13

Étant né à Paris il y a 21 ans et y vivant depuis, tout mon entourage est français. Et depuis ma naissance, je peux t'assurer que jamais ne m'est venu à l'oreille le moindre bruit du fait d'une personne qui vouvoierait ses parents. Cela représente au minimum 1 000 personnes dont je suis 100% sûr qu'elles ne vouvoient pas leurs parents. Ainsi, je pense que l'...


9

Avant 1966, on disait le Notre Père soit en latin, soit en français en vouvoyant Dieu : Notre Père qui êtes aux cieux, que votre Nom... A partir de 1966 (Concile Vatican II), le Latin est abandonné et on tutoie Dieu : Notre Père qui es aux cieux, que ton Nom... La deuxième personne est utilisée car la prière s'adresse à Dieu, précédemment au ...


8

This question seems more related to social interactions than pure French language, but here are my two cents about it : Tutoyer is informal, while vouvoyer is more formal. In this example, the fact that the magistrate switches to "tu" instead of "vous" would indeed indicate a willingness to get more "personnal", closer to Meursault, as someone you know ...


8

They were not school kids but young adults in Terminale class (~18/19 years old). The vouvoiement is expected between adults who do not know each other in France1, except on forums and the web where this requirement is relaxed. While sometimes reluctant to do it, police and gendarmerie officers have been asked since 2006 by their hierarchy to use the ...


7

C'était une coutume, tout à fait normale dans la haute société à l'époque de Madame de Sévigné, que de se vouvoyer entre parents et enfants et aussi entre époux. Même de vouvoyer les enfants encore jeunes, du moins en public, les parents avaient des nurses qui s'occupaient des enfants et ne les voyaient en général qu'en public. Au XVIIe siècle, sous l’...


6

Answer about French language: not only this particular use of tu and vous is not standard, it just is not relevant. For the usage of tu and vous, see, for instance, this site or wikipedia. The app could use tu or vous, question of choice on what they want to convey, but definitely the same form in both, correct and incorrect cases. In educational contexts, ...


6

Tu used inappropriately can be interpreted as a lack of respect by certain people. It would be the equivalent of being overly friendly with a senior manager you haven't met yet. The person would probably not be insulted per se but will probably think that you do not respect their status. If the context is you being a tourist it would not be weird if you ...


6

Both are acceptable but I would suggest sticking to vous because you are addressing the message to a group of people. Regardless of whether you use tu or vous at the singular, the plural is always vous. There is absolutely nothing wrong with writing: Je dispose d'une place pour le concert de XYZ. Si vous êtes intéressés, envoyez-moi un message au ...


5

As pointed out by Luke Sawczak in the comments, most of software in French use the infinitive form for these verbs. If you're using these verbs in the context of a tutorial or a guide on how to use this software, you could use the "vous" form. If you want to convey a sense of proximity, then use the "tu" form.


5

Au 20e ou au 21e siècle, vouvoyer ses parents est perçu comme stéréotypiquement aristocratique et arriéré. Il y a encore des gens qui le font, mais ce n'est pas culturellement « normal ». C'était plus courant autrefois. Il est donc logique que le vouvoiement systématique y compris au sein de la famille proche est assez répandu dans la littérature classique. ...


4

Short answer: It depends on who you are talking to. Long answer: If you respect the person, then vous is appropriate. If the person is a stranger, then use vous. Otherwise, it is perfectly fine to use tu. In addition, using tu is not an insult; vous is just more formal and slightly more polite. Using tu is certainly not the same as "cussing someone out" in ...


4

No. The adjectives in this case follow notional or semantic, not purely grammatical agreement. The verb goes in the plural, but the adjectives go in the singular.


4

It is called "vouvoiement". There is three different ways to talk to someone: Tu, singular, second person Target: You are speaking to only one person. Context: You know this person. It is a friend, a member of your family or in some cases a colleague you work with (some people are not comfortable with it though). This isn't formal, but it is still polite ...


4

It depends the context. I would say there are 2 kinds of situations where you would use "vous": When you don't personnaly know the person When the person in front of you has an higher rank than you (at work, school, army, spiritually...). In the first case, it is ambiguous because the proximity from which you can use "tu" is subjective. So some people will ...


4

Généralement, tu peux tutoyer un supérieur si tu le connais bien, en fonction du temps passé ensemble, des sorties en dehors du travail... Ce n'est pas une faute de vouvoyer quelqu'un même s'il te tutoie. Si cela le dérangeait, il te l'aurait fait remarquer en disant quelque chose comme "tu peux me tutoyer". Mais si tu te sens mal à l'aise vis à vis de lui ...


3

It depends on your audience. If you have a software for any user, we normally use "vous", since we don't know the user and that your software may be for professionnals (where we mostly use "vous"). If your software is for children (i.e. Adibou), you can use "tu" (e.g. "Clique sur le carré", "Aide-le à retrouver son chien").


3

Le vouvoiement ne fait pas de "vous" un pluriel (sauf pour l'accord du verbe). On dira donc: Vous êtes intéressant(e). Vous êtes un bon ami. Sans mettre la marque du pluriel pour le COD. Il est difficile de donner une vérité historique car l'orthographe officielle n'a pas toujours existé: l'Académie Française date seulement du XVIIe siècle et on ...


3

Like @laurentS said for the general meaning of the tutoiement. I will clarify in this context of Camus: the sudden switching to "tu" is an attempt to get closer to convince the other, but it is in the same time an unsollicited entrance in some's privacy. The text clearly shows an act of despair / bullying, and it annoys Mersault who fakes to agree with the ...


3

There is a simple rule of thumb based on what you would call the person in question. Ex: use "Tu" when you are on a first-name basis, and "vous" if on a last-name basis. Use "Vous" for people you address by Last name (Smith, Dupont) Title (Miss, Sir, Professor) Honorific (Your Honor) Profession (President) Use "Tu" for people you address by ...


3

In the case you describe, "tu" would be far more common. Bar/cafe are places you're in to relax. Most of the time, even waiters will use "tu" even if they don't know you. "Vous" is formal and would not be used by most of the people, unless they want to seem lordy. An exception might be older people who might prefer to be "vouvoyées", even by people of their ...


3

Adding to Laurent's answer, it may also be that someone switches to tu when high on emotions. This actually happened to me recently when, during a formal but (friendly) hated discussion someone said tu parles ! ". This is not tutoiement but shows that some expressions may be influenced by emotions, yielding a short-term tutoiement which then switches back ...


3

If a French person started choosing between tu and vous randomly, then it's clear that using tu inappropriately would cause problems more often than an inappropriate vous would, and is certainly more dangerous. However, it's important to understand that using vous instead of tu can also be a problem in certain situations where less formality is expected. It ...


3

Roughly, use tu when you would be comfortable calling someone by their given name. Note that the French are more touchy about it than Quebecers (in the workplace, it's expected you'll use vous a lot more in France, whereas in Quebec you'll frequently be called tu by salespeople or waiters).


2

Unless you are yourself a kid or talking to a kid, just use vous. Nobody will ever be outraged if you do it, being too polite is never insulting. Wait for the person you are talking with to suggest using tu ( « on peut se tutoyer » ) and don't take that initiative before being well aware with the level of familiarity required. Even if you are aware, don't ...


2

"Tu" is a friendly form to say You (Friends) "Vous" is a formal form to say You (use why talking with the boss of an enterprise or someone else who is important)


2

I completely disagree with Laurent S. here: the fact that the magistrate switches to "tu" instead of "vous" would indeed indicate a willingness to get more "personnal", closer to Meursault This is only true if the "tutoiement" goes in both direction, otherwise the effect is very different. As cl-r said, both locutors are fully aware that this "...


2

C'est exactement la réaction du juge qui sort de son rôle impartial et se laisse envahir par sa croyance qui lui ordonne de combattre les hérétiques, ou au moins de les ramener sous sa coupe, qui ne peut accepter que l'Autre vive dans un monde différent du sien. Pour un juge démocratique, il se comporte comme un inquisiteur et va suivre les même procédure......


2

For a "French-of-France" (i.e. fr_fr) advert, I would stick to tutoiement for two reasons: 1) People looking for sharing a flat are usually young, so they would prefer tutoiement 2) In such an ad, you actually talk independently to each candidate(s). Usually, you will look for one or more single roommates, hence the tutoiement. If you were to search for ...


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