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10

The meaning is: I got a 20 on my homework/assignment. (i.e. I got an A+) Traditional homework/assignment rating in French schools is based on a score ranging from 0 to 20 so this is (in theory1) the best possible score. In France, this grading is the official one from the middle school up to the universities and grandes écoles. Primary schools might use ...


5

The Wikipedia article Le parler marseillais mentions that the word "guirri" is used in Marseille and has been borrowed from Comorian; it means "someone strong, brave". (rem: I am not at all a local from Marseille and had never heard/read this word before, so any comment from a native speaker of that region on the actual usage of this word is welcome).


5

On peut lire dans le Dictionnaire Français-Argot d'Aristide Bruant (1905) : On dit de choses sans valeur que c'est de la Chiasse, de la Fichaise, de la Gnognotte, de la Merde, de la Merde en bâton, de la Petite bière, de la Rinçure de cuvette, de la Roupie, de la Roupie de sansonnet ou de singe, de la Rousselette, de la Roustampe ou Roustamponne, de la ...


4

Tablette est de loin le terme le plus courant. Tablette désigne une plaque le plus souvent rectangulaire, prédécoupée par moulage, et par extension, peut aussi être utilisé pour parler de la musculature abdominale quand elle a un peu le même aspect. Plaque et plaquette sont des synonymes plus rares. On parle aussi de plaque de chocolat quand il s'agit d'...


4

There isn't really such a thing as one right translation for every scenario. The context would determine the exact phrasing, as well as the type of logical connection suggested by the phrasing. All of the above are fine, as well as "That implies" or "That's no different than" or any number of equivalent expressions. "That means" is a very good catch-all ...


3

Foutre au tapis is slang for the expression mettre au tapis which means literally "to put someone on the carpet / on the floor" (i.e. to put someone down). It originates in combat sports such as boxing where when you are au tapis, the referee starts to count and you are out if you don't stand up before 10 is reached. There is also aller au tapis which means ...


3

Personnellement, je n'ai jamais entendu plaquette de chocolat. Dans mon entourage, on dit toujours tablette de chocolat.


3

A pince-fesse is a slang term for formal "dinner" / "reception" / "gala". We have several ass-related terms to describe the art of (decent) behaviour (balais dans le..., cul-serré, ...) :-) In your context : J'en ai marre de tout ça. Les journalistes, *les trucs officiels,* les discours, les salamalecs avec des gens dont j'en n'ai rien à foutre. C'est lourd....


2

Salamalecs (most ofthen used in the plural) are exaggerated shows of politeness, eg when greeting or welcoming someone at a formal event. The word has a negative connotation, being used to stress how time-consuming, hypocritical or meaningless they can be. See https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/salamalec


2

There is clearly a sports metaphor: the word passe means the action of passing the ball in football/soccer, so it makes sense to make an allusion to it when commenting a football match. There are numerous crude jokes in French about the double-meaning of passe (which can also be an act of sexual intercourse with a prostitute), but that does not seem to be ...


2

As Jlliagre said, Tests in France are often graded on 20. So "20" is short for "20/20" ("vingt sur vingt"). I'll add that "devoirs" (plural) is homework, but "un devoir" is a test or a graded assignment, often called "devoir maison" (or "DM") when it's to be done at home. The singular "devoir" is almost never used for ungraded homework anymore. Note: this ...


2

Je ne crois que ce soit une expression formelle (contrairement à des termes comme frasil ou embâcle). C'est parfaitement compréhensible pour quiconque a déjà eu affaire à une grosse tempête de neige, mais ça se range plutôt dans la famille de terme comme canicule ou été des indiens. Le premier n'a pas de définition technique (Environnement canada n'émet que ...


2

"un point c'est tout" is added by someone who just spoke to say "full stop, I don't want any further argument about this." "et toc" is said by someone who listens to other people's talk or the like to mean "he got him/them, well said, good point ..." or something similar. I take it as the noise of an arrow or stab hitting its target. It was a more frequent ...


2

In familiar French or in argot, se faire someone or something means to do something to them or with them for your pleasure or for your benefit. What the "something" is should then be understood from the context. Ex: On va se faire un cinéma (ie, we are going to the movies) ça te dirait de se faire un Italien ? (ie, what about going to an Italian ...


1

In this sentence "hubris" develops on "démesure". A similar construction: Pour mon petit-déjeuner j'ai mangé un pain au chocolat, ou chocolatine comme on dit à Bordeaux. For my breakfast I had a pain au chocolat, also called chocolatine in Bordeaux. The meaning of your sentence is that to be good in "chrono" (time trials), you have to be not too ...


1

The hubris (ὕβρις) is the loss of the sense of measure (phronesis, or φρόνησις - sometimes translated caution or sagacity). Le contre-la-montre (chrono) is the middle between hubris and phronesis (a quite aristotelician point of view).


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