9

Le + day of the week To express usual or repeated activity on a day of the week, use le + the day of the week. Le dimanche means every Sunday, or normally on Sundays, plural. It is often translated as "On Sundays, [we go fishing]" but sur is never used for "on" in this case. Day of the week Using just the day of the week implies one time ...


8

Outside rare regionalisms, native speakers never find idiomatic phrases unusual or strange. This is by definition. "Strange" and "stranger" are related for a reason. On1 dormira dans un hôtel : There is an hotel where we will sleep. We probably already know which one. On dormira à l'hôtel : The place where we are going to sleep is a &...


6

Update I mean the etymological/ancient/root/deep meaning or a meaning from an era like 15th century Well, we should definitely distinguish "etymological" from "deep"; nothing about the past makes a meaning any more valid than a meaning from the present. (Hence, I'm keeping the bottom half of this answer for anyone wondering whether this ...


5

Yes, this seems rather counter (contre?) intuitive, doesn't it? :) The semantic link you're missing is that of reciprocity. An action earns a reaction. A delivery earns a confirmation. In the WordReference entry, the closest definition to the one used here is the fourth: "for, in exchange for": Je donnerais dix ans de ma vie contre une bonne ...


5

With expressions of clock time, use the preposition à to say (at) what time. You can leave out the "at" in English, but not the à in French. It answers the question « À quelle heure ... ? » À quelle heure ? À midi. Demain on a rendez-vous à 13h30. On va dîner à 19h00. Je me lève toujours à cinq heures. For expressions of repeated days or ...


5

No doubts: De janvier à février


5

Poser cette question à Jean ((c')est) un drôle de choix. Avec un attribut (ici un drôle de choix), on peut avoir le sujet (poser cette question à Jean) à la fin et quand le sujet est un infinitif (poser...), il est introduit par de, que de (littéraire), ou que (imitation des classiques) (Le bon usage, Grevisse et Goosse, 14e, éd. Duculot, §911b, incluant ...


5

Pas une faute, par contre je (France métropolitaine) n'emploierais 'toucher au chômage' que pour signifier 'changer ses modalités' (sujet=gouvernement par exemple), donc un sens bien différent. Comme commenté par @jlliagre, 'au' pourrait aussi être utilisé dans "Je me demande combien je vais toucher au chômage" qui est équivalent à "Je me ...


5

Je dirais que "en intérieur" répond à la question "comment ?" plutôt qu'à la question "où ?". - Où vas tu ? - À l'intérieur. - Comment sont cultivés ces légumes ? - En intérieur


5

First, the "locution prépositive" auprès de can be used for introducing a complement designating a person having official duties, or some institution or entity, and showcases, aside from location, this idea of an assignment and being accredited to be there (translated quickly from the TLFi, auprès (de) I A 3. examples 32-25). Outside of this, ...


5

Cet hôtel est dans une rue très bruyante  is correct and it is the usual way to express it. We would not normally have sur in this sentence. If we give the name of the street we can have either: La boulangerie est rue Lafayette. or La boulangerie est dans la rue Lafayette. I don't use this last one but I've heard people say it. I don't like the possibility ...


5

Voie 2 is a complément circonstanciel de lieu. It answers to the question: Où va arriver le train ? Le train va arriver voie 2. Voie 2 can be removed or moved without breaking the sentence: Le train va arriver. Voie 2, le train va arriver. That sentence uses no preposition because voie 2 is similar to an address, here a track, just like would be a street ...


4

L'usage est nuancé comme les constructions porter à et prêter à (réf.) sont différentes de celles de porter sur. La différence, c'est la signification. Les locutions avec la préposition à s'emploient pour signifier « conduire » ou « pousser » quelqu'un vers quelque chose un peu comme signifie la construction faire faire. La construction porter à, qui peut ...


4

On trouve cette syntaxe particulière à « avec » (et « sans ») avec certains verbes courants et d'autres mots courants. Elle semble être beaucoup une tournure du dialogue, motivée en partie par la répétition, qui conduit à l'éllipse. Des exemples typiques (Le manque de l'indication que « sans » peut être utilisé de la même façon n'est pas une affirmation que ...


4

"faire avec", "vivre avec"... sont des expressions toutes faites. Pour le cas "Il avait pris un bâton et faisait des moulinets avec.", on ne peut pas dire "Le bâton qu'il faisait des moulinets avec" mais "Le bâton avec lequel il faisait des moulinets". C'est à dire la même tournure que "Un collaborateur ...


4

The idea is that of an exchange; "contre", in this usage has the following meaning. (TLFi) III.− Marque l'échange, le rapport de deux grandeurs. Échanger un sac de billes contre un couteau; parier à dix contre un In English this meaning could be rendered by "in return for". The word does not make explicit that the signature is ...


4

Vous avez répondu à votre question. Un gobelet à popcorn est la description du récipient destiné à contenir du popcorn, il est peut-être encore vide, vous l'avez peut-être rempli avec autre chose bien qu'il soit destiné techniquement au popcorn. La même logique s'applique à la bouteille. Un gobelet (ou seau) de popcorn désigne le récipient contenant du ...


4

Il ne s'agit pas que d'être plus courant ou pas. Le sens est sensiblement différent entre les deux expressions. Avec jouer à, il s'agit simplement d'un jeu, d'une distraction : jouer au gendarme et aux voleur alors qu'avec jouer les il ne s'agit plus nécessairement d'un amusement mais plutôt de feindre être ce qu'on n'est pas, parfois à des fins de tromperie....


4

C'est une attestation de moi. C'est moi qui ai écrit l'attestation. C'est une attestation à moi. L'attestation m'appartient. (Tournure populaire) Ces phrases seraient plus idiomatiques en modifiant la première partie : Cette attestation est de moi. Cette attestation est à moi.


4

En is a pronoun here. It refers to solution and in this way, one avoids in French weird turns like Vous avez cherché une solution et vous avez trouvé une solution. The correct turn is Vous avez cherché une solution et vous en avez trouvé une. → You looked for a solution and you found one. Note that en is always present, in correct French, for expressions ...


3

La forme la plus courante est « difficulté à + infinitif ». On dit aussi « *difficulté pour + infinitif » ou « difficulté de + infinitif ». (Avec un nom, c'est toujours « difficulté de + nom ».) En première approximation, les trois sont synonymes. « Difficulté de » était plus courant autrefois, mais « difficulté à » est plus courant depuis longtemps. Par ...


3

In Latin, all cities and country names were feminine and not neutral as we might have expected. The preposition used was in, e.g.: In Gallia non solum in omnibus civitatibus atque in omnibus pagis partibusque, Caesar, The Gallic War. In French, this in became en and is still used, without any article prepended to the country name: In Gallia → En Gaule ...


3

You got it right, it's a dated way to say ...distingue des rosiers. The TLFi also gives this definition : − D'avec, loc. prép. [Construit avec certains verbes (tels que divorcer, retirer, etc.) pour marquer de façon plus positive la différence ou la séparation existant entre deux pers., entre deux choses, entre une pers. et une ou plusieurs choses] : 4. ...


3

Sous est une préposition très courante pour exprimer une substance (souvent médicamenteuse) prise par une personne et qui agit sur son corps. Elle peut se comprendre comme "soumis à l'effet de". Ex: Je suis sous antihistaminiques Nouvelles sous ecstasy (titre d'un livre de Beigbeder) Ce patient est sous oxygène Cette préposition est donc ...


3

This question of whether to use the partitive article "de" has nothing to do with the use of an adverb. You are dealing with forms that are idiomatic; whereas in English, for instance , you say "I am cold" in French you say "J'ai froid" and there is no way to make sense of "je suis froid" along the line of feeling the ...


3

It's a formal and somewhat literary construction. First of all, il est (impersonal) for il y a (there is) is a formal construction. Then you have this literary expression "il n'y a pas jusqu'à/il n'est pas jusqu'à + substantif et proposition relative au subjonctif avec ne", "marquant avec insistance le point de référence limite" (TLFi) i....


3

You don't have to worry about dialect as you should before long be able to make out those sounds, if you practice; once you master them as they are pronounced in the most accepted manner you will be able to recognize distortions without problem. Here are two videos providing exercise for the nasals.                               an-on                         ...


3

There is nothing special with semaine: Fin de semaine has a generic meaning. Every week has a fin de semaine1, same for fin de journée, fin de mois, fin de saison, fin d'année, and fin de siècle. These expressions name a recurring period of time. On the other hand la fin de la semaine is referring to the same period of a single week, often the current one or ...


3

"Hors means outside or except." The first use case for this preposition is "l’exclusion du lieu." i.e. "exclusion from a place" but it can also mean excepté (see Wiktionnaire): Ils y sont tous allés, hors deux ou trois. Hors cela, je suis de votre sentiment. Here I would use the "locution prépositive" à part instead, ...


3

Les deux se disent et la forme sans « à » l'emportait jusqu'à présent (pendant le 19ème siècle et le 20ème), mais tout d'un coup il semblerait y avoir eu un revirement, ou une tendance vers la normalisation (après une lente baisse pour la première, et une lente augmentation pour la seconde) et c'est la forme avec « à » qui l'a emporté pendant un certain ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible