20

Using all six of them, you can say, for instance: Rien ni personne ne pourrait plus jamais me faire croire en aucune de ses belles paroles. À partir de maintenant, je vais m'efforcer de ne plus jamais rien devoir à personne en aucun cas, ni dans ma vie personnelle ni dans ma vie professionnelle. Practically speaking, it is not common to see five or ...


6

The second clause “n'empêche” is indeed negative. (And the third clause “ne soit” isn't, this one is a ne explétif.) There is no particular set of verbs with which the “ne littéraire” can be used. The word ne alone can convey negation when paired with any verb in very formal French. You can generally expect philosophical texts to be written in very formal ...


5

In French, to say « Je ne dois pas travailler. » is usually understood thanks to the context. But I usually hear/use it to say: « I don't have to work. ». For example: "Aujourd'hui c'est dimanche, je ne dois pas travailler." For the other meaning, it's usually better to say: "Je ne PEUX pas travailler. Example. « Je ne peux pas travailler car mon médecin me ...


5

The verb “avoir” can take a direct complement which is a noun without an article to indicate that some scheduled activity takes place. This can work both with “il y a” (“there is”) and with a subject (who the person who performs this activity). Only a few complements are in common use, though this is a productive construction: you can use any activity if the ...


5

The first form is the expected one: Les garçons ne sont pas faits pour n’avoir que la peau sur les os. Unlike in you first sentence, there are two independent negations here: ne pas and ne que as show: Les garçons ne sont pas faits pour avoir la peau sur les os. Les garçons sont faits pour n’avoir que la peau sur les os. Of course, in spoken ...


4

The reason is that the verb is not "vouloir" but "vouloir de qqn" (TLFi); (TLFi) A. − [Le plus souvent à la forme nég.] Vouloir de 1. Vouloir de qqn. Être disposé à recevoir, à accepter quelqu'un. Ne plus vouloir de qqn. (user LPH's italics) The use of this verb has a particularity; you don't use it much in the affirmative form, mostly only the ...


3

This de is not an article but a preposition here and used in the indirect transitive form vouloir de while vouloir alone is direct transitive. Vouloir de is not necessarily used in negative sentences: Ils me veulent dans l'équipe. can be rephrased, with a slight change in meaning, as: Ils veulent de moi dans l'équipe. and reciprocally: Ils ne ...


3

Number 5 is nearly correct; you need leur here, as it means them (referring to the parents) as an indirect object pronoun. An indirect object pronoun is used when the verb doesn’t take a direct object (in other words, someone that something is done to or for). In this case, the subject is writing to her parents, which would be écrire à. Therefore: Non, ...


2

The only proper way to answer is "non, elle ne leur a pas écrit".


2

Ne est un adverbe de négation. Il est en général accompagné de "pas, point, guère, jamais, etc", mais ce n'est pas une obligation. "Beaucoup de gens n'ont pu en revenir vivants" est parfaitement correct et n'est pas une exception. On aurait parfaitement pu écrire "Beaucoup de gens n'ont pas pu en revenir vivants" mais ici cela "sonne" moins bien et n'...


1

There are three possible forms: "il n'y a pas de banane" (singular, "il n'y a pas de bananes" (plural) or "il n'y a aucune banane" (singular). The meaning is different: Il n'y a pas de banane Implies "there is no banana (in this recipe)" or something similar; no banana as ingredient. Il n'y a pas de bananes There are no bananas (here). Il n'y a aucune ...


1

yes it changes. For example : "J'ai un oncle" (I have an uncle) it becomes "Je n'ai pas d'oncle" (I have no uncle) "J'ai du travail à faire" (I have work to do) "Je n'ai pas de travail à faire" (I have no work to do) " J'ai de la chance" (I have chance/luck) "Je n'ai pas de chance" (I have no chance/luck)


1

It is rather a case of the use of a partitive article vs a definite article Je ne mange pas de viande means you never eat any meat of any kind, because of religious reasons, because of dietary restrictions, because you are a vegan, etc. It is also OK to write je ne peux pas manger de viande (it stresses then it is a rule you follow) Je ne peux pas ...


1

In your example there shouldn't be any change in my opinion. The sentence you provided becomes in negation: Je n'habites pas dans une jolie maison. There is a possibility for a change here but you need to double check: J'ai une jolie maison -> je n'ai pas de jolie maison What changes for sure is 'des'. It changes to 'de' when it precedes a descriptive ...


1

Comme je comprend cette inversion elle sert à mettre la négation sur l'adverbe et le mot « ne » ne serait qu'un explétif ; c'est un cas de négation non lié au verbe, cet aspect de la négation étant traité dans Le Bon Usage bien que ce cas particulier semble manquer. […] leur extase, doucement noyée de mélancolie, semblait demander de pleurer, rien de ...


1

Jamais rien ni personne ne pourra plus m'empêcher de n'en choisir aucun.


1

In this case "I know not how it was" is saying that the author or teller of the story is saying that he can't explain it, but somehow, looking at this house, there was a pervasive sense of insufferable gloom. The "I know not how it was" is just that " he doesn't know how to explain it". :)


1

My 2 cents : J'en veux = I want of it J'en veux plus = I want more of it (s pronounced) Je n'en veux pas = I don't want of it Je n'en veux plus = I don't want anymore of it (s non pronounced)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible