We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
14

The widespread pronunciation is [pano] with no nasalisation. You might hear [panɔ] in eastern France, but this is unrelated to your question. A non native speaker might hear a slight kind of nasalization at the end of the vowel a due to the transition to a nasal consonant. This is probably what you experienced but native French ears cannot hear it, or at ...


14

It seems that the reason for this unique pronunciation would be the ancient form of the word "sens"; this is suggested by the Wiktionnaire; « sens » dans cette locution vient de « c’en » et il est prononcé \sɑ̃\, d’où une fréquente confusion avec « sans ». This is confirmed by the etymology in the TLFi ; Les loc. adv. sous B (sens dessus dessous,...


13

In both the video and Google Translate's pronunciation, I think I understand what you're hearing. It seems to be an implicit glide between the /ɑ̃/ and the /ɛ/ simply as a function of the first being further back: /ɑ/ is open back, whereas /ɛ/ is open-mid front. If a speaker is not very careful to articulate each sound distinctly (as is normal in spoken ...


13

No, standard French does not have the vowel /ɪ/ (near-close front unrounded vowel), which is the English “short i”. The vowel which is normally written with the letter I in French is a close front unrounded vowel, API symbol /i/. Its realization [i] is fairly stable across French speakers, at least in Europe.¹ Some Canadian speakers do pronounce [ɪ] in ...


13

Depending on the dialect of the speaker, schwa might be realised as [əʷ], [œ] or [ø]. Whatever this realisation might be, it's still its own phoneme, since it has a very different behaviour from /ø/: /ø/ can appear in both open and closed syllables for most speakers, while speakers who realise /ə/ as [ø] in open syllables (as your speaker did for monsieur) ...


12

A contrast between close-mid /o/ and open-mid /ɔ/ is present in many varieties of French. But the distribution of the two sounds varies between accents. Some accents have distinctions in vowel length as well as in vowel quality, but I think that most French learners are not taught an accent with vowel length distinctions. In some positions, the contrast is "...


12

The distinction between those sets of consonants isn't really in the configuration of the speech organs, but in the timing of the vocal folds' (lack of) vibration. Consonants such as /p, b, t, d, k and g/ are called stop consonants, because they're produced by completely stopping the airflow for a fraction of second, increasing the pressure in your vocal ...


11

The French generally spoken in France does not have [ɪ] either phonemically or phonetically, and to my knowledge no variety of French would use it for the first vowel in « s'il vous plait » (though the /l/ often disappears, leaving a shorter first syllable). To be clear — as you've since acknowledged — the terms "short" and "long" that we learn in ...


10

According to "l'Académie Française", it's because of the earlier use of it "ce en" (ce qui est en) dessus dessous, meaning "what is upside down". "Ce en" is then pronounced like "cent / sang / sans".


9

It depends on your reference point... What exactly does /məsjø/ mean to you? If you mean that you were trying to use a sound like the one in the last syllable of the English word "comma", or in the first syllable of the English word "manipulate", then don't do that. The English sounds transcribed as /ə/ are not very close to the French sounds transcribed as ...


8

That comes from a speech habit of the very young in France; it's called "zézayer" or colloquially "zozoter"; it consists in replacing the sounds "je" by the sound "ze". More precisely, "it's the defect in pronounciation that consists in substituting the sound "s" to the sound of "ch" and the sound "z" to the sound of "j". People look down on this speech ...


7

There is usually a very slight pause between fin and à un conflit but all these vowels might be also pronounced in a row. In poetry, hiatus tend to be avoided but in regular prose/speech, French has no problem with successive vowels, whether nasalized or not. For example, the sentence: Tu as en haut un houx aérien. has eight successive phonetic vowels /...


6

There's several contexts where a /ə/ might appear at the end of a word: 1. Wherever an historic /ə/ was present Unlike English that added ⟨e⟩ at the end of some words to indicate the previous vowel was long (O.E. mus, mys to modern mouse, mice), a graphical ⟨e⟩ in French always correlates with a vowel that used to be pronounced. Because the loss of word-...


6

This phenomenon is better known as "elision". In formal French, only a small set of words is subject to this rule. All are function words and most of them end in the unreduced vowel schwa /ə/ (the one exception is la).1 le la ; de ; je ; me te se ; ne ; que (and composite forms of que ) The edge cases are the fixed elisions c'est, s'il, s'ils, not ...


6

La tendance générale est souvent à l'amuïssement mais il y a de nombreuses exceptions, dont but : Les consonnes finales en latin ou devenues finales par la dispariton de la syllabe finale se sont généralement maintenues en anc. fr., puis se sont souvent amuïes par la suite. Les exceptions sont nombreuses. En particulier, des consonnes qui n'...


6

They indeed likely have more difficulty than Spanish, Italian and German kids who use much more regular spelling and phonetic rules. However, English speaking kids are reported to have more difficulties, given English spelling extreme irregularity. Excerpt from "Troubles dans l’apprentissage de la lecture, Anne-Marie Chartier s’entretient avec Franck ...


5

We could represent the deep phonology of américaine as /a.me.ʁi.kɛ.nə/, the final vowel being a schwa. However, in so-called Standard French, this final /ə/ is dropped in most contexts in words that end with a consonant + ‹e›. This includes masculine/feminine alternations such as américain~américaine. The result is a closed final syllable on the /ɛ/ : /a.me....


5

C'est une liaison qui est facultative, elle est souvent utilisée en musique, théâtre, poésie (orale), voire des discours, etc. Elle a une certaine connotation poétique et littéraire, un peu au même titre que les inversions qu'on rencontre surtout en poésie, mais elle n'est pas utilisée dans le langage courant.


5

Dictionaries They vary: The TLFi presents the [œ] pronunciation first, but also gives a list of the choices made by various dictionaries in the past, including: Spelling as déjeûner (to make it consistent with the [ø] pronunciation) in some dictionaries from the XVIIIth & XIXth Centuries, including the Dictionnaire de l’Académie française of 1740 ...


5

I don't think it's an exception so much as a way of pronouncing as /eXe/ the end of certain words that can also be pronounced as /ɛXe/, where X stands for some consonant sound. The same pronunciation is observed, for example, for all the verbs in -êter that I've found in wiktionary, such as Prêter / Apprêter Enquêter Arrêter S'entêter Étêter Embêter In ...


5

It's part of a more general phenomenon. Standard French makes a phonemic distinction between /e/ and /ɛ/, but in practice there are considerable phonetic variations between [e] and [ɛ], some regional, some depending on the speaker, and some free variations (where the same speaker might randomly pronounce the same phrase in one way or the other). A majority ...


5

One cannot say that the AU digraph (or the EAU trigraph ) is always pronounced /o/ in French. /o/ is only the most common pronunciation. AU/EAU is indeed almost always pronounced /o/ when standing alone (au, eau) or at the end of a word (bureau, beau). But there can be regional differences. One of the source I give states that /ɔ/ can be heard at the end of ...


5

Effectivement, j'ai aussi tendance à ne pas appliquer la prononciation normale du pluriel de « des bœufs bourguignons » lorsque'il s'agit de la locution : je mange [de.bœf.bur.gi.ɲɔ̃] le dimanche alors que je vois [de.bø.bur.gi.ɲɔ̃] dans un pré. De même pour « des œufs Kinder » [de.zœf.kin.dɛʁ] ne sont pas « des œufs durs » [de.zø.dyʁ], « des os à moelle » [...


5

In fact the pronunciation is phonemically /bɛʁg.sɔn/. The final is not nasalized because it's considered a foreign name. Foreign names are generally read more or less letter by letter, although there is considerable variation depending on the name and on the speaker. Until the 18th century (I think), foreign names used to be transcribed into French, then ...


5

Je ne suis pas l'auteur de la réponse, mais ce serait lié à une ancienne prononciation de Anne, qui serait Ânne. Il s'agit d'une vieille prononciation française que le Québec a conservée, comme beaucoup d'autres traits du français des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. Ce «a postérieur», comme l'appellent les linguistes parce qu'il est prononcé plus à l'...


5

Il me semble qu'il y a trois prononciations possibles: une sorte de coup de glotte nasalisé, avec ou sans ouvrir la bouche, que je ne vois pas comment écrire en alphabet phonétique. C'est le son le plus courant, et c'est celui qui me vient à l'esprit dans votre exemple « hum hum, ça va ». un raclement de gorge qui se termine en fermant les lèvres, qui est ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible