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42 votes

What languages are perceived as classy or fancy to French speakers?

I'll add my two cents from a translation angle, even though I don't have a solid answer. This is an excellent question from the point of view of a translator, because it gets at an issue translators ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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35 votes
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What languages are perceived as classy or fancy to French speakers?

I really don't think there's an equivalent. French has a particular status for other countries, but I can't see a language that would be the same for French. Not at the same level at least. Maybe ...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
24 votes

Why does everyone in The Lord of the Rings use "vous" ?

(French native here) You probably have been taught, as a simplifed rule, that 'vous' should be used for plural or to emphasize politeness, and 'tu' for singular/close relationship. As already answered ...
Sylvain's user avatar
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22 votes
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Is "De qui parles-tu" (for example) as formal as its English equivalent, or is it normal for the French to casually say that ?

"De qui parles-tu ?" would be a perfectly normal thing to say to a close friend, even if some would notice the effort on the construction of the sentence. If you want to make it sound really casual, ...
OddBrew's user avatar
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21 votes

What languages are perceived as classy or fancy to French speakers?

Probably Latin. Some examples of Latin words or phrases that a native French speaker could use to sound posh: ab abrupto instead of abruptement ad honores instead of pour l'honneur ergo instead ...
KPM's user avatar
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18 votes

What languages are perceived as classy or fancy to French speakers?

There is no such language in France. I think we need to take a step back: Why is French perceived as "fancy" or "classy"? From the Wikipedia History of French: Modern French article: From the ...
Matthieu M.'s user avatar
14 votes

Why does everyone in The Lord of the Rings use "vous" ?

One possible reason is that the film is translated from English, which does not make distinction between tu and vous. This is however not very likely (at least, if we are dealing with the official ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
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12 votes
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Couldn't we use "du coup" in written French?

Du coup is widely used in written French, but you will find that some people follow the recommandation of the Académie Française of not using it as a synonym of donc and only use it in the sense of ...
None's user avatar
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10 votes

Les différents langages du français

Comme l'écrivait déjà Louis Meigret en 1530 : Nous écrivons un langage qui n'est point en usage, et usons d'une langue qui n'a point d'écriture en France. Cité par Bernard Cerquiglini, L'accent ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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9 votes
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Pourquoi "jusqu'à aujourd'hui" au lieu de "jusqu'aujourd'hui" ?

Mis à part les étymologistes et les curieux qui s'intéressent à la langue, l'étymologie du mot est complètement oubliée par la très grande majorité des francophones. Aujourd'hui est perçu comme une ...
None's user avatar
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7 votes

Couldn't we use "du coup" in written French?

I have no idea why someone would say that, at least for its meaning (and I know of no others) of "as such, by the same token". It's a perfectly valid locution at most language levels. It's in the ...
Circeus's user avatar
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6 votes
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How to rephrase the colloquial « ça de moins » in writing or more formal speech?

Here is a rather simple formal phrasing: Cela fera une chose de moins à organiser.
Stéphane Gimenez's user avatar
6 votes

Adverbial usage of "direct"

Adverbial usage of direct is indeed informal. Directement is often the formal equivalent but here, tout net sounds better: Quand je l’ai vu, ça m’a refroidi tout net. There are plenty of verbs that ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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6 votes
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Emploi de "mascotte"

En français de France, on utilise volontiers ce terme. Si tu n’es pas en France, peut-être est-ce pour cette raison ? Par ailleurs, je tiens à souligner qu’il y a le plus souvent une dimension ...
Maël's user avatar
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6 votes

Does 'madame' work the same in French as American ma'am?

It is good to say this and the most respectful way : Bonjour Madame … Bonjour Monsieur … If you know the name you can add it after. It is not outdated but recommended.
Ptit Xav's user avatar
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5 votes
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« He that hath a ill name is half hanged » ?

Un proverbe français proche mais pas très connu est : Le bruit pend l'homme. Dictionnaire des proverbes françois, 1758:
jlliagre's user avatar
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5 votes
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"Comme prévu", "comme convenu", "comme promis", "comme demandé", "comme (déjà) évoqué", "comme démontré (précédemment)", etc

La construction comme + participe passé présente une ellipse du sujet et de l'auxiliaire. Comme introduit dans ce cas une comparaison et est synonyme de ainsi que. Pour moi il ne s'agit pas de ...
None's user avatar
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5 votes
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When to use the first person plural form of imperative mood (disons, considérons, supposons, etc.)

L'impératif est un mode délicat à utiliser. J'ai toujours hésité à l'employer en public tant je le trouve frôlant l'incorrection. Je crois même ne l'avoir jamais utilisé qu'avec mes propres enfants.(...
MC68020's user avatar
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4 votes
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How to distinguish "rather" formal register from neutral register?

I’m afraid this will also be a non-answer to your question, but it may shed some light on how opinions vary, and show how one might see green where another sees blue. I’ll start with a very localised ...
Pas un clue's user avatar
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4 votes

What languages are perceived as classy or fancy to French speakers?

English, by far. Some time ago the French would adopt English words when there was no pithy French equivalent, such as "marketing," "sandwich," or "weekend" for example. That is just practical ...
ssimm's user avatar
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4 votes

« He that hath a ill name is half hanged » ?

Je ne propose ni un proverbe, ni une phrase célèbres, mais une chanson célèbre: La mauvaise réputation de Georges Brassens. Je ne fais pourtant de tort à personne, En suivant les ch’mins qui ne ...
mouviciel's user avatar
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4 votes

Is “Comment vas-tu” formal or casual?

Comment vas-tu ? is a formal way to ask "how are you?" to someone you tutoie. The casual way is: Comment tu vas ? or just Ça va ?
jlliagre's user avatar
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4 votes
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Contexte et orthographe du mot « feedback »

« Rétroaction » n'est jamais employé pour désigner feedback dans le sens du retour d'expérience. Il est employé dans d'autres domaines, notamment juridique, mais pas dans le sens très répandu du ...
JKHA's user avatar
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4 votes

Does 'madame' work the same in French as American ma'am?

It's not archaic and it is commonly used. At least in some formal contexts, omitting madame or monsieur after bonjour when talking to an unknown person might be considered to be rude.
jlliagre's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does everyone in The Lord of the Rings use "vous" ?

As a short answer and addition to the other answers: Is this some kind of archaism that is supposed to give me medieval courtesy vibes? Yes, mostly. It would feel weird, too casual and anachronistic ...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
3 votes

L'adjectif « malaisant » : France ou Québec, registre, etc. ?

Malaisant vient directement de l'anglais "awkward" qui désigne une situation ou une personne gênante. Le mot est très populaire, en particulier chez les jeunes. Les québécois sont plus exposés et ...
Teleporting Goat's user avatar
3 votes
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L'adjectif « malaisant » : France ou Québec, registre, etc. ?

Je ne sais pas s’il y a un lien direct entre le très disparu verbe malaiser et l’adjectif malaisant, mais j’aurais tendence à penser que son action fut plutôt indirecte. Je verrais que la notion de «&...
Pas un clue's user avatar
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