Drew
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Comment dire « fun » en français ?
5 votes

None of the alternatives mentioned by @Romain mean fun: drôle, marrant, sympa, rigolo. They mean funny, except for sympa, which means nice or similar. The French word that typically corresponds to ...

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Is there a distinction for the words "girl" and "daughter" besides from context?
4 votes

What does "besides from context" mean, if you are talking about the exact same word ("fille")? I cannot imagine what that would mean. In terms of context, however (not your question, but hoping it ...

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"Je ne veux pas d'un éléphant dans un boa": why d'un and not un?
3 votes

I'm 99% sure this means something like "I don't want an elephant inside a boa". Not really. I think it means something more like "I want nothing to do with...", rather than "I don't want...". It's a ...

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Difference between "regarder" and "voir"
3 votes

Do you understand the difference between look and see in English? If so: regarder: look, look at, or watch, depending on the context voir: see (Similar to the difference between listen or listen to ...

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L'expression « partir au bord de la mer »
2 votes

Depends on whether you mean go to sea, as in a boat, or go to the seashore or go to the seaside. In other words, it's the same difference as in English. In English, go to the sea (“aller à la mer”) ...

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What does "à" mean in this sentence?
2 votes

It means retired people, as @Spadon wrote. It may help you to think of people in retirement as an English phrase that more closely follows the French structure here, even though it is more common to ...

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Definition of "ceci fait que"
2 votes

Think of it as meaning "this has the effect that", which is almost a literal translation. "Faire" and "have the effect" have the same origin, and the latter is about the only English verb form I can ...

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La façon habituelle de dire « What does X mean? »
Accepted answer
2 votes

Que veut dire "cow" ? Que signifie le mot "cow" ? C'est quoi un "cow" ? Qu'est-ce un "cow" ? Qu'est-ce que c'est qu'un "cow" ? Un "cow", c'est quoi au juste ? Bon sang mais c'est bien sûr ! La vache ...

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"comme toujours" vs. "comme depuis toujours"
1 votes

I'd say that: Comme depuis toujours means as usual, and refers to past behavior: the current behavior resembles the typical past behavior. Comme toujours means as always, and - at least in principle -...

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Can we form question tags in French?
1 votes

I disagree with what everyone else has said so far. In my experience it is at least as common in French as in English for someone to add such a "question tag". In particular, it is common in French ...

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Garden path sentence en français
0 votes

Je ne connais pas d'expression française semblable. Mais comprenez que cette expression en anglais n'est possible que grâce à l'idiome « take someone down the garden path ». Le concept d'une telle ...

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Why is this sentence written “Les parties du jour”?
0 votes

In parts of the day, "the day" is not a particular day, such as May 30, 2014. It is the concept day -- a day in the abstract. A day - any day -- has these parts, by definition. In English we ...

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« Excusez-moi » vis-à-vis de « Pardon »
0 votes

To add to what others have said: It depends on the context and the exact phrase, not just which verb you use. Pardonnez-moi can be as serious as forgive me (for which you recognize fault) or as ...

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"Picky eaters" en français
-1 votes

Picky (about anything, not just food): pointilleux.

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