Skip to main content
22 votes
Accepted

Is "De qui parles-tu" (for example) as formal as its English equivalent, or is it normal for the French to casually say that ?

"De qui parles-tu ?" would be a perfectly normal thing to say to a close friend, even if some would notice the effort on the construction of the sentence. If you want to make it sound really casual, ...
OddBrew's user avatar
  • 336
18 votes

In the sentence "Tu l'as acheté où ce pantalon ?". what does the "l" apart of the "l'as" do?

Technically, the sentence is missing a comma: Tu l'as acheté où, ce pantalon ? To parse it, better to first ignore the trailing part that is optional. That reads: Tu l'as acheté où ? or the ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
14 votes
Accepted

Can I end an "est-ce que" question with "est'?

Short answer: "Où est-ce que ma chaise est ?" is correct. Long answer: "est-ce que" is used in order to keep the order between the subject and the verb. For "Ma chaise est là.&...
Dorian Turba's user avatar
14 votes

Can I end an "est-ce que" question with "est'?

As a native I would say : Où est-ce qu'est ma chaise? Où est ma chaise? I think you do not say Où est-ce que ma chaise est? or at least I never hear people using it. Maybe because it is not a ...
guillau4's user avatar
  • 766
12 votes

"Que devrions-nous le baser dessus" or "Que devrions-nous le baser sur"?

I would personally say: Sur quoi devrions-nous le baser? The two phrasings you have suggested seem incorrect to me.
Nico Mezeret's user avatar
  • 1,924
11 votes
Accepted

Is this the correct way to ask "What time do you get up in the morning?"

Il y a plusieurs manières de poser cette question, par exemple : Le matin, tu te lèves à quelle heure ? (Attention aux accents) À quelle heure est-ce que tu te lèves le matin ? À quelle heure te ...
Ramiro's user avatar
  • 288
11 votes
Accepted

How do I properly word this question in French?

To correct your proposals: Quelle est ta chanson préférée de lui ? De ses chansons, quelle est ta préférée ? (chanson is a feminine noun). Or other suggestions: Laquelle de ses chansons préfères-tu ...
Sacha's user avatar
  • 1,529
9 votes

How to say: How does he look like? Happy, sad?

I would say "Comment a-t-il l'air d'aller ?" or simply "Comment va-t-il ?". "De quoi a-t-il l'air ?" is possible too, but it refers more to the physical appearance.
Anne Aunyme's user avatar
  • 6,394
9 votes
Accepted

"Pourquoi l'hôtel est-il complet?" Why est-il and not just est?

Even though this is more or less a duplicate, I'll add an explanation that I didn't see when skimming previous answers. The subject pronouns are clitics, which have some fascinating properties but ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
  • 19.5k
9 votes

Choosing Between Intonation/Est-ce que/Inversion Question Forms

I would tend to agree with your characterization of tone as informal (only when speaking anyway), est-ce que being fairly standard/neutral/common these days, and the inversion being more formal - ...
Frank's user avatar
  • 9,657
9 votes
Accepted

“Que” vs. “Qu'est-ce que”

They are equivalent in meaning. The form with the subject and verb inverted is more formal. In general, the order of question formality from most to least looks like this: Subject-verb inversion ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
  • 19.5k
8 votes
Accepted

Placement of ne and pas to mean “What have you not done?”

“Qu'as fait tu ?” is not correct. According to francaisfacile.com (emphasis mine), in questions: On conjugue un verbe impérativement en plaçant le pronom sujet a) après le verbe aux temps ...
Thomas Francois's user avatar
8 votes

"Qui sommes nous ?" ou "Qui sommes-nous ?"

Seule la forme avec trait d'union est correcte. Quand un pronom personnel suit un verbe à la forme interrogative et qu'il en est le sujet, un trait d'union doit être présent. La réforme ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
8 votes
Accepted

"Qui sommes nous ?" ou "Qui sommes-nous ?"

Plusieurs sources fiables indiquent que le trait d’union doit être utilisé lorsque le verbe précède le pronom, que ce soit dans la tournure interrogative (Qui sommes-nous ?) ou dans les incises («...
Pas un clue's user avatar
  • 11.4k
8 votes

Differences between “pas vrai ?”, “c’est ça ?”, “hein ?”, and “n’est-ce pas ?”

The translation for each would be pas vrai - no way (when being astonished, not very formal) or right (common) c'est ça - is that it (common) n'est-il pas - isn't it (formal) "Hein" doesn't really ...
Maryannah's user avatar
  • 600
8 votes
Accepted

Is "à quoi conduis-tu les enfants?" correct?

C'est bien « où conduis-tu les enfants ? », car l'école est un lieu.
Amatchi's user avatar
  • 96
8 votes

How can I say "Vous nous appelez quand?" with an inverted structure?

Vous nous appelez. > Nous appelez-vous ? Vous nous appelez demain. > Quand nous appelez-vous ? The basic rule: Invert the subject and the verb. But when you do so, if there's an object pronoun,...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
  • 19.5k
7 votes

How do you say "how is your X going on"?

That's kinda broad and you will have several translations depending on what you're asking. In a lot of them, the expression Se Passer would make a great fit. For instance: How is your day going? ...
Azami's user avatar
  • 726
7 votes
Accepted

Meaning of "Qu'est-ce qu'il y a?"

It means "What's up?", "What's happening?". Translated literally, it means "what is there?": "il y a" means "there is" and you turn it into a question. In this context, the friend is asking what the ...
N.I.'s user avatar
  • 3,122
7 votes

"Is/Are there any more..."?

Your first sentence: Est-ce qu'il y a aucun pain ? doesn't work. It somewhat means Is there no bread? Possible ways to express what you are looking for are: Est-ce qu'il y a encore du pain ? ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
7 votes
Accepted

Inversion de 'Il y en a un'

"Y en a-t-il" is not the exact interrogative form of "Il y en a un". Question : Y en a-t-il ? Réponses : Oui. ... il y en a, mais on ne sait pas combien (au moins un, mais peut-être plus). ...
Destal's user avatar
  • 3,725
7 votes
Accepted

Comment on dit "not anymore" en Français?

Je ne fume plus. Plus maintenant J'ai arreté de fumer!
sapienz's user avatar
  • 504
7 votes
Accepted

How to answer "ça a été ?" ?

Here are some suggestions but of course there may be plenty of other possibilities: Very usual (at the restaurant, for example): C'était très bon, merci. Tout s'est bien passé, merci. Common, ...
Mistalis's user avatar
  • 1,856
7 votes

Is "qui" as a question word always singular?

TL;DR: dans une question, lorsque « qui » est le sujet, « qui » est considéré comme singulier et le verbe s'accorde en conséquence. Les questions commençant par « Qui sont ... » existent mais alors « ...
xhienne's user avatar
  • 517
7 votes
Accepted

"Où qu'ils sont"?

"Où que" is a reinforced question word, exactly equivalent to a simple "où" or to "où est-ce que" or "où c'est que". Those reinforced forms aren't unique to &...
Eau qui dort's user avatar
  • 9,879
7 votes

Sens de « qu'est-ce que » dans deux contextes particuliers

L'expression "Qu'est-ce que", dans tous ces contextes-là, a le sens de "pourquoi" mais indique surtout la surprise et l'irritation du locuteur, ou la consternation. Pour ce qui est des raisons de ce ...
qoba's user avatar
  • 6,736
7 votes

Differences between “pas vrai ?”, “c’est ça ?”, “hein ?”, and “n’est-ce pas ?”

"hein?" is a very informal sound-word. It is used a bit like the Canadian "eh?" at the end of sentences. It can also be used like the English "what?" to mark surprise, disbelief. -On se voit à ...
BuggyMelon's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Usage of " si bon que ça ? "

It's a question asked as a reply to a statement about something/someone being very good. — Il est si bon aux échecs que tu n'as aucune chance de le battre ! — Si bon que ça ? — Ces chocolats, ils sont ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
7 votes

How to ask someone about their French language proficiency?

Quel est ton niveau en français ? Informal: C'est quoi ton niveau en français ? Tu te débrouilles comment en français ?
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 151k
6 votes

Qu'est-ce que c'est ce qu'est-ce que c'est d'hangar à grain ?

Tout ce que je vais dire est à prendre avec des pincettes. Voilà comment je comprends le gag : ils utilisent "qu'est-ce que c'est" comme on utiliserait les termes suivants : "un putain d'hangar à ...
Destal's user avatar
  • 3,725

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible