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19

The antecedent of le here is not la chose, but the clause « que vous faites cette chose ». This is given le, masculine singular, only because that functions as the default inflection when gender and number don't apply. It's definitely tempting to find the nearest noun for a given pronoun. But certain pronouns, especially le and en, tend to associate ...


18

Technically, the sentence is missing a comma: Tu l'as acheté où, ce pantalon ? To parse it, better to first ignore the trailing part that is optional. That reads: Tu l'as acheté où ? or the variants où tu l'as acheté ? and où l'as-tu acheté ? (formal) This clearly translates to Where did you buy it? But the person speaking wants to make sure you know ...


12

The subject pronoun ce and the demonstrative determiner ce/cette/ces aren't the same word, even if they share a form, and don't follow the same rules. The subject pronoun is ultimately descended from a Latin neuter singular demonstrative pronoun (hoc), but by Old French it had become uninflecting (ço < ecce hoc). In Old and Middle French, ce/ço wasn't a ...


8

Body parts and possessives From A Comprehensive French Grammar, 228-229, use the indirect object pronoun to refer to the person affected when the action applies to someone else's body. The indirect object pronouns (complément objet indirect) are me, te, lui, nous, vous, leur. Examples: Il m'a tordu le bras. He twisted my arm. Elle lui lave les cheveux. ...


8

The determiners ces and ses are homophonous (des homophones) and are therefore pronounced the same; more precisely, we're talking about grammatical homophones (see more of those). The sentence « X a l'habitude de passer Noël avec ces grand-parents » without any prior reference to which grand parents we're talking about, is unlikely. Generally people are not ...


8

Native French speaker here. In my experience, I have never intentionally made a difference between the pronunciation of "ces" and "ses" myself, I've never heard there was a difference, and I've never been able to tell a difference when other people spoke. So, purely phonetically speaking, those two words are (again, in my experience) ...


6

A common usage of "en" is to refer to something that was mentionned just before, so in general, it makes sense to translate "en" by "it" in english. For example "Du temps?. J'en ai passé à écrire toutes ces lignes." would translate to "Time? I spent a lot of it writing all these lines". Considering "J'en ...


6

Like all languages, it will depend on who is saying it, the context, and the situation that arises from such, but for question the answer is probably the first one, the second one isn't linguistically wrong but it doesn't make much sense, if he is spending Christmas with some grand parents, one should give more information about their identity, like a l'...


5

The more idiomatic way to say it is : David ? C'est le plus intelligent de la classe. The alternative "il est le plus..." is nevertheless sometimes used and definitely understood but sounds slightly odd or too literary and is more often heard from non-native speakers. Note that only il is possible in a comparative context like this one: Il est plus ...


5

French Crever est bien un verbe. L'affirmation que en crever n'est pas un verbe est incorrecte. (Cette partie traite d'une version précédente de la question.) En effet, on peut dire 'Crever de faim, de soif,...'. Exemple : On peut crever de faim, de soif, des drogues dans ces cités. De quoi on peut crever dans ces cités ? De faim, etc. En est un pronom ...


5

The plural agreement is expected in that case: Elles sont toutes joyeuses. so there is no way to sort out: Toutes sont joyeuses and Elles sont bien joyeuses. Reference: https://bescherelle.ca/adverbe-tout/


5

The phenomenon you've stumbled upon, sometimes called the Person Case Constraint in the linguistic literature, reflects a general tendency of languages with weak pronouns or polypersonal verbal agreement: some combinations of pronouns are prohibited depending on person and case (the grammatical role they have in the sentence, i.e. subject, direct or indirect ...


5

Both are valid but usage strongly differ. The second form: Tu aurais du me laisser le faire. is by far the most common one. It can be used whatever the language register. The first form: Tu aurais du me le laisser faire. was common in the past but is now outdated and might only used in a literary context. Reference (Guide de gram­mai­re française pour ...


5

You can use either of them. In the first sentence, the pronoun il refers to the movie: Il se passe dans un hôtel = Le film se passe dans un hôtel. In the second sentence which is less formal, the neutral pronoun ça refers to what happens in the movie. Ça se passe dans un hôtel = L'action se déroule dans un hôtel.


5

C'est une exception spécifique aux verbes forcer, obliger et contraindre (Le Bon usage, 14e ed., §908 a) 8°). Ces verbes ont la particularité qu'en conjugaison active, l'object indirect se construit avec à, mais sous forme de participe adjectif ou composé avec être (par example au passif), ils se construisent plutôt avec de. Si à apparaît dans le cas où l'...


5

Since "qui" is the subject in "Qui parle sans cesse?", it is singular. It would be different if you said "Qui sont ces hommes qui parlent sans cesse?", in which case the subject would be "les hommes", which is plural.


5

The interrogative word qui always triggers masculine singular agreement. You can see it as lacking number and gender features, and thus agreement defaults to the least marked number and gender: "Je vois que tu as eu peu de visiteurs, qui est venu ?" (even though you know there's been several visitors, the verb is still singular) The relative ...


4

En fait, il y a ici confusion entre deux constructions du verbe penser. Penser à qqc (Sens IV.A.1-4.): ici "avoir présent à l'esprit" Penser qqc de qqc (Sens II.A.2.b.α) "Avoir pour jugement à propos de qqc". La question qui t'interpelle est construite avec ce second tour et interroge à propos du "qqc" complément direct. À moins ...


4

La phrase sur laquelle tu bases ton raisonnement est utilisée dans un contexte incorrect. En réalité, la question associée à Je pense à quelque chose. est : À quoi penses-tu ? La question que tu as voulu y associer s'utilise dans le contexte suivant : – Pour les vacances, je propose de partir en Espagne. Qu'en penses-tu/T'en penses quoi ? [Pourrait ...


4

The meaning is very close between celui-ci and celui-là. In theory, the first one is for things closer than the second one but this nuance is not always respected. The third one has a different meaning. They are close to the English: this one (celui-ci) , that one (celui-là) and this (ceci). You are missing cela / ça for the English that. Note that celui is ...


4

The sentence is ambiguous but the second meaning ("we all want to save them") is not likely to be right so I would rule out a mistranslation. If that were intended, we could say: Nous tous, on veut les sauver. To convey "we want to save them all" in everyday speech, I believe « nous voulons les sauver tous » / « on veut les sauver tous »...


4

Il n'y a pas de problème à l'écrire. Le sens est : ... pour que les enfants s'amusent à construire des châteaux de boites de carton. comme, à partir de : Robert a eu l’idée de faire un grand tas de sable pour que les enfants s’amusent à le creuser ou à en construire des châteaux. on peut écrire : ...ou à construire des châteaux de sable. ou alors, si ...


4

The idiomatic phrase is ce n'est pas l'envie qui m'en manque (where m' is indirect object in the dative case), and it means not that I don't want to or I'd love to, but... (Larousse). I think en is very legitimate here, in that it explains "what kind of desire you are not lacking", and that is normally expressed in the surrounding context of the ...


3

Ce n'est pas une exception. Il y a plusieurs manières d'utiliser le verbe penser. Si on le construit sous la forme « penser à quelque chose », le pronom correspondant est « y penser ». Si on le construit sous la forme « penser quelque chose de quelque chose », les pronoms correspondants sont « en penser quoi ». « Penser à quelque chose » signifie avoir un ...


3

To complete the previous answers. As said, the "correct" sentence would need an additional comma to look like : "Tu l'as acheté où, ce pantalon ?" As stated by others, the 2nd part of the sentence is to remind what we are talking about, and that second part is optional. So without the optional part the sentence would be : "Tu l'as ...


3

You are 100% right... and Google Translate is wrong...


3

In this case "Ce" is correct, it means "cela / ceci" and it's always singular. You're right, it's a kind of catch all construction. "Ce n'est pas mon livre" and "Ce ne sont pas mes livres" are both correct.


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