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7

As ever with prepositions, don't expect them to map out perfectly from one language to the next. Arguments indicating the goal of a verb are marked with for in English (ask for, look for, call for, etc), but are direct objects in French, a trait inherited from Latin (and indeed from the common ancestor of English and Latin. While English developed a ...


1

In English, the present perfect (have + past participle) is used to describe present states, including states that persisted from the past to the present or the results of past actions. Thus, one cannot say, of a dead subject, he has dedicated, but one can say, I have lived here for ten years. However, French does not have an analogous tense. While the passé ...


5

The imparfait doesn't work if only because you are still alive. The passé composé is the right tense assuming you want to keep toute ma vie so you might use one of: J'ai habité aux États-Unis toute ma vie. J'ai toujours habité aux États-Unis. J'ai habité toute ma vie aux États-Unis. See Imparfait or Passé Composé: “j'étais ...


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