user45784
  • Member for 4 years, 2 months
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  • France
What does "en avoir" mean?
Accepted answer
11 votes

What Barthes says is that modern intellectuals try to be "real men" (and not men who can only think and never act) so they do "real men" things, i.e. drink wine. "En avoir" actually refers back to "...

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How to describe this type of pick up line in French?
6 votes

Du point de vue de la fille, ça s'appelle "être lourd" (sauf si vous lui plaisez, ce qui n'est que très, très rarement mon cas) ;) Blague à part, je ne pense pas qu'il y ait une expression sur ce ...

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A few questions about the French version of the Canadian national anthem
3 votes

You found jewels and flagships because fleurons is often used metaphorically to designate the most precious item of a collection (of jewels) or the best ship in a navy fleet. De foi trempée could ...

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Why is "des bas méfaits" allowed here, straying from the usual "de bas méfaits"?
3 votes

De is more formal than des. Without context, I'd say that Woman uses formal language, which is not the case for Man. Or Man considers "bas méfaits" as a kind of compound noun, thus conveying the fact ...

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How to say "May I take the quiz" in French?
3 votes

Although it may sound quite illogical since the quiz was never taken in the first place, most French students would say: "Est-ce que je peux refaire ou repasser l'interro de vendredi après les cours?"...

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La répétition d'une phrase, qu'est ce qu'elle signifie ?
3 votes

S'il avait voulu créer cette répétition, je pense qu'il aurait écrit quelque chose comme (ce n'est pas très beau, je ne suis pas poète): Si tu veux que je t'aime et que je t'aime Même si on met la ...

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Nuances between these six verbs with the meaning of "dilly-dallying"
2 votes

Tataouiner and zigonner are quebecois stuff: I've never heard any of them in France. Atermoyer is not really used anymore but the noun atermoiement is: "Cessez vos atermoiements et continuons" but ...

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How does "Attention à ne pas trop en faire" compare to "Attention à ne pas en faire trop"?
2 votes

I'd say (but it is very subjective, I must admit) that "en faire trop" has a slight tinge of "overplaying or overdramatizing something" to it whereas "trop en faire" seems to have a kind of exhausting-...

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What are three ways French cheese or "fromages" are categorized?
2 votes

I'd say "A pâte molle", "A pâte dure" et "les bleus" but I'm not an expert.

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"en passer par là" vs "en arriver là": Do they carry any nuance in this metaphorical context?
2 votes

I'd say there is a nuance: "En passer par là" implies that you need to go through something unpleasant to achieve a goal. 'En arriver là" implies that you have to resort to some drastic measure to ...

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What is the distinction between "l'esprit de l'escalier" and "l'esprit d'escalier"?
2 votes

I don't think there is a formal-vs-casual distinction per se between the two here. But again, I'd say (and I have no source for this, mind you) that the expression lost its "l'" over time. To my ...

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Is the subject-mismatch allowed in "Après s’être amusée, il lui arrive de ..."?
1 votes

I think that "il" actually replaces the infinitive subordinate clause: *"Nous ramener quelque chose lui arrive" is the idea behind the sentence. Your sentence is just fine.

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In this context, would tes or vos be more appropriate?
1 votes

You're mixing two sentences here. It's either: Arrête de regarder la télé et fais plutôt tes devoirs (ou va plutôt faire tes devoirs) or: Arrêtez de regarder la télé et faites vos devoirs.

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Correctness of “je ne connais (pas) personne”
1 votes

Surtout pas! il y aurait une double négation avec "personne".

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Use of the passé simple
1 votes

My wife is from Benin and I've never heard people there use the passé simple in everyday life. I suppose it is also true for most of French-speaking West Africa. West Africans can have more "châtié" ...

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Espérer que in the indicative imperfect + subjunctive?
0 votes

I'd say:"J'avais espéré que tu pourrais me dire..." I don't think the tense is important here but the mode is. There is something tentative and nicely polite in "I was hoping" which is rendered by the ...

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How to use the colloquial "vrai de vrai"?
0 votes

It's a noun. "Un vrai de vrai" un vrai mec, un dur, un authentique, a machoman. I think it's Pègre slang, so it can sound a bit outdated.

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Whether to include "en" in the phrases "en coûter" and "en passer par là"?
0 votes

You are on the right track; do not worry. Both your sentences are perfectly correct and very idiomatic. The third sentence is less obvious. It sounds right at first but I don't think such a sentence ...

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Irregular verbs ending with -er
0 votes

Envoyer ou renvoyer could be irregular because they are spelt j'envoie ou je renvoie in the present tense: the y is replaced by an i. All the verbs in -oyer must be deemed irregular then: dévoyer, ...

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"une dizaine de fois" vs "une douzaine de fois": Which phrasing comes more naturally to French speakers?
0 votes

I understand you are looking for colloquialisms. In this instance, "douzaine" is better if you want to express, let's say, annoyance. But what would come naturally to me is "une demi-douzaine" - j'ai ...

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