Sylvain Gadenne
  • Member for 1 year, 1 month
  • Last seen more than a month ago
  • Lausanne, Suisse
Some Iconic French Poetry?
5 votes

The others' suggestions are good ones, but just to give a different angle I would suggest poems that are taught to all pupils in French schools, which ensure everyone has heard of them. A second ...

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Translation of “surface roads”
4 votes

The concept in itself does not exist in French at all. As has been said by others, the closest translation would be "une route de plain-pied" but no French people would understand what you ...

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Does 'calcul fastidieux' convey 'tedious calculations'? (i.e. lengthy ones)
Accepted answer
3 votes

Yes it is the best word to translate "tedious". Other words could be "ennuyeux", "pénible", "déprimant", "poussif", ...

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Convey 'is raised' in mathematical context
3 votes

You could also use: Le degré de l'équation est la puissance à laquelle la dérivée la plus haute est élevée. It allows to avoid the repetition of élevée, and all mathematician readers will understand ...

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Can I "undo" the reflexive pronoun, when using a pronominal verb?
2 votes

No, you cannot really do that, as it sounds really heavy and weird. That being said, every French people would understand the meaning of your sentence, though.

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Dans quelque temps
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2 votes

That is definitely some time in the near future. Although it is not strictly defined, when hearing "dans quelque temps" I would imagine anything between a few weeks and a few quarters, ...

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Does the sentence « Il me manque 10000 euros. » have two meanings?
1 votes

Unfortunately I find the Larousse definition to be "lacking" :-) The most common usage of "manquer" is to describe something missing, starting the sentence with the pronoun "...

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Conveying the idea of "(it) speaks for itself" (i.e. sth is clear and needs no further explanation)
1 votes

As has been said by others, "parler de soi-meme" is the corresponding French structure. A couple of examples: " Ce film n'a pas besoin de résumé, l'affiche parle d'elle-même " : ...

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When transitive verbs that are not typically used pronominally are used pronominally, do they follow rules for typically pronominal verbs?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Yes, both sentences are correct. In your first example, please note your sentence means "she ate herself". If you wanted to say that you ate her, you can use the following instead: Il y ...

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present participle étant + "se verb" with past partciple? ("s'étant lancé")
1 votes

Yes, the structure is a bit complex as it merges several French grammatical concepts. First step, the structure uses the verb "lancer" in its reflexiv form, i.e. "se lancer". For ...

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Use of nous when moi is used in the subject
1 votes

The only case where you would have to repeat the "nous" would be for a self-reflecting verb. For instance, "nous nous sommes habillés" ("we dressed ourselves", or more ...

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When to use the preposition "de" after adverbs
1 votes

I would like to insist on the rules of thumbs given hereabove by Laurent S. in his comment: When something can be quantified you would (almost always) use "un peu de". Examples: un peu de ...

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How to say "I want to let my hair grow"
1 votes

"Je veux laisser mes cheveux pousser" would also work, and has exactly the same structure as the English sentence.

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Can indirect object pronouns replace indirect objects that are introduced with contre, sur, en, contre, and envers?
0 votes

Actually, in most of the sentences you gave, the words are already indirect pronouns: Je me bats contre lui. Je compte sur toi. Il est bon envers moi. Il est bon avec moi. Only in your second ...

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A question about « X est en lien avec Y. » and « X a relation avec Y. »
0 votes

First, as pointed out by LPH in his answer, the formulations « X a relation avec Y. » and « X a lien/rapport avec Y. » are slightly unusual and outdated. The other formulations « X est en lien avec Y. ...

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Forcément vs naturellement
0 votes

Naturellement and forcément have slightly different historical/etymological meanings, but nowadays the difference is so small that most people will not make the difference. In the 3 sentences you ...

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Not the other way around
0 votes

As already mentioned in Laurent S.'s answer, "fermer les freins" does not exist in French. And I cannot find an equivalent to make the pun work. The correct verbs for the brakes are "...

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