15

Note: It is difficult to avoid using IPA to describe pronunciation. English vowels are absolutely not equivalent to French ones, so comparisons in dictionaries (e.g. "like the a in angel") are often misleading. Your given pronunciations are not correct: There is absolutely a difference between the pronunciation of un and that of a, à, and as. Un is ...


14

The widespread pronunciation is [pano] with no nasalisation. You might hear [panɔ] in eastern France, but this is unrelated to your question. A non native speaker might hear a slight kind of nasalization at the end of the vowel a due to the transition to a nasal consonant. This is probably what you experienced but native French ears cannot hear it, or at ...


13

Depending on the dialect of the speaker, schwa might be realised as [əʷ], [œ] or [ø]. Whatever this realisation might be, it's still its own phoneme, since it has a very different behaviour from /ø/: /ø/ can appear in both open and closed syllables for most speakers, while speakers who realise /ə/ as [ø] in open syllables (as your speaker did for monsieur) ...


12

A contrast between close-mid /o/ and open-mid /ɔ/ is present in many varieties of French. But the distribution of the two sounds varies between accents. Some accents have distinctions in vowel length as well as in vowel quality, but I think that most French learners are not taught an accent with vowel length distinctions. In some positions, the contrast is "...


12

The distinction between those sets of consonants isn't really in the configuration of the speech organs, but in the timing of the vocal folds' (lack of) vibration. Consonants such as /p, b, t, d, k and g/ are called stop consonants, because they're produced by completely stopping the airflow for a fraction of second, increasing the pressure in your vocal ...


10

According to "l'Académie Française", it's because of the earlier use of it "ce en" (ce qui est en) dessus dessous, meaning "what is upside down". "Ce en" is then pronounced like "cent / sang / sans".


9

It depends on your reference point... What exactly does /məsjø/ mean to you? If you mean that you were trying to use a sound like the one in the last syllable of the English word "comma", or in the first syllable of the English word "manipulate", then don't do that. The English sounds transcribed as /ə/ are not very close to the French sounds transcribed as ...


8

Family names pronunciation is defined by usage. Members of a given family can decide to pronounce their name the way they like among the possible variants. Moreover, the way family names are written was often unstable in the past, as orthography in general wasn't fixed when family names appeared. When a newborn was declared, their parents were very often ...


7

There is usually a very slight pause between fin and à un conflit but all these vowels might be also pronounced in a row. In poetry, hiatus tend to be avoided but in regular prose/speech, French has no problem with successive vowels, whether nasalized or not. For example, the sentence: Tu as en haut un houx aérien. has eight successive phonetic vowels /...


7

They indeed likely have more difficulty than Spanish, Italian and German kids who use much more regular spelling and phonetic rules. However, English speaking kids are reported to have more difficulties, given English spelling extreme irregularity. Excerpt from "Troubles dans l’apprentissage de la lecture, Anne-Marie Chartier s’entretient avec Franck ...


7

A word ending with a consonant followed by a word starting with a vowel is necessary but not sufficient for a liaison. This rules out any liaison in: Je suis très sociable. Neither the final s of suis, nor the final s of très is pronounced. That doesn't mean final consonants are never pronounced in French. There are many words where they are, but this ...


6

It's part of a more general phenomenon. Standard French makes a phonemic distinction between /e/ and /ɛ/, but in practice there are considerable phonetic variations between [e] and [ɛ], some regional, some depending on the speaker, and some free variations (where the same speaker might randomly pronounce the same phrase in one way or the other). A majority ...


6

I don't think it's an exception so much as a way of pronouncing as /eXe/ the end of certain words that can also be pronounced as /ɛXe/, where X stands for some consonant sound. The same pronunciation is observed, for example, for all the verbs in -êter that I've found in wiktionary, such as Prêter / Apprêter Enquêter Arrêter S'entêter Étêter Embêter In ...


6

I'm no expert in old French so I can't tell you if we should, but we'd definitely pronounce it as it is written, but following the pronunciation rules of modern French. So "déchiroit" would be pronounced as "déchiroit" and "entrez" as "entré". That's what a native would say naturally, but I have no idea if that's how they should. I say "would" because it's ...


6

The following paper posits a different set of rules which (when tested on their corpus) proved to be much more accurate than the "careful" principle: Our proposal, then, is the following. In conjunction with a pedagogical norm which requires students at elementary levels of the study of French to produce only obligatory liaisons, we suggest that students ...


6

I'm afraid you have to revert your correction. The very large majority of the words ending in -en are pronounced /ɛ̃/ and the rest are pronounced /ɛn/ (e.g. amen, cérumen, golden, hymen, lichen, pollen). An obvious and possibly unique exception is the preposition or pronoun en always pronounced /ɑ̃/.


5

Effectivement, j'ai aussi tendance à ne pas appliquer la prononciation normale du pluriel de « des bœufs bourguignons » lorsque'il s'agit de la locution : je mange [de.bœf.bur.gi.ɲɔ̃] le dimanche alors que je vois [de.bø.bur.gi.ɲɔ̃] dans un pré. De même pour « des œufs Kinder » [de.zœf.kin.dɛʁ] ne sont pas « des œufs durs » [de.zø.dyʁ], « des os à moelle » [...


5

One cannot say that the AU digraph (or the EAU trigraph ) is always pronounced /o/ in French. /o/ is only the most common pronunciation. AU/EAU is indeed almost always pronounced /o/ when standing alone (au, eau) or at the end of a word (bureau, beau). But there can be regional differences. One of the source I give states that /ɔ/ can be heard at the end of ...


5

Dictionaries They vary: The TLFi presents the [œ] pronunciation first, but also gives a list of the choices made by various dictionaries in the past, including: Spelling as déjeûner (to make it consistent with the [ø] pronunciation) in some dictionaries from the XVIIIth & XIXth Centuries, including the Dictionnaire de l’Académie française of 1740 ...


5

Historically, /ɛ̃/ was pronounced as [ɛ̃]. There is also a connection between /ɛ̃/ and /ɛ/ in spelling and in alternations of the pronunciation of certain words ending in -ien/-ienne or -ain/aine: chien/chienne, mien/mienne, sain/saine, vain/vaine.


5

In fact the pronunciation is phonemically /bɛʁg.sɔn/. The final is not nasalized because it's considered a foreign name. Foreign names are generally read more or less letter by letter, although there is considerable variation depending on the name and on the speaker. Until the 18th century (I think), foreign names used to be transcribed into French, then ...


5

Je ne suis pas l'auteur de la réponse, mais ce serait lié à une ancienne prononciation de Anne, qui serait Ânne. Il s'agit d'une vieille prononciation française que le Québec a conservée, comme beaucoup d'autres traits du français des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. Ce «a postérieur», comme l'appellent les linguistes parce qu'il est prononcé plus à l'...


5

Il me semble qu'il y a trois prononciations possibles: une sorte de coup de glotte nasalisé, avec ou sans ouvrir la bouche, que je ne vois pas comment écrire en alphabet phonétique. C'est le son le plus courant, et c'est celui qui me vient à l'esprit dans votre exemple « hum hum, ça va ». un raclement de gorge qui se termine en fermant les lèvres, qui est ...


5

Whether you pronounce /e/ or /ɛ/ in agression, terrorisme and many other words doesn't make that much a difference. There are regional or just personal variations so native speakers might use one or the other. For example, here is a map showing if raisonner is more pronounced /re.../ (dark blue) or /rɛ.../ (light blue) depending on the département of origin:...


5

The four typical nasal vowels are /œ̃, ɔ̃, ɛ̃, ã/ as in un bon vin blanc. In what is called Parisian French, /œ̃/ has been absorbed into /ɛ̃/, leaving only three distinct nasals. Hence, brun sounds like brin and so on. And yup, it affects un, which is otherwise /œ̃/, not /ã/. You don't need to emulate this pronunciation. You can if you want, but it ...


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