MorganFR
  • Member for 5 years, 9 months
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La différence entre "Je peux t'en prêter 5$" et "Je peux te prêter 5$"
Accepted answer
18 votes

"Je peux t'en prêter 5$" n'est pas correct, mais "je peux t'en prêter 5" l'est, et implique que l'unité a été évoquée avant. Par exemple : "Peux-tu me prêter 10$ ? — Non, mais je peux t'en prêter 5." ...

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Are "être propriétaire de" and "être la propriété de" really the best translations of "to own" and "to be owned by" ?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Just like in English ("to own, "to belong", "to be the property of, "to possess" etc.), possession can be expressed in many ways in French. The best way to translate "to own" in French is "posséder" (...

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Wooden laundry clip
Accepted answer
4 votes

On appelle ça une "pince à linge" (en bois si tu veux le préciser) et quelques fois, on utilise aussi "épingle à linge". Une pince ou épingle à linge est un objet destiné à maintenir des vêtements ...

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Usage of "baiser"?
4 votes

Most of the time, everyone will think of the dirty word, unless it's in well-known expressions, like "baiser la main" or the noun "un tendre baiser" or if it is used in texts using elevated language ...

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How do you say "What is the dragon holding" in french
Accepted answer
4 votes

I am not quite sure what you mean. If you mean what the dragon is actually holding, like a pearl in this picture, then you would say "Que tient le dragon ?" or "Qu'est-ce que le dragon tient ?" ...

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Help with French Rebus
3 votes

The berry is called "Houx", and the cow says "meuh" (it doesn't say anything in particular, it's just the sound of a cow in French, same as "Moo" in English).

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What is the rule behind the use of "de" in this sentence?
2 votes

"de" followed by an infinitive usually just means "to + verb". Of course, "de" has other purposes (e.g. property "le chat de ma tante"), but they're usually not followed by an infinitive.

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Is "variété" used to refer to music?
1 votes

"Variété" can indeed be used to refer to French songs (Variété française), but first and foremost, it's the French equivalent of "variety" : "Une variété de légumes" ou "Il n'y a pas beaucoup de ...

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Is this a correct usage of the conditional past perfect?
1 votes

I would change the previous sentences slightly. I'd much rather say "Je l'aurais eu, sans toi pour toujours tout ruiner !" So "pour" instead of "à" and the order of the next words makes more sense. ...

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Le mot « avoir », peut-il signifier « manger » ?
0 votes

Dans la phrase "j'ai eu de la pizza", le sous-entendu contextuel est "J'ai eu de la pizza à manger", mais bien sûr cette phrase est trop lourde. De plus le fait de dire "de là" et non pas "une" ...

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How do you translate something like "I have nothing to work with" in French?
-1 votes

Your keyword in this case is "lequel" and "qui". "I have things to work with" translates to "J'ai quelque chose avec lequel travailler" or "j'ai quelque chose pour travailler" ("I have something with ...

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The French word "Or" (but not meaning gold)
-4 votes

"Or" is a synonym of "cependant, pourtant, toutefois", which means indeed "However". Of course, i mean "However" not as in "However you want", but "However, I am...". It is not particularly elegant, i ...

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