18

Technically, the sentence is missing a comma: Tu l'as acheté où, ce pantalon ? To parse it, better to first ignore the trailing part that is optional. That reads: Tu l'as acheté où ? or the variants où tu l'as acheté ? and où l'as-tu acheté ? (formal) This clearly translates to Where did you buy it? But the person speaking wants to make sure you know ...


11

To correct your proposals: Quelle est ta chanson préférée de lui ? De ses chansons, quelle est ta préférée ? (chanson is a feminine noun). Or other suggestions: Laquelle de ses chansons préfères-tu ? Laquelle de ses chansons tu préfères ? (oral context) Quelle est sa chanson que tu préfères ? Laquelle de ses chansons est ta préférée ? C'est quoi ta ...


8

C'est bien « où conduis-tu les enfants ? », car l'école est un lieu.


4

The grammar is quite loose, especially if the singular quelqu'un is used, but this "en" refers to the person(s) interested in what is being discussed. e.g. (wikipedia discussion): ...soit ça n’intéresse pas les lecteurs, soit, si ça en intéresse quelqu’un, ça ne peut l’intéresser que pour savoir pour chaque mot si ça y est ou pas. Quelqu'un des ...


4

Could you please explain what is the difference between them? Où means where. Où allez-vous ? : Where are you going? D'où means from where. D'où venez vous ? : Where do you come from? Why don't we use "À où allez-vous?"? Because it is not idiomatic and the à wouldn't add any piece of information anyway. Combinations with où are possible though, ...


3

All but the third one are correct French, but none of them is asking a person's name. 1 and 2 are asking someone if he is Philippe (and not someone else). (Are you Philippe?) Alternatives are C'est vous, Philippe ? 4 is asking someone if someone else is Philippe. (Is he Philippe?) To ask someone if his name is Philippe, you might say: (Est-ce que) vous vous ...


3

To complete the previous answers. As said, the "correct" sentence would need an additional comma to look like : "Tu l'as acheté où, ce pantalon ?" As stated by others, the 2nd part of the sentence is to remind what we are talking about, and that second part is optional. So without the optional part the sentence would be : "Tu l'as ...


2

"As" is in all circumstances needed because it is the verb "avoir" in the second person singular used here as the necessary auxiliary for the tense, this tense being "passé composé". You may nevertheless ask what is "le" (l') doing there. This is a case of "dislocation à droite" (Wiktionnaire). (Grammaire) ...


2

La forme interrogative est fournie par "savez-vous". Le reste de la phrase n'a pas à utiliser l'inversion du sujet. Seule la première forme est donc correcte. Ça peut être plus clair avec une autre phrase, voisine: Savez-vous ce que je dois faire? On voit ici tout de suite que la double inversion est incorrecte: Savez-vous ce que dois-je faire?


2

In passé composé, you need to choose an auxiliary verb, either aller or être. French teachers usually simplify the rule and say: If a verb is on the DMV list, use être. J'ai parlé → Not DMV. Use avoir. Je suis sorti → DMV. Use être. The full rule throws a small wrench in the gears. A DMV verb only uses être if it has no direct object. (Also, any verb can ...


1

I'll give you an example, in French, you'd say: Il est allé marcher (he went for a walk) and not Il a allé marcher Because 'Aller' belongs to the 'Vandertrampp list'. In other words, you'd use the 'être' auxiliary verb, not the 'avoir'. To be honest I had never heard about that list, and I wouldn't apply it to the letter. For instance, the first M is ...


1

You can find your answer here: https://www.etudes-litteraires.com/forum/discussion/34632/difference-entre-dou-et-ou I will try to gather the most important points and provide some translation hints. (...), où concerne le lieu où l'on est (Où est ton frère ? ) ou le lieu vers lequel on se dirige (Où vas-tu ?), et d'où la provenance, le lieu d'où l'on vient (...


1

Unlike in English, you can't end a sentence with dans so both of your attempts are incorrect. Here are various possibilities: Où Marion est-elle ? Où se trouve Marion ? Où est Marion ? (better) If you really want to keep the dans but the question sounds odd: Dans quoi est Marion ? In spoken French, inversion is usually avoided: Elle est où, Marion ? ...


1

à l'écrit on utilise la première forme pour une affirmation. Pour résoudre ... , je dois contacter le service client. la seconde pour une question Pour résoudre ... , dois-je contacter le ministre ? Dans le cas présent, savez-vous entraine déjà la forme interrogative, les deux possibilités me paraissent acceptable. La seconde forme est plus formelle.


1

The first two are used if you are asking the person directly. The third is mainly used if you are asking someone else about Philippe, but it is more or less not the best formulation. The fourth could be used in both cases. Two more ways could be used if you are talking to Philippe directly. Etes-vous Philippe? Or in an inquisitive tone: Monsieur Philippe?...


1

You can substitute also "arriver à" for "faire pour": "....comment moi, je suis arrivé à apprendre le sens..." I came to learn the meaning... This construction may make it more obvious that a goal is being sought after and then achieved


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible