New answers tagged

1

Il y a plusieurs formulations de cet état de chose. Le degré de l'équation est la puissance de la dérivée du plus grand ordre. Le degré de l'équation est la puissance de la dérivée qui donne son ordre. de l'équation (différentielle). Le degré de l'équation est la puissance de la dérivée qui donne l'ordre de l'équation (différentielle). Le degré d'une ...


2

You could also use: Le degré de l'équation est la puissance à laquelle la dérivée la plus haute est élevée. It allows to avoid the repetition of élevée, and all mathematician readers will understand what you mean.


7

Le degré de l'équation est la puissance à laquelle la dérivée de plus grand ordre est élevée


1

Sacoche in French Quebecois mean principaly the hand bag of a women. It can also mean a object like a sac banane, but it got a strong connotation of a feminine's article. Hearing someone to tell that to a man's bag could make me think if he wanted to make a joke.


1

Notice: Answer from a Belgian French perspective This is a tricky one. If I were to see the picture you describe and the product was labelled as "sacoche" I would probably not find it too much off. But if I had to choose only 1 word to describe it, I probably wouldn't use "sacoche" but pochette, housse, étui, sac,... Using more words you ...


0

As already mentioned in Laurent S.'s answer, "fermer les freins" does not exist in French. And I cannot find an equivalent to make the pun work. The correct verbs for the brakes are "utiliser" or "appuyer sur". Or more simply and more commonly, the verb "freiner". For instance, the following sentences have the same ...


10

That joke doesn't translate well into French because "fermer les freins" is not idiomatic in Belgium French (nor France for what I know...). So, while you probably would be understood, it will definitely sound weird and therefore something you intent as a funny remark could be misinterpreted and judged agressive. As much as I like puns, I can't ...


3

On ne peut même plus sortir de la maison, vive la COVID-19 (ou maladie à coronavirus 2019) ! L'interjection vive1 pour l'« exclamation en l’honneur de quelqu’un, ou d’une chose dont on se félicite de la présence » (Wiktionnaire), employée sarcastiquement2 avec la désignation officielle (de l'OMS) de la maladie dont il s'agit. 1. « When used as a general ...


4

The most common way is to use the plain translation of "thanks to" and in saying it to use an intonation that will communicate the sarcastic effect, although that is not absolutely necessary, but with a neutral intonation and depending on the subject not much sarcasm might come through. Grâce au coronavirus personne ne peut quitter son habitation.


10

Like with the English "thanks to", the tone is essential to make clear what you mean with merci. I would then suggest: Plus personne ne peut sortir de chez soi, merci le coronavirus ! As per @Xi'an's comment: Plus personne ne peut sortir de chez soi, merci qui ? Merci le coronavirus ! Here is an example of use found in the Femme actuelle ...


2

Pour les bureaux qui peuvent s'ajuster, les termes consacrés par les vendeurs de mobilier de bureau sont bureau réglable en hauteur ou bien bureau assis debout, voir par exemple ce que donne un moteur de recherche avec les mots: bureau ajustable. Quant au mobilier fixe, je ne connais pas de bureau à proprement parler. Il y a bien les tables hautes ou bien ...


2

Uncountable/generic nouns are a case where English doesn't use an article while French does. L'eau coule - Water flows. Le temps, c'est de l'argent - Time is money.


0

The meaning is close to the first one: 80% of businesses surveyed said the main cause was loss of opportunities If you look to the full report, you can see that it is not a percentage of businesses but a percentage of the total number of employees: Note de lecture : 80 % des salariés travaillent dans une entreprise où l'activité a diminué en août du fait ...


4

The song wording is weird, especially the first verse: Qu'est-ce que je vais te nommer ? It looks like a calque of the English: What am I going to call/name you? but that doesn't work that way in French. The actual translation would be more like: What name am I going to mention you? Assuming the intended meaning is "what am I going to call you?&...


2

The word is "nommer" (to call, to give a name). There are two other words to change. Qu'est-ce que je vais te nommer? Je vais te nommer L'amour, l'amour À la raison. L'amour et moi Nous sommes un, nous sommes un. Addition (I had forgotten about that translation) The translation icludes something that' ll be difficult to render (L'amour à la ...


0

On Armistice day, the French say “on se souvient d’eux”, but this is said, or occasionally written, rather informally. Also, this does not put "the emphasis on them rather than on us remembering now", in fact, the most common context is not that of "an emphasis on them" (which is apparently not part of the reality), but that of "...


2

The future of On se souvient d'eux is simply: On se souviendra d'eux. The future form with nous (nous nous souviendrons d’eux) is not incorrect but, like its present tense form nous nous souvenons d'eux, is more formal and has mostly disappeared from spoken French.


2

En complément à la réponse de Greg, pour la première question, sur base d'une rapide recherche Google, on trouve les termes suivants, par ordre décroissant d'occurrences: bureau réglable (221k) bureau réglable en hauteur (119k) bureau debout (86k) station assis debout (80k) bureau assis debout (60k) bureau ajustable (58k) bureau debout assis (28k) poste ...


3

On peut trouver le terme bureau debout, ou bureau assis/debout (pour un meuble qui peut s'adapter aux deux positions). Debout me semble alors plutôt un adverbe en apposition qu'un adjectif épithète (ce n'est pas le bureau qui est debout, mais son utilisateur qui travaille debout, a fortiori aussi pour bureau assis/debout. C'est un cas proche de mange-debout, ...


2

It is ambiguous if taken out of context; it can have two translations. 1/ I made the airplane fly. 2/ I had the airplane stolen. In « 1/ » the action can be one several sorts. It can be the supply of the necessary maintenance and fuel for the plane to be able to fly; It can be a repair that was needed; it can also be the exercise of particular piloting ...


4

Without a context, the meaning is: I did something that made the plane fly. The chance for a plane to fly compared to the chance for a plane to be stolen essentially rules out the second interpretation. Even J'ai fait voler la voiture. would more likely mean the car took off for a moment because of you. To make the stealing more plausible, you might say ...


2

“Plus de X” and “davantage de X” (where X is a noun without an article) are completely synonymous. “Plus de X” is more common. You may occasionally find people who forbid “davantage de/que” and only allow davantage as a standalone adverb, but even the very conservative Littré allows them. Note that “plus de” is pronounced [plys]: the S is not silent when ...


1

To preserve the nice effects you might want to say this. Ils sont tous sur le cul parce qu'ils tombent (de)/(sur le) cul. (OALD) breeches short trousers/pants fastened above the knee. (The Free Dictionary) shit (one's) pants. rude slang By extension, to be very surprised. reddit Shit his britches "Britches" is an old word for an old fashioned ...


0

All three are quite interchangeable. The difference between plus and davantage is mostly formality and has already been answered here: Davantage/plus - what's the difference?. Encore might suggest that's not the first time extra time has been needed for the task. Note that both plus and davantage use de temps but encore uses du temps: Il me faudrait ...


13

There are two verbs that are homonyms and as you said they mean in English, respectively, steal and fly. But voler meaning fly is an intransitive verb, that is, it cannot be followed by a (so-called) complément d'objet (both direct or indirect). Piloter un avion, faire partie de son équipage ou être à son bord. Nous volons vers Rome. Les avions volent. Un ...


6

It is correct French from all points of view, and it means only "I stole a plane.", so there is no problem whatever the context. If you wanted to say "I flew a plane." you'd say "J'ai piloté un avion.".


4

Ils sont sur le cul, ils se sont chié dessus !


1

So it's at least in part something "that causes people to feel nervous because the ending is not known until the final moment" (Merriam Learners) and therefore anxiogène, "which creates anxiety", is one option for a negative connotation i.e. une élection hautement anxiogène. Maybe if it's construed a bit like a cliffhanger then (une ...


0

An expression I hear from time to time is Se ronger les ongles jusqu'au coude This means to bite your nails up to the elbow. It is meant to be humoristic so certainly not appropriate for the US elections for Americans.


2

Side notes I find the use of “grand” rather than “gros” to convey “big” a bit out of tone for what the novel is. Perhaps there is some sort of taboo related to broadly and liberally using “gros” in written (and maybe even oral) French, I'm not sure, but in any case I wouldn't refrain from using it here. Also, I find “chose” a bit ugly in this case. It may be ...


1

I think the expression you are looking for is "Coude à coude" referring to a race where contestant are at the same distance (there elbows are next to each others) By the way if you google it right now you will find articles about the US presidential election :)


4

There are two verbs: pouvoir and causer. Each has its own tense, which might be a compound tense involving the auxiliary avoir (with some verbs, it would be être instead). “Pouvoir causer” as a whole doesn't have a tense. pourrait: conditionnel présent aurait pu: conditionnel passé causer: infinitif présent avoir causé: infinitif passé Both sentences are ...


2

You can say: Cette élection se joue sur le fil du rasoir. (on a knife-edge) Wiktionnaire: (Figuré) Se trouver dans une situation délicate dont l’issue est incertaine. La situation se complique ; je suis vraiment sur le fil du rasoir. Si les commandes ne rentrent pas, pour notre trésorerie, ce sera sur le fil du rasoir. Definition from expressio.fr: dans ...


1

Instead of the more usual "infinitif" found after "pouvoir" you find the "infinitif passé" of the verb "causer". (infinitif passé) The idea in using the "infinitif passsé" is that of an event that took place before another. The mode and tense of "pouvoir" is the "conditionnel présent". Let'...


4

I would probably use 'une élection haletante', from haleter (to pant or breathe heavily). It preserves the connotation of the election being suspenseful as well as the neutrality between the possible positive (thrilling, exciting) and negative (tense, concerning) connotations of 'nail-biting'. 'Une élection palpitante' could potentially work, although it has ...


5

L'utilisation d'un mot différent est peut-être encouragée pour distinguer les deux sens possibles. Un interprète est une personne dont c'est le métier ou l'activité, un interpréteur est un programme. On retrouve un peu la même différence entre un programmeur (personne) et un programmateur (plutôt un instrument). Pour ce qui est de la logique, l'étymologie ...


1

Sous est une préposition très courante pour exprimer une substance (souvent médicamenteuse) prise par une personne et qui agit sur son corps. Elle peut se comprendre comme "soumis à l'effet de". Ex: Je suis sous antihistaminiques Nouvelles sous ecstasy (titre d'un livre de Beigbeder) Ce patient est sous oxygène Cette préposition est donc adéquate ...


2

As a GENERAL matter, French has only a single present tense, unlike English. That means the following: Ils se cachent dans le jardin. can be: They are hiding in the garden [now] OR They hide in the garden [when they play games]. I drink coffee. = Je bois du café. can be both drink and am drinking. Here's the trick: être en train de faire quelque chose is, of ...


3

In this context passer and pass are false cognates (faux amis). The pair is a very basic one as user @Lambie remarks. passer ses examens = to sit/take/do his/her exams Cf. Réussir ses examens = to pass his/her exams. See, e.g. https://www.fluentu.com/blog/french/faux-amis-french-false-friends-cognates/ https://www.9h05.com/10-exemples-frequents-de-faux-...


1

Not a native speaker of either French or English. May be I am misunderstanding your question. Note that German, unlike English (both are Germanic languages), does not possess also a Simple Present Continuous. To emphasize what one is doing right now, in English, we use the verb “to be” and the “present participle” of the verb : I am doing (doing is the ...


7

*Sans de conneries is not correct: there is no partitive article after "sans", so for the grammar, it should be sans conneries. Yet, sans conneries is not a clear phrase in French, and I feel that the word connerie is stronger and more vulgar than the English bullshit, and does not always convey the same meaning (it derives from the word con , ...


1

To keep it simple, the pronoun en replaces a groupe nominal preceded by de unless it is a person, e.g Il parle souvent de ses aventures becomes Il en parle souvent, that's the first en. The second en is a préposition, it can usually be substituted by comme or like in English: ".... avant de la nouer en turban" which is equivalent to ".... ...


2

En is a pronoun in this case. It replaces nouns used with the preposition de, often a partitive (le partitif) pronoun. That can be a noun that takes the indefinite article de, du, de la, de l', and des. In general, when you see a form of de, it gets replaced with the pronoun en. Here, the pronoun en goes with the verb frotter + de to replace de la ...


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