13

There are two verbs that are homonyms and as you said they mean in English, respectively, steal and fly. But voler meaning fly is an intransitive verb, that is, it cannot be followed by a (so-called) complément d'objet (both direct or indirect). Piloter un avion, faire partie de son équipage ou être à son bord. Nous volons vers Rome. Les avions volent. Un ...


10

Like with the English "thanks to", the tone is essential to make clear what you mean with merci. I would then suggest: Plus personne ne peut sortir de chez soi, merci le coronavirus ! As per @Xi'an's comment: Plus personne ne peut sortir de chez soi, merci qui ? Merci le coronavirus ! Here is an example of use found in the Femme actuelle ...


10

That joke doesn't translate well into French because "fermer les freins" is not idiomatic in Belgium French (nor France for what I know...). So, while you probably would be understood, it will definitely sound weird and therefore something you intent as a funny remark could be misinterpreted and judged agressive. As much as I like puns, I can't ...


8

Le degré de l'équation est la puissance à laquelle la dérivée de plus grand ordre est élevée


6

It is correct French from all points of view, and it means only "I stole a plane.", so there is no problem whatever the context. If you wanted to say "I flew a plane." you'd say "J'ai piloté un avion.".


5

I'm not sure about how coach-marks differs from tooltips but I would call what you show one of: Bulle d'information Bulle informative Infobulle Note that bulle means here the usually rounded background of the text area used to show the piece of information with the triangle pointing to the location it refers like comics "speech balloons". Its ...


4

Without a context, the meaning is: I did something that made the plane fly. The chance for a plane to fly compared to the chance for a plane to be stolen essentially rules out the second interpretation. Even J'ai fait voler la voiture. would more likely mean the car took off for a moment because of you. To make the stealing more plausible, you might say ...


4

Ils sont sur le cul, ils se sont chié dessus !


4

The song wording is weird, especially the first verse: Qu'est-ce que je vais te nommer ? It looks like a calque of the English: What am I going to call/name you? but that doesn't work that way in French. The actual translation would be more like: What name am I going to mention you? Assuming the intended meaning is "what am I going to call you?&...


4

The most common way is to use the plain translation of "thanks to" and in saying it to use an intonation that will communicate the sarcastic effect, although that is not absolutely necessary, but with a neutral intonation and depending on the subject not much sarcasm might come through. Grâce au coronavirus personne ne peut quitter son habitation.


3

You could also use: Le degré de l'équation est la puissance à laquelle la dérivée la plus haute est élevée. It allows to avoid the repetition of élevée, and all mathematician readers will understand what you mean.


3

Il me semble qu'il n'y a pas de "meilleure" traduction dans l'absolu. Cela dépend du contexte. Ceci étant dit, "de là" est plus précis que "en" (si c'est de "là", ce n'est pas d'"ici"). Donc si le lieu est important, j'utiliserais "de là". J'ai tout vu! Il est tombé de là. Par contre, "en&...


3

On ne peut même plus sortir de la maison, vive la COVID-19 (ou maladie à coronavirus 2019) ! L'interjection vive1 pour l'« exclamation en l’honneur de quelqu’un, ou d’une chose dont on se félicite de la présence » (Wiktionnaire), employée sarcastiquement2 avec la désignation officielle (de l'OMS) de la maladie dont il s'agit. 1. « When used as a general ...


3

On peut trouver le terme bureau debout, ou bureau assis/debout (pour un meuble qui peut s'adapter aux deux positions). Debout me semble alors plutôt un adverbe en apposition qu'un adjectif épithète (ce n'est pas le bureau qui est debout, mais son utilisateur qui travaille debout, a fortiori aussi pour bureau assis/debout. C'est un cas proche de mange-debout, ...


2

Uncountable/generic nouns are a case where English doesn't use an article while French does. L'eau coule - Water flows. Le temps, c'est de l'argent - Time is money.


2

It is ambiguous if taken out of context; it can have two translations. 1/ I made the airplane fly. 2/ I had the airplane stolen. In « 1/ » the action can be one several sorts. It can be the supply of the necessary maintenance and fuel for the plane to be able to fly; It can be a repair that was needed; it can also be the exercise of particular piloting ...


2

The word is "nommer" (to call, to give a name). There are two other words to change. Qu'est-ce que je vais te nommer? Je vais te nommer L'amour, l'amour À la raison. L'amour et moi Nous sommes un, nous sommes un. Addition (I had forgotten about that translation) The translation icludes something that' ll be difficult to render (L'amour à la ...


2

The future of On se souvient d'eux is simply: On se souviendra d'eux. The future form with nous (nous nous souviendrons d’eux) is not incorrect but, like its present tense form nous nous souvenons d'eux, is more formal and has mostly disappeared from spoken French.


2

Pour les bureaux qui peuvent s'ajuster, les termes consacrés par les vendeurs de mobilier de bureau sont bureau réglable en hauteur ou bien bureau assis debout, voir par exemple ce que donne un moteur de recherche avec les mots: bureau ajustable. Quant au mobilier fixe, je ne connais pas de bureau à proprement parler. Il y a bien les tables hautes ou bien ...


2

En complément à la réponse de Greg, pour la première question, sur base d'une rapide recherche Google, on trouve les termes suivants, par ordre décroissant d'occurrences: bureau réglable (221k) bureau réglable en hauteur (119k) bureau debout (86k) station assis debout (80k) bureau assis debout (60k) bureau ajustable (58k) bureau debout assis (28k) poste ...


2

Side notes I find the use of “grand” rather than “gros” to convey “big” a bit out of tone for what the novel is. Perhaps there is some sort of taboo related to broadly and liberally using “gros” in written (and maybe even oral) French, I'm not sure, but in any case I wouldn't refrain from using it here. Also, I find “chose” a bit ugly in this case. It may be ...


2

“Plus de X” and “davantage de X” (where X is a noun without an article) are completely synonymous. “Plus de X” is more common. You may occasionally find people who forbid “davantage de/que” and only allow davantage as a standalone adverb, but even the very conservative Littré allows them. Note that “plus de” is pronounced [plys]: the S is not silent when ...


2

Sacoche in French Quebecois mean principaly the hand bag of a women. It can also mean a object like a sac banane, but it got a strong connotation of a feminine's article. Hearing someone to tell that to a man's bag could make me think if he wanted to make a joke.


1

From the definition of a coach-mark, since it can have a close icon or a dismissal link, it seems from this page that "marker" and "coach-mark" are synonymous. According to the explanations on this same page the simple term "marqueur" (marker), which is opposed to "info-bulle" (tooltip) can be used to translate "...


1

Il y a plusieurs formulations de cet état de chose. Le degré de l'équation est la puissance de la dérivée du plus grand ordre. Le degré de l'équation est la puissance de la dérivée qui donne son ordre. de l'équation (différentielle). Le degré de l'équation est la puissance de la dérivée qui donne l'ordre de l'équation (différentielle). Le degré d'une ...


1

Notice: Answer from a Belgian French perspective This is a tricky one. If I were to see the picture you describe and the product was labelled as "sacoche" I would probably not find it too much off. But if I had to choose only 1 word to describe it, I probably wouldn't use "sacoche" but pochette, housse, étui, sac,... Using more words you ...


1

To preserve the nice effects you might want to say this. Ils sont tous sur le cul parce qu'ils tombent (de)/(sur le) cul. (OALD) breeches short trousers/pants fastened above the knee. (The Free Dictionary) shit (one's) pants. rude slang By extension, to be very surprised. reddit Shit his britches "Britches" is an old word for an old fashioned ...


1

So it's at least in part something "that causes people to feel nervous because the ending is not known until the final moment" (Merriam Learners) and therefore anxiogène, "which creates anxiety", is one option for a negative connotation i.e. une élection hautement anxiogène. Maybe if it's construed a bit like a cliffhanger then (une ...


1

I think the expression you are looking for is "Coude à coude" referring to a race where contestant are at the same distance (there elbows are next to each others) By the way if you google it right now you will find articles about the US presidential election :)


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