7

Quand tu parles à un professeur de français, à une autorité, quand tu fais un discours : Je n'ai pas vérifié. Quand tu parles à des collègues, des amis, à ta famille : J'ai pas vérifié. Si tu n'es pas sûr(e) : Je n'ai pas vérifié. Personne ne va te reprocher d'avoir utilisé ce ne.


7

The second clause “n'empêche” is indeed negative. (And the third clause “ne soit” isn't, this one is a ne explétif.) There is no particular set of verbs with which the “ne littéraire” can be used. The word ne alone can convey negation when paired with any verb in very formal French. You can generally expect philosophical texts to be written in very formal ...


7

Using n'a pu in spoken French would be extremely formal and surely surprise the person listening. We essentially always say n'a pas pu or better a pas pu in most occasions. On the other hand, dropping pas in written French (at least in France but I don't think there are regional differences) is still very common and unsurprising to me. What used to be rare ...


5

Personne n'a le plus souvent de valeur négative que lorsqu'il est accompagné d'un ne ou employé seul (Qui est venu ? Personne). Par exemple dans la phrase : Personne n'a tué personne. le premier personne est négatif et correspond à no one/nobody alors que le deuxième personne ne l'est le plus souvent pas et correspond à anyone/anybody. Dans personne n'a ...


4

You shouldn't translate it word for word, Personne n'a faim means nobody is hungry. Personne is the negative form (négation) of tout(s) le monde. By this logic if you try to find the opposite of tout le monde a faim, you'll get personne n'a faim.


4

the verbal form "aurait pu" is an instance of conditionnel passé. The (indicative) plus-que-parfait would have been "avait pu" "Nul" used as pronoun is a more formal form of "personne" (in the meaning of "no one"). "Nul", just like "personne", already carries the negation , so there is no ...


4

Gilles's answer is very helpful. But I too have heard of a list of verbs that more often use "ne" without "pas" than other verbs do. I heard this years ago--whether in a French language learning class or elsewhere I don't remember. I remember especially the verbs "savoir" and "pouvoir" being mentioned, and I've noticed ...


3

Non locuteur natif du français. Normalement, lors d'un discours relâché, d'une discussion relâchée ou d'un texto on peut retirer le "ne". Les locuteurs natifs le font d'ailleurs. J'ai pas vérifié. Note qu'il existe quand même des locuteurs natifs qui considèrent cet assouplissement grammatical incorrect. Par conséquent je te propose de ne pas l'...


3

Je veux que du saumon... Courant, à l'écrit ou soutenu : Je ne veux que du saumon... ...j'ai que deux trucs à faire. Courant, (je n'ai que...) ...j'ai besoin de qu'une pomme Incorrect. On dit/écrit: J'ai besoin que d'une pomme / Je n'ai besoin que d'une pomme. Je veux que ça pour le dîner ce soir. Courant (je ne veux que ça...) ...j'ai que celui-ci ...


2

Pour parler un peu de la grammaire, c'est un exemple de la construction ne...que mais à l'oral comme @Personne a dit dans un commentaire. Comme le ne a tendance à disparaître quand on parle, on peut dire : T'as qu'à le garder vu que tu l'as déchiré. pour exprimer Tu n'as qu'à le garder vu que tu l'as déchiré. Ne...que veut dire "only" or "...


2

Literally, he said: You just (have to=can) keep it given the fact you ripped it. The meaning is more like: Just keep it, you ripped it anyway.


2

I "Not […] or […] anything" has the following renderings. ni…ni…quoi que ce soit, ** ne rien […] et ne rien […]**, **rien […] ou […] The first sentence is slightly wrong; here are correct forms. Je ne vais ni manger ni boire quoi que ce soit. Je ne vais rien manger et ne rien boire. Je ne vais rien manger ou boire. The second second form, is ...


2

The first one would just be: Je ne vais ni manger ni boire. Rien is redundant but if you want to emphasize the fact you'll eat/dring nothing: Je ne vais ni manger ni boire quoi que ce soit. Using both rien and ni would make an heavy double negation, i.e. a positive statement: Je ne vais ni rien manger, ni rien boire. -> Despite what was expected, I ...


2

Both of your suggestions are acceptable and used although their meaning might be slightly different depending on the context. Je ne peux pas non plus travailler ici. "I can't work here like I can't do something else I just talk about" (e.g.: Il y a trop de bruit, je n'arrive pas à dormir. Je ne peux pas non plus travailler ici) or "Like you/...


2

In grammar, this ne is called an expletive, i.e. a word "used without being needed for the meaning or syntax of a sentence." Here are some explanations: The ne explétif does not add any meaning – negative or otherwise – to the sentence; it’s just there to draw attention to what precedes it. It’s formal and optional, and used after certain verbs ...


2

No native speaker. Nul n'aurait pu le dire 'aurait pu' is the third singular of the so-called conditionnel du passé. See https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditionnel_pass%C3%A9_(conjugaison_fran%C3%A7aise) The sentence, as it stands, conveys the meaning of the sentences No one could have said it. No one could have said that. No one could have said so. ...


1

Il n'y a pas de règle quant à la sorte d'article que l'on doive utiliser ; ce qui dicte la sorte d'article c'est ce que vous avez à dire, ce que vous voulez dire, ce que le contexte indique qu'il faut dire. D'ailleurs dans vos constructions vous utilisez des articles (partitif, du, indéfini pluriel, des), mais aussi un adjectif (deux) et des pronoms (ça, ...


1

This translation may not be perfect, but is its general sense correct? (I.e. the speaker believes that none of the listeners understands.) Je doute is a little bit ambiguous. If you say "Je doute qu'aucun d'eux ne comprenne ton discours" it may be understood as the speaker does not believe in the fact that none of the listeners understands, i.e. ...


1

To add to grouah's answer, this ne is probably a reflection of the same particle found in Latin, as Grevisse points out (Bon usage, 14th ed. §1023 H1). That particle was to be found before the object clause of verbs expressing worry or fear, which is also the most common occurrence in French (In Latin, said object clause could even be negative in its own ...


1

It is rather a case of the use of a partitive article vs a definite article Je ne mange pas de viande means you never eat any meat of any kind, because of religious reasons, because of dietary restrictions, because you are a vegan, etc. It is also OK to write je ne peux pas manger de viande (it stresses then it is a rule you follow) Je ne peux pas ...


1

In your example there shouldn't be any change in my opinion. The sentence you provided becomes in negation: Je n'habites pas dans une jolie maison. There is a possibility for a change here but you need to double check: J'ai une jolie maison -> je n'ai pas de jolie maison What changes for sure is 'des'. It changes to 'de' when it precedes a descriptive ...


1

In this case "I know not how it was" is saying that the author or teller of the story is saying that he can't explain it, but somehow, looking at this house, there was a pervasive sense of insufferable gloom. The "I know not how it was" is just that " he doesn't know how to explain it". :)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible