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In passé composé, you need to choose an auxiliary verb, either aller or être. French teachers usually simplify the rule and say: If a verb is on the DMV list, use être. J'ai parlé → Not DMV. Use avoir. Je suis sorti → DMV. Use être. The full rule throws a small wrench in the gears. A DMV verb only uses être if it has no direct object. (Also, any verb can ...


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I'll give you an example, in French, you'd say: Il est allé marcher (he went for a walk) and not Il a allé marcher Because 'Aller' belongs to the 'Vandertrampp list'. In other words, you'd use the 'être' auxiliary verb, not the 'avoir'. To be honest I had never heard about that list, and I wouldn't apply it to the letter. For instance, the first M is ...


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