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1

In this sentence "ce" is not an adjective but a pronoun; just as "celui" it is a demonstrative pronoun; more precisely it is a neuter demonstrative pronoun (TLFi¹). However, in the grammatical context of your sentence it is analysed by some grammarians as part of "ce que", which as a whole is reckoned with as a relative pronoun. ...


2

Bon (me, te, lui, etc...) semble must be seen as set phrase where sembler is used as an impersonal verb. This phrase can be modified by an adverb (comme, où, si...). I would say the whole can be considered as an adverbial phrase, no subject to be found here. As an adverbial phrase it modifies the verb déplacer in your sentence. A few examples: J'irai où ...


2

"Où bon < pronom coi > semble" is an idiom. It is also found in a form where the pronoun is replaced by a noun preceded by "à", but it is rather rarely used nowadays. (ref. 1958) […] libéralisme restreint par l'obligation de prendre ses blés où bon semble à l'O.N.I.C. (TLFi) Si/comme/qui/que... bon (me, te...) semble. Si/comme... ...


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