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18

The phonetic value of the letter e which could represent the sounds [ә], [e] or [ɛ] has been a lasting ambiguity that has established itself over the centuries. This is an inheritance of the Latin writing system and of the French specific sound changes that occurred over the time. Various devices were used in the course of history to try to disambiguate the ...


11

Ficher can have several meanings but it is not a verb we would use very much except for the colloquial use. 1- The oldest and primary meaning of ficher is faire entrer par la pointe, it comes from Latin figere which means "to plant", "to fix". Its past participle is regular: fiché. It is not used much, I can't say why, other verbs are ...


5

Voie 2 is a complément circonstanciel de lieu. It answers to the question: Où va arriver le train ? Le train va arriver voie 2. Voie 2 can be removed or moved without breaking the sentence: Le train va arriver. Voie 2, le train va arriver. That sentence uses no preposition because voie 2 is similar to an address, here a track, just like would be a street ...


4

"Rappeler" is "calling back / calling again". So if this is the first call, use "appeler" : "Je t'appelle." Generally speaking, prepending a verb with "re-" or "r-" mean "doing the action again", like "revenir", "reprendre", "refaire", "racheter". If ...


3

Google Translate is not a dictionary. Nevertheless, mettre sur une fiche means precisely "to file". A collection of fiches is un fichier, i.e. a file. Despite the different wording, the Collins gives all meanings. The Cambridge only shows one indeed but I expect that most free online dictionaries are abridged versions of paper based ones, or only ...


3

1. La phrase suivante est-elle bonne ? Ils peuvent en trouver en faisant leurs courses aux brocantes, aux marchés aux puces, aux magasins d’occase ou aux recycleries. On ne dit pas « faire ses courses à » ou même « aller à » suivi d'un (ou plusieurs) complément(s) de lieu au pluriel (donc qui représente(nt) un type de lieu et non un lieu en particulier). ...


2

None of the above. If you mean you reply to or renew a recent call, that would be: Je te rappelle... (I call you back) If this call is unrelated to a previous one: Je t'appelle... (I call you)


2

il a commencé à jouer is the right one, I guess you could have asked any translator for that, deepl is a good one imo. The rule is: after a preposition (in this case à) verbs are always at the infinitive form


1

1 a- From what can be read at the entry for "a-", which is called more precisely a combining form (Fr : élément formant), this is not so; direction is one possibility but not the only one; there are four possibilities, including direction. (added numbers ([1°], …) are used so as to be able to refer to the part they apply to in the present section ...


1

"Rappeler" is not used for "to call" and the verb must be conjugated, it cannot be in the infinitive. When the call is going to be made some time after the person is being told they are going to be called, the present and the future can be used; there is just one exception. Nous sommes aujourd'hui vendredi, je t'appellerai/appelle ...


1

It is just an idiomatic construction that has very possibly come into being as a result of the heavy use of "arriver sur la voie x" in train stations. You can still say "arriver sur la voie deux" (ref. 1, ref. 2) . "Arriver à la voie" is not said when you are talking about trains (ref.).


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