qu'un livre: there is not just one book (i.e. there are more books than that one) In the second sentence, plus isn't there no negate anything but to ...


1

Quoi is only used as "pseudo second negator" with the verb savoir. I write "pseudo" because there is actually kind of an implicit pas in this construction, unlike the negations with guère, jamais, nullement, etc where there can't be a pas. None of your attemps with a different verb would work. Quoi can be used in negative statements but ...


1

The sentence could be put that way: Elle ne savait pas quoi entreprendre pour lui faire plaisir The "pas" is dropped, the "quoi" is turned into "qu'" because "entreprendre" starting with a vowel (although this is not mandatory here from where I see it). I would not translate it as Deepl though, because the meaning ...


1

As far as I am concerned, as a native speaker, for your example, I’d rater say « Je ne vais pas souvent au bureau de poste maintenant. ».


1

N'aura nul lieu is quite outdated. Modern French rather uses either n'aura aucun lieu or n'aura nulle part. In any case, this is not a double negation example but just a split negative where both ne and nul(le)/aucun are used to negate "aura un lieu/aura quelque part" (i.e. will have "somewhere" vs will have "nowhere"). A real ...


1

There is no much point trying to find a specific meaning or direct match with an English word for these adverbs. Ne and pas are used in negative statements, either alone or combined. You translation of elle ne va plus au lycée depuis... by "she not going more to the high school" is weird. I'd rather expect: "she hasn't gone to the high school ...


1

No, ne does not create a double negative in French, no matter what is paired with it. Rather, the pair ne ... pas is only one negative. You can substitute several other items for the pas, and you'll get a different "flavour" of negation with a different meaning. This answer contains a partial list of negatives, including ne ... rien. Note that ne ...


1

Il n'y a pas de règle quant à la sorte d'article que l'on doive utiliser ; ce qui dicte la sorte d'article c'est ce que vous avez à dire, ce que vous voulez dire, ce que le contexte indique qu'il faut dire. D'ailleurs dans vos constructions vous utilisez des articles (partitif, du, indéfini pluriel, des), mais aussi un adjectif (deux) et des pronoms (ça, ...


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