26

First, a correction: "est-ce que" comes before yes/no questions. "qu'est-ce que" or "qu'est-ce qui" (depending on if the "what" in the question is the object or subject, respectively) comes before what questions. It's usually best not to try to directly equate phrasings of one language to phrasings of another. What "est-ce que" really "means" is that "what'...


23

"De qui parles-tu ?" would be a perfectly normal thing to say to a close friend, even if some would notice the effort on the construction of the sentence. If you want to make it sound really casual, just don't invert the verb and the subject: "De qui tu parles ?". This is an extremely common thing to do in French. Other examples of transformation from well-...


19

Does such a thing as question tags exist in French? Yes, the closest equivalent is "n'est-ce-pas ?" which is much simpler as it stays invariable unlike the English form. However, it is not that much used nowadays and is becoming too formal and quite outdated, at least in France. — Tu n'a pas mangé, n'est-ce-pas ? — Si, j'ai mangé. or — Non, je n'ai ...


18

Quantième is in theory the correct term, but it's high literary at best these days. Although it may not be recognized by dictionaries, combientième will be understood by everyone. e.g. "7 milliards d’humains sur Terre. Et vous, vous êtes le combientième ?" Le quantième es-tu qui ait eu une copie ? (literary, might give a native speaker pause, at least in ...


18

In formal language, affirmations have subject – verb – object complements order and yes/no questions have verb – subject – object complements order. So, Vous êtes beau is an affirmation. Êtes-vous beau ? is a yes/no question. (If the subject is not already a pronoun, it comes first and a pronoun is added after the verb to form questions. E.g. Pierre est-il ...


16

Est-ce que tu peux me passer le sel, s'il te plaît ? Yes, this is fine. Note that there could be (at least) three ways of asking this question: Est-ce que tu peux me passer le sel, s'il te plaît ? Peux-tu me passer le sel, s'il te plaît ? Tu peux me passer le sel, s'il te plaît ? (the latter is more likely to be pronounced faster, "s'te'plaît") I presume ...


16

First, “what's going on” will usually be translated by “qu'est-ce qu'il se passe”, sometimes “qu'est-ce qu'il y a” when anticipating a problem. It can also be translated as “qu'est-ce que c'est” but only in specific cases, for example, when you just heard some strange noise. The phrase “qu'est-ce que c'est” is indeed strange, but very common and standard. I ...


16

Joubarc is right, you don't actually need to; in fact, many Quebeckers don't use it in formal situations (though I have never met one who does not use it otherwise). Of course, it should never be used in most texts. If you do wish to use it for any reason, this “tu” actually replaces “est-ce que”, but is placed after the conjugated verb. You can use it with ...


14

La forme grammaticalement correcte et la plus soutenue est « téléphoné-je à la police ». De manière générale, lorsque l'on inverse le verbe et le sujet et que le verbe est à la première personne singulier de l'indicatif présent, le verbe prend la terminaison é au lieu de e. Pour les verbes du deuxième groupe et les verbes irréguliers, il n'y a pas de telle ...


14

You can use the expression tous les combien: Tous les combien, interroge sur la fréquence : L'autobus passe tous les combien ? Note there is no s at the end of combien since the latter is an invariable noun (masculine): Le combien (nom masculin invariable), indique le quantième du mois, le rang : Le combien sommes-nous ? Le combien est-il au ...


14

First, "Où est-ce que tu vais?" is incorrect. The correct sentence is "Où est-ce que tu vas ?" Short answer: "Où est-ce que ma chaise est ?" is correct. Long answer: "est-ce que" is used in order to keep the order between the subject and the verb. For "Ma chaise est là." the following sentences are correct: "Où est ma chaise ?" "Où ma chaise est-elle ?" "...


13

First let's rule out "Est-ce que correct si...", which is obviously... not correct. :) "Est-ce que je peux..." is the natural way of asking, and the one I would usually use as a native speaker. The use of "pouvoir" really means we are asking for permission here. Is it ok if I smoke here? Est-ce que je peux fumer ici ? As you said though, the ...


12

Le journaliste a vraisemblablement fait une confusion entre ces deux structures possibles : Combien de Français sont concernés par cette réforme ? et Les Français sont-ils concernés par cette réforme ? Une autre possibilité correcte aurait été : Combien y a-t-il de Français concernés par cette réforme ?


12

I would personally say: Sur quoi devrions-nous le baser? The two phrasings you have suggested seem incorrect to me.


12

As a native I would say : Où est-ce qu'est ma chaise? Où est ma chaise? I think you do not say Où est-ce que ma chaise est? or at least I never hear people using it. Maybe because it is not a pronom, because Où est-ce qu'elle est? is used. Maybe because there is nothing behind because Où est-ce que ma chaise est passée? is also used. I do not know ...


11

It's always depend of the language level because "ok" is never used in "correct" or writing form. Speaking with a friend for a party "Is it ok if I bring my sister ?" will probably be "J'emmène ma soeur, ok ?" (forcing) or "C'est ok si j’amène ma soeur ?" (asking) or "Est-ce que je peux emmener ma soeur ?" (mail/sms). But to a stranger in front of a ...


11

Oui, c'est correct. Si ça vous embête de rajouter "est-ce que" à chaque fois, vous pouvez faire comme 90% des français quand ils parlent et dire simplement: L'accent est un problème pour toi? C'est exactement comme la phrase affirmative, mais avec un ton interrogatif. D'autre part, il serait plus naturel de dire: L'accent te pose problème? ou si ...


11

Normalement, dans une phrase interrogative il y a inversion du sujet. Comment devient-il agréable ? Quand le sujet est complexe, on devrait avoir *Comment devient un lieu agréable ? qui ne se dit pas. On laisse le sujet en place, et on utilise un pronom de reprise : Comment un lieu devient-il agréable ? L'absence du pronom de reprise n'est pas ...


11

“Combien de temps“ is right, but “passe-t-il” is not. The appropriate sentence here is “durer” (“to last”) and your sentence should be “Combien de temps ce film dure-t-il ?“ or “Combien de temps dure ce film ?“. Note that “Combien de temps dure-t-il ce film ?“ is erroneous as well. Moreover, while “Combien de temps est-ce que nous y resterons ?” is ...


11

Il y a plusieurs manières de poser cette question, par exemple : Le matin, tu te lèves à quelle heure ? (Attention aux accents) À quelle heure est-ce que tu te lèves le matin ? À quelle heure te lèves-tu le matin ? La question 1 est surtout utilisée à l'oral, en langage familier. Par contre, la question 3 est la forme la plus soignée. Ce ne sont ...


10

"Il est quelle heure ?" is correct when you are speaking. I've never seen it in a text (except in written dialogue). In general, this word order seems to belong to the familiar register, but it's perfectly okay for more formal situations as well (for example, when a boss asks his/her employees). With the other order of words "Quelle heure est-il ?", it ...


9

There is no good direct translation I can think of, one would rather say “are you doing it often” and depending on the answer ask further “at which frequency”. Allez-vous souvent à la piscine? (Are you often going to the swimming pool?) Oui, régulièrement (Yes regularly) Ah oui? À quelle fréquence ? (Really? How often?) Deux fois par semaine (Twice ...


9

I would say "Comment a-t-il l'air d'aller ?" or simply "Comment va-t-il ?". "De quoi a-t-il l'air ?" is possible too, but it refers more to the physical appearance.


9

Even though this is more or less a duplicate, I'll add an explanation that I didn't see when skimming previous answers. The subject pronouns are clitics, which have some fascinating properties but are perhaps best summarized as being between words and affixes. They're smaller and less independent than words, but more than affixes. Now let's see how this ...


8

Because you can revert the subject and the verb only when the subject is a pronoun (probably for euphonic reasons). So when the subject is a noun (or a noun group), it is kept before the verb and the corresponding pronoun is added after the verb.


8

As a complement to rangzen answer, I would also use (Est-ce que) ça va si ... ? (Est-ce que) ça dérange si ... ? (Est-ce que) ça pose un problème si ... ?


8

The grammatically correct formal sentence would be: De quel instrument jouez-vous ? A still grammatical spoken French: De quel instrument est-ce que vous jouez ? In non formal, real life, you'll more often hear the casual : Vous jouez de quel instrument ? or even: Tu joues (de) quoi comme instrument ?


8

“Qu'as fait tu ?” is not correct. According to francaisfacile.com (emphasis mine), in questions: On conjugue un verbe impérativement en plaçant le pronom sujet a) après le verbe aux temps simples et b) après l'auxiliaire aux temps composés. So the correct phrasing is Qu'as-tu fait ? And the negation: Que n'as-tu pas fait ?


8

I would tend to agree with your characterization of tone as informal (only when speaking anyway), est-ce que being fairly standard/neutral/common these days, and the inversion being more formal - although as you note, there are expressions where the inversion is natural. At least for the first two examples you give, I would see nothing wrong with the way ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible