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26 votes
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"Nous on sera les bons"

This is a classic case of French redundancy, and it is very common in informal speech. It serves to emphasize the importance of who is doing what. What's confusing you is probably the lack of a ...
cccg03's user avatar
  • 2,274
23 votes

Does "sans Adaptateur" mean that no adapter is provided?

Bonjour, "Sans adaptateur" peut aussi être interprété comme "Ce produit n'a pas besoin d'adaptateur", ce qui peut amener à la confusion. Je vous conseille d'utiliser les formulations du commentaire ...
WillVailla's user avatar
21 votes
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Un titre « clickbait » : l'emploi en adjectif ?

Le français ne permet pas de passer d'un nom à un adjectif ou à un verbe aussi facilement que l'anglais. Il n'est par ailleurs pas possible de construire un nouveau mot en en accolant deux. Dès lors, ...
radouxju's user avatar
  • 5,585
16 votes

Le mot « avoir », peut-il signifier « manger » ?

On peut dire tout ça, mais le sens n'est pas exactement identique : J'ai mangé de la pizza : Pas de doute sur la consommation. J'ai eu de la pizza : On m'a donné de la pizza, je n'avais peut-...
jlliagre's user avatar
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16 votes
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Usage of "offrir" and "donner"?

Offrir is to give someone a present. Mes parents m'ont offert un stylo pour mon anniversaire. It can also be used for non material things, for example : Il m'a offert son amitié.1 Il m'a offert ...
None's user avatar
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16 votes
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Does the word 'culte' have the same negative connotations in French as in English?

This is actually part of a famous pair of false friends: What's usually referred to as a cult in English is called a secte in French, while a culte in French is closer to the English worship or to ...
Eau qui dort's user avatar
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15 votes
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What is the connotation of using "lui" as the subject of a sentence?

Emphasis and opposition1. You use a tonic third person pronoun to insist on the fact they do something but others don't. Lui parle français. That one speak French (but not the other ones) J'ai ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 147k
13 votes
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The usage of "le pays de..."

This expression would be used in french to describe a place where something is plentiful, or from where something originates. Off the top of my head an example is France sometimes being referred to ...
Nico Mezeret's user avatar
  • 1,924
13 votes
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Comment traduire la phrase complète “I struggle” en français, en parlant de ce que quelqu'un fait dans la vie ?

Une traduction possible pourrait être : Je galère. C'est moins pessimiste que "je souffre" (qui est complètement passif).
N.I.'s user avatar
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13 votes
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What is the appropriate response when tasting a wine when it’s presented to you in a restaurant?

A simple slow nod of the head is usually enough to indicate the wine is good/accepted. If there’s a desire to add something vocally, not a bad idea by any mean, a simple “oui” or “c’est bien/c’est bon”...
Pas un clue's user avatar
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13 votes
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How to interpret "faire" + activities

The context usually tells what elle fait du judo means, e.g.: – Elle est où ? Elle fait quoi, en ce moment ? – Elle fait du judo. (she's doing it right now) – Elle fait quoi le samedi ? – Elle fait ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 147k
12 votes

Why does "si" sometimes mean "if" and other times "so"?

Si "if" is from Latin sī "if". Straightforward enough. Si "so", "so much", and even "yes" is from Latin sīc "in that way". A vestige of that ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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12 votes
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Que veut dire « il joue la caille de cité » ?

C'est du français parlé, pas spécifiquement vulgaire; « ce (sic) l'a (sic) jouer caille de cité » veut dire : se la jouer « racaille de cité » se la jouer = prétendre être, se faire passer pour......
jlliagre's user avatar
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12 votes
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What does les eaux mean in the plural?

"Water" as in English can designate a or some particular waters or water by its substance (same case as "fire", for instance). Often, "l'eau" using singular is relative ...
lemon's user avatar
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12 votes
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What does "en avoir" mean?

What Barthes says is that modern intellectuals try to be "real men" (and not men who can only think and never act) so they do "real men" things, i.e. drink wine. "En avoir" actually refers back to "...
user45784's user avatar
  • 564
12 votes
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et qui - how do you really understand that kind of phraseology?

You aren't missing anything. This is not standard French. It's likely that the writer started to phrase the sentence in a certain way and then changed it but didn't complete that change. For example, ...
Gilles 'SO nous est hostile''s user avatar
12 votes

When is the phrase "j'ai bon" used?

"J'ai bon ?" means "Am I right ?". Some students when they are under stress in an exam ask the teacher "J'ai bon ?" or "J'ai bon là ?" to know if they have the good answer.
Pol's user avatar
  • 281
12 votes

What is the difference between "mère" and "mère de famille"?

Mère is basically mother. Mère de famille highlights the role of a mother inside a family and as such, is more for describing your situation, like during an interview or a date. You can think of it ...
Destal's user avatar
  • 856
12 votes

Does the word 'culte' have the same negative connotations in French as in English?

Culte has no negative connotation in French. In a religious context, it just means a belief. A lieu de culte is used to name any place of worship like a church, a mosque, a synagogue, a temple, etc. ...
jlliagre's user avatar
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12 votes
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What does bien mean in this context

In this sentence, « bien » means “indeed”.
user2233709's user avatar
12 votes
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What's the meaning of "il/elle temporise" ?

All your examples showcase the propensity for writers to confuse the meaning of temporiser (to wait for a more favorable moment) with that of tempérer (to qualify, soften remarks, tone down, add a ...
ninja米étoilé's user avatar
11 votes
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"Gentillement" or "Gentiment" ?

Gentillement used to exist but is not used anymore; this spelling was removed from the Dictionnaire de l'Académie in 1932, according to the TLFi (link) Prononc. et Orth. : []. Ds Ac. 1694-1932. ...
Alexandre d'Entraigues's user avatar
11 votes
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How should I understand "des" in this sentence?

Pays is a word that has the same form in the singular and in the plural. It always has an s in the end. In : un des grands pays it is plural. And you can tell it is plural because the adjective ...
None's user avatar
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11 votes
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« un mois en "R" », ça veut dire quoi ?

This is a reference to the folk knowledge that you should only eat oysters in months that have an "R" in the name — based on the coincidence that September through April, the winter months, have "R" ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
  • 19.3k
11 votes
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"Mind" in French

If we look at the TLF we can see that tête means : A. − une partie du corps. B. − le siège de l'activité cérébrale, ou considérée du point de vue des activités intellectuelles et du psychisme. A. ...
None's user avatar
  • 61.3k
11 votes
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Qu'est-ce que ça veut dire "pour quelque chose" dans ce contexte?

It means here "he contributed to it", "he had something to do with it" yes. "y être pour quelque chose" is in fact an expression in itself which carries this meaning, so you can not really ...
Christian's user avatar
  • 128
11 votes
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histoire de se changer les idées - what exactly is this saying?

Histoire de + infinitive is a familiar phrase that means "just for the sake of". It is used to express a simple intention, where one should not look for any other purpose. J'ai été au parc,...
Greg's user avatar
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11 votes
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What is the difference between "il te faut ~" and "il faut que tu ~"?

Il faut que tu fasses la vaisselle is the standard way to say to someone that he needs to do the dishes. It can be either a direct order or strong advice (do it now) or just used to state a rule. Il ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 147k
11 votes
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When is the phrase "j'ai bon" used?

This popular spoken French expression is asking if what has just been done/said is correct or not. It comes from school teacher's usage to write Bon (for bonne réponse, good answer) in front of a ...
jlliagre's user avatar
  • 147k

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