New answers tagged

4

The interrogative word qui always triggers masculine singular agreement. You can see it as lacking number and gender features, and thus agreement defaults to the least marked number and gender: "Je vois que tu as eu peu de visiteurs, qui est venu ?" (even though you know there's been several visitors, the verb is still singular) The relative ...


-1

If the verb is "être", then it will be in the plural: "Qui sont les parents?" or (to steal vc 74's example) "Qui sont ces hommes qui parlent sans cesse?" Otherwise, it will generally be in the singular. English is exactly the same in this regard: "Who is making all that noise?" vs "Who are the people making all ...


5

Since "qui" is the subject in "Qui parle sans cesse?", it is singular. It would be different if you said "Qui sont ces hommes qui parlent sans cesse?", in which case the subject would be "les hommes", which is plural.


2

J'ai acheté les chemises → je les ai achetées. J'ai acheté les livres → je les ai achetés. J'ai acheté quelque chose à quelqu'un → I bought something from somebody/ I bought something for somebody. Je (les) leur ai acheté → I bought (them) from them/I bought (them) for them. EDIT (merci @Xoudo) One must mention "Je les leur ai acheté" is quasi ...


5

C'est une exception spécifique aux verbes forcer, obliger et contraindre (Le Bon usage, 14e ed., §908 a) 8°). Ces verbes ont la particularité qu'en conjugaison active, l'object indirect se construit avec à, mais sous forme de participe adjectif ou composé avec être (par example au passif), ils se construisent plutôt avec de. Si à apparaît dans le cas où l'...


Top 50 recent answers are included