Nico Mezeret
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Signification de « où qu'œil fût »
1 votes

où qu'œil fût can be literally translated to "wherever an eye was", and is a dated way to say "everywhere".

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Meaning of a phrase, with focus on the word “titine”
1 votes

This is difficult to answer without context - but I have heard 'titine' be used to refer to a dummy (British English) or pacifier (American English). It is a contracted form of une tétine

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Translation of “caught in the act”?
24 votes

Another possible translation is: Pris la main dans le sac Literally means caught with the hand in the bag, but is most often translated as "caught red-handed". While not colloquial, it is ...

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Doesn't the phrase "avoir les moyens de" sound ambiguous here?
1 votes

This is indeed ambiguous, for the reason you have highlighted. 'Avoir les moyens' is so commonly used to talk about financial affordability that using when talking about money almost imposes that ...

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"T'as de ces mots" ?
0 votes

As Circeus mentioned, it is an expression of sarcasm, which literally translates to "You've got such words". A reasonable English equivalent could be: A diversion? Some word you've got for it!

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What exactly is an « espèce de perspective »
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6 votes

"une espèce de" is often used to the same effect as the English "a kind of", "a sort of", or even "something like" In this case, formant comme une espèce de perspective could indeed be translated ...

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Difficulty with translation for "We like; they like"
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2 votes

Using 'on' as the first person plural has become very common in spoken French, so common that you would be hard pressed to find anyone actually using 'nous' in conversation. 'Nous' is still however ...

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Using both « on {we} » and « on {they} » in a single sentence
0 votes

The second 'on' here doesn't refer to "someone/they". I believe it is what is called "un pronom impersonnel", in the same way that "il pleut" does not refer to anyone: it is used when the action has ...

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Une nuance entre « attendre de qqn que » et « s'attendre à ce que qqn »
Accepted answer
2 votes

There is a slight difference: Vous ne pouvez pas attendre des pacifistes qu'ils nous obéissent. means You can not expect of the pacifists to obey us while Vous ne pouvez pas vous attendre à ...

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How to express "would (do)" – to talk about what used to happen regularly in the past
1 votes

If you're trying to convey the idea that this would happen regularly, you could use the following construct: avait l'habitude de + infinitif which would translate literally as "had the habit" but ...

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"Je ne comprends que lorsque" is “ne” the “ne explétif” here?
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2 votes

The ne ... que construct expresses a negative meaning in the same way that "nothing but" does in english. For instance, Je ne mange que des légumes means "I eat nothing but vegetables" Your ...

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The usage of "le pays de..."
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13 votes

This expression would be used in french to describe a place where something is plentiful, or from where something originates. Off the top of my head an example is France sometimes being referred to ...

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Expressions for Either Either?
6 votes

You could use C'est du pareil au même The meaning is basically equivalent to saying "there is no difference".

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What's the word for a conjugation dictionary?
4 votes

As per @MakorDal 's answer, it is very common to refer to such books as un bescherelle However, I believe the technical term for them is simply: un dictionnaire de conjugaison

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What is a carton of cigarettes in French?
3 votes

Yes that's correct. A pack of cigarettes is: un paquet de cigarettes (m) And a carton of cigarettes is: une cartouche de cigarettes (f)

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How to say: When are we meeting?
Accepted answer
3 votes

A natural way to say it could be: Quand est-ce qu'on se retrouve? This is more informal but probably suited to the context if you're asking this to a friend.

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What is the french for 'A beautiful love' Story from a young girl`s point of view? Is it 'Belle Amour" ?
1 votes

Amour being a masculine noun, you should use 'bel amour' regardless of context.

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Why is it necessary to put « de » after « rien », but not after « pas »?
Accepted answer
6 votes

When you say « Tu n'as pas perdu cette capacité. » you are expressing a binary concept, you either have or have not lost the ability. Hence, the de is not necessary. In English, you would say: you ...

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Which verb is used to translate the "return" when returning an item for a refund?
5 votes

Having worked in retail in France, the word for a return is in fact retour, as in Je m'occupe des retours However, you would not use the verb retourner, but indeed rapporter, as in Rapportez ...

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What is the difference in meaning between "se laisser + infinitif" and "se faire + infinitif"?
2 votes

In a broader sense, « se laisser faire » is a verb used when a person is passive about something that is happening to them. Je me laisse faire porter = I am letting someone carry me. Se faire + ...

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Afterthought expressions other than "d'ailleurs" to mean "I might add"?
2 votes

You could potentially use Soit dit en passant which is an idiomatic expression roughly equivalent to 'I might add'. The literal translation is: Be said in passing

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Why is there an "en" in "Personne n'a écrit un livre sur comment en lire"?
7 votes

You have correctly identified the usage of en in your cereal example, like in the following: J'ai acheté des céréales car je mange beaucoup de céréales becomes J'ai acheté des céréales car j'en ...

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"Que devrions-nous le baser dessus" or "Que devrions-nous le baser sur"?
12 votes

I would personally say: Sur quoi devrions-nous le baser? The two phrasings you have suggested seem incorrect to me.

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Is there a colloquial phrase for a brash, over-confident person?
3 votes

"Il se la pète" is quite a common colloquial idiom for an arrogant person.

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La « boîte à lettres » ou la « boîte aux lettres » ?
8 votes

Personellement, ayant vécu en France et en Belgique, je dirais que 'boîte aux lettres' est bien plus commun que 'boîte à lettres'. En effet, les sites suivants ont l'air de favoriser cet usage aussi: ...

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Comment dire l'expression anglaise « Who wouldn’t? » en français ?
1 votes

Another option with a slightly different meaning would be: A qui le dis-tu? This literally means "Who are you telling?", but can be used in French if you are in the same situation as the person ...

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How to say: How does he look like? Happy, sad?
1 votes

I think most French people would say: "Il a l'air de quoi?", or more formally: "De quoi a-t-il l'air?". This could however be interpreted as pertaining more to the physical appearance of the person. ...

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Une hypothèse ou non ?
4 votes

The two options you have are: Tu me diras vendredi si tu as besoin de mon aide samedi. You can tell me on Friday if you need my help Saturday Tu me diras vendredi si tu auras besoin de mon ...

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"Il était" and "Ce n’était que" in Perrault's Barbe-Bleue
Accepted answer
4 votes

'Il était une fois' is the french equivalent of 'once upon a time'. The il doesn't refer to anything and is used in a general sense, like in 'il pleut' (it's raining). 'Ce n'était que', on the other ...

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Why are the words poison and poisson so similar?
Accepted answer
21 votes

I would say this is accidental. The word 'poisson' comes from the Latin piscem, meaning fish, while 'poison' comes from 'potion' which itself originates from potio, also Latin but meaning beverage.

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