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14 votes
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Where should a pronoun go when the verb is followed by an infinitive clause?

From what you have written I expect you know the rule that says that when the direct object is a pronoun, it must be placed before the verb. J'améliore la peinture → Je l'améliore. I suppose you ...
None's user avatar
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13 votes
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can "que que" ever appear?

No, que que cannot appear in regular text except if the second que is a substantive or to mark hesitation/sluttering: On ne doit pas utiliser que « que » pour traduire what. Tu dis que... que j'ai ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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11 votes
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How do I properly word this question in French?

To correct your proposals: Quelle est ta chanson préférée de lui ? De ses chansons, quelle est ta préférée ? (chanson is a feminine noun). Or other suggestions: Laquelle de ses chansons préfères-tu ...
Sacha's user avatar
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9 votes
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Si plusieurs adjectifs modifient un nom, doivent-ils être rangés dans un certain ordre ?

Comme l'indique la longueur de l'article Wikipedia correspondant c'est un sujet très complexe. Pour le dire en quelques mots, plusieurs tentatives ont été faites pour identifier les règles de ...
Evpok's user avatar
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9 votes
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"Pourquoi l'hôtel est-il complet?" Why est-il and not just est?

Even though this is more or less a duplicate, I'll add an explanation that I didn't see when skimming previous answers. The subject pronouns are clitics, which have some fascinating properties but ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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9 votes
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"Pas franchement" vs "franchement pas"

Tu n'as pas franchement l’air d’être si occupée que ça... Is "pas vraiment", as you said => "pas tout à fait" Here "pas" moderates "franchement". {vs}: Tu n'as franchement pas l’air d’être si ...
lemon's user avatar
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8 votes
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Is there a general guide on how adjectives change meaning with position?

I don't think there's a foolproof rule, but in all the cases I can think about, there's a figurative, non-literal and idiomatic meaning to the order "adjective + noun" whereas "noun + ...
qoba's user avatar
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8 votes
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Placement of "tout" as an object in a sentence

Tout clarifies the meaning of a verb, an adverb or a noun. In the case tout is clarifying a verb or an adverb, it is an adverb and is invariant. In the case tout is clarifying a noun, it is an ...
Charly's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why is "différents" before the noun in the following sentence and also no articles used?

L'adjectif différent antéposé signifie plusieurs La phrase pourrait s'écrire : (Ils ont participé à) plusieurs événements historiques. §B 2. Usuel, au plur. et antéposé avec valeur d'adj. ...
Toto's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the difference between "là toujours" and "toujours là"?

Là and toujours are both adverbs. In what you want to express là modifies the verb être and toujours the adverb là. Theoretically adverbs can be placed before or after the verb. It's most usual to ...
None's user avatar
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6 votes
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Placement of "tout"?

Afficher tout is short for Afficher tout (le contenu) and isn't technically wrong. Though I'll agree with you, as a native speaker, Tout afficher sounds better to me.
Azami's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the correct word order when lining up the same verb in three different tenses?

I find the order (past, present, future) more natural, but I think any order is ok. Choosing a different order puts a slightly different emphasis: if chronological order is not used, then the first ...
Gilles 'SO nous est hostile''s user avatar
6 votes

Parsing "plus de retour en arrière possible"

Unlike English where traditional grammar states a verb is mandatory to form a complete sentence, a verbless sentence is possible in French where it is called phrase nominale. The sentence means: ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
6 votes

How do you emphasize a part of a sentence?

The word order would not vary much, but the word choice would likely vary, as well as the tone. General guidelines concerning the tone change would be the pitch getting higher, the volume getting ...
Pas un clue's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why is it "une vie meilleure", not "une meilleure vie"?

While BANGS is a good rule of thumb, it's not a strong, 100% true rule. Many adjectives that are usually before the noun can be placed after it in some cases, mostly for historic or stylistic reasons ...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
6 votes

Why do pronouns sometimes precede infinitives when infinitives are used as imperative?

C'est une traduction erronée. Ce devrait être : Veuillez vous assoir ici. Voire, éventuellement : Asseyez-vous ici.
Toto's user avatar
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5 votes

Word order in questions

For a general discussion, you might want to look at the answers of the possible duplicate questions mentioned in the question comments. As for your particular word orders: Depuis quand ce magasin est-...
GAM PUB's user avatar
  • 2,888
5 votes

Is there a rule for adjective order with multiple adjectives?

I recognize that the existing answer, apart of the fact that it is written in French, might also be a little too abstract for immediate needs. First of all, a general thumb rule is that epithet ...
fralau's user avatar
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5 votes
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Is it appropriate to use "ennemi" as the subject here?

Leur ennemi ne sera pas que la chaleur accablante de cette région. Turned this way, it seems like they will face only one multifaceted enemy, that will present itself as insubstantial oppressing heat,...
Pas un clue's user avatar
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5 votes
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Do adverbs go at the end of questions?

That would be: Vois-tu parfois Nicole? but the literary vois-tu is seldom used in spoken French. More usual usual ways would be: Est-ce que tu vois parfois Nicole ? or Est-ce que ça t'arrive (...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
5 votes
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Différence entre « certain âge » et « âge certain »

L'adjectif certain change de sens suivant qu'il est placé avant ou après un nom. Le TLFi dispose d'ailleurs de deux entrées différentes. Dans le premier cas, il signifie qui a un caractère ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
5 votes

Why do French dialog tags in books sometimes use inversion, but are not asking a question?

Pour avoir remplacé le tag grammaire par celui de syntaxe, je le payerai de quelques détails tant la chose n'est pas si anecdotique que cela. D'abord pour faire observer que cette inversion du sujet ...
MC68020's user avatar
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5 votes

Modification de « rien » au passé composé

La forme idiomatique est : Je n'ai rien vu d'important. Google Books en trouve une dizaine depuis 1900, et un peu plus dans les pages web. En revanche, il ne trouve que deux occurrences pour ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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How do you say "I can drive us to the cottage" in French?

In declarative clauses with no inversion, object pronouns, in French, precede the verbs to which they are attached. This may be observed in phrases such as "s'il vous plaît" (if it pleases you). In ...
Maroon's user avatar
  • 2,127
5 votes

Prepositions before infinitives? ... "to come back from injury"

It's fine to use only the infinitive in this context: Revenir de blessure et courir un marathon, et en plus battre son record personnel, c'est juste incroyable ! This is an example of infinitive ...
Reyedy's user avatar
  • 3,131
5 votes

Prepositions before infinitives? ... "to come back from injury"

You don't need a preposition: Revenir de blessure pour directement courir un marathon, et battre son record personnel par dessus le marché, c'est tout simplement incroyable !
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
5 votes

What is the grammar analysis of this (professeur elle aussi)?

Word by word translation can be helpful but rarely gives a proper sentence. Here is a rare case where English uses an article while French doesn't. Another point, aussi, being after the noun better ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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« Tu aurais dû me le laisser faire » ou « Tu aurais dû me laisser le faire » ?

Both are valid but usage strongly differ. The second form: Tu aurais du me laisser le faire. is by far the most common one. It can be used whatever the language register. The first form: Tu aurais ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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