Isuka
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Most common ways of remarking something is weird, strange, or unusual?
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7 votes

C'est bizarre or c'est étrange are generally the two most used expressions to describe that something is weird. I wouldn't say that one of those is way more used than the other. For instance, to say : ...

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How to say "this early" as in "I have never been this early" in French?
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6 votes

I have never been this bad would be translated like this : Je n'ai jamais été aussi mauvais. I have never been is translated as "Je n'ai jamais été", as you said. This bad is translated there by ...

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How do you say "would you" in French?
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6 votes

What you want to express in your sentence is something you would like, a wish. We're talking about a possibility. In French, you would translate would you with verbs in a conditional tense expressing ...

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Why is the "belle-sœur" Belle?
6 votes

Beau and belle are originally coming from the Middle Ages. There were at this time specific terms to describe the son-in-law (fillastre), father-in-law (parastre), mother-in-law (marastre). Similarly,...

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Why does “Je ne fais que regarder” mean what it does?
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5 votes

"Ne faire que ça" can literally be translated as "To just do that", or "To only be doing that". You use this form to state that the targeted person is only doing one specific thing. You could see ...

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"se prendre en main(s)": Singular or Plural?
5 votes

According to the Larousse, se prendre en main should stay in singular: Prendre en main quelque chose, quelqu'un, s'en occuper pour redresser une situation.

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Can "aimer" be used as "like" or does it solely mean "love" when the direct object is a person (e.g. J'aime mon enfant.)?
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4 votes

Objects If I want to say that I really like an object, I will use "adorer": J'adore mon ordinateur, il est très puissant ! If I want to simply say that I like an object, I will use "aimer": J'...

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Utilisation du pronom "son" dans le sens général
4 votes

Son renvoie dans ce contexte à toute personne qui lirait le titre de l'article. Il permet de ne pas s'adresser à une personne en particulier, mais bien à toute personne qui pourrait lire cet article ...

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Y a-t-il quelqu'un qui prononce "sac" différemment de "sacs" (= "sâc")?
3 votes

Parlant le français depuis toujours et ayant vécu dans différentes régions avec des gens utilisant des accents plus ou moins différents et prononcés, je n'ai jamais entendu quelqu'un prononcer ...

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The phrase "pour autant"
3 votes

Pour autant means that it's not because something is happening that something else is happening too. In this sentence, it is said that it is not because people are not fighting that people feel safe. ...

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What is the difference between "On n'y connaissait pas grand-chose" and "On ne connaissait pas grand-chose" ?
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3 votes

y, which is a pronoun, will there refer to a specific topic, while the second sentence is more vague. On parle beaucoup de technologies. On n'y connaissait pas grand chose à l'époque. In this ...

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“No-brainer” as a noun in French
2 votes

I think the best would simply be to use the concept of "simplicité" or "facilité". Comment devrais-je assurer la stabilité du montage ? C'est simple, utilise une queue d'aronde ! C'est ...

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Work in progress translation
2 votes

It doesn't sound natural for me to say that I'm "un travail en cours" if I am talking about me being a work in progress. The closest I could think of in French would be to say that I'm working on ...

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Translation of "go to class"
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2 votes

Even though it might sound incorrect, the best way to translate this sentence would be the last sentence: Je dois aller en classe dans dix minutes. Do note though that in France, we usually do not ...

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How do you colloquially express "Who am I to decide who you date?" in French?
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2 votes

The translation for this is nearly literal in French. We would say, the same way as in English: Qui suis-je pour décider avec qui tu sors?

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Heel over (ship) in French
2 votes

"To hell over" would be best translated as gîter, which is a French verb to describe a boat which is tilting on a side: (Marine) S'incliner sur un bord (en parlant d'un bateau), avoir de la ...

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La comparaison quantitative?
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2 votes

Quand vous lisez ou entendez cette phrase, la personne veut souvent affirmer que A vaut la moitié du prix de B, ou numériquement Prix(A) = ½ * Prix(B). Dans la même idée, il se pourrait que vous ...

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Société vs entreprise
2 votes

I think the best way to translate a company in french would be to use une entreprise. This term is the most general one to describe a company in France. Also, une société is a bit more specific than ...

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How should I understand the grammatical property of "soit" in this sentence?
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2 votes

In this context, you shouldn't just take the word soit by itself, but the expression soit... soit, that you can translate as either... or. So in this sentence, we want to say that the ships that he ...

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How should I understand "tout" in "par les faits tout simples"
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2 votes

The word tout, placed in front of a name or an adjective, will allow to accentuate the meaning of the word. You could replace it by the word vraiment, which means really: Par les faits vraiment ...

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Doit-on exprimer la volonté/le souhait avec « Je veux » ou « Je voudrais » ?
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2 votes

Il n'y a pas forcément de règle plus précise, néanmoins « je voudrais » est beaucoup plus poli. « Je veux » donne l'impression que vous donnez un ordre à la personne à qui vous exprimez votre souhait. ...

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In French, how to say "a face guy"?
1 votes

I would translate it as "un homme superficiel", which pretty much describes the idea of a "face" guy: a man only looking into the physical characteristics of his potential date.

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« Ça m’apprendra à + infinitif » : Should this expression always be used ironically?
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1 votes

In such a case, I think I would say: Ça m'apprendra à boire trois bouteilles de champagne. You are totally correct. In such contexts, using this formulation is ironical nearly all the time. Or, at ...

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Futur simple, proche, or antérieur with "quand"
1 votes

None of the above sentences would actually work. You should combine future simple and futur antérieur there. The event of going out will happen after the event of finishing the work. That's the point ...

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How to translate track and rail in French?
1 votes

You are indeed correct in both your statements. A track is translated most of the time by une voie ferrée. The error would be to translate it as chemin de fer, which is itself composed of one or more ...

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Shortening subclause with "bien que"
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0 votes

The sentence would totally be correct this way. Although, you will probably see the first sentence more often than you will see the second one.

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Why "de" in "J'estime que c'est de sa faute"
0 votes

de is not necessary in the sentence. The good way to say the sentence would be to simply say: J'estime que c'est sa faute. This formulation has been used for instance by Victor Hugo's character in ...

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Preposition in "venir + verb"
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0 votes

Came to fix can indeed be translated in est venu réparer, but also as est venu pour réparer. Both are correct, making your two first sentences correct. You can either use the one or the other to ...

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