2

There are some books. I have better ones.

Il y a quelques livres. J'en ai quelques-uns de meilleurs.

I have good books and also some better ones.

J'ai de bons livres et aussi quelques-uns de meilleurs.

I made up these (rather contrived) sentences myself. Are the translations correct? And also:

I have good books and also some other ones.

J'ai de bons livres et aussi [?].

Should [?] be 1) quelques-uns d'autres; 2) d'autres; or 3) quelques autres?

Thanks in advance!

2

Yes, this is a tough one for English speakers.

Perhaps the most idiomatic way is to use the pronoun en or autre(s) itself:

There are some books. I have better ones.
Il y a quelques livres. J'en ai (d'autres) qui sont encore meilleurs.

I have good books and also some better ones.
J'ai de bons livres ainsi que d'autres qui sont encore meilleurs.

Notice that in the first one, since you provided a verb, there's something for en to easily attach to. This is preferable and so d'autres becomes optional. But in the second one, the two phrases are coordinated and there is no second verb, so there's not an obvious place to put en. Hence we need to insist on d'autres.

For your last sentence, note that in English I hear the sentence as a little tongue-in-cheek. When we contrast "good ones" vs. "other ones" we're playfully avoiding saying whether the other ones are worse, better, or equivalent, and that polite avoidance kind of avoids saying it's worse. Hence there's something unsaid and that usually makes direct translation harder.

In this instance, without a particular way of qualifiying or contrasting the other books, I think I would simply repeat the noun — but only to clarify, not because it's strictly necessary:

I have good books and also some other ones.
J'ai de bons livres ainsi que d'autres (livres).

With a longer noun phrase that you don't want to repeat in its entirety (e.g. with a relative clause), you can choose a key word to repeat.

8
  • 1
    D'accord avec @Zéhontée, Il faut remanier la phrase. Qui en sont meilleurs ne passe pas ici. S'ils sont meilleurs, c'est aussi qu'ils sont bons. Je dirais peut-être: J'ai de bons livres, et même quelques-uns de très bons. – jlliagre Mar 5 at 16:33
  • 1
    @jlliagre réf: « Qui en sont des/de meilleurs ? Avec des ça donnerait parmi je me dis finalement ? ». La personne admet que les phrases sont contrived. Mon commentaire n'est pas clair, la phrase J'ai de bons livres ainsi que d'autres qui en sont meilleurs est incomplète il me semble mais récupérable avec le déterminant, mais on tombe sur un écueuil. La phrase J'ai de bons livres ainsi que d'autres qui en sont DE meilleurs marche, de meilleurs que ceux qui sont bons... Avec DES, ça marche pour moi aussi mais avec un registre oral. Sinon des meilleurs donne parmi, soutenu. – baie d'euzellecité Mar 6 at 2:59
  • 1
    @ZéhontéeBonteuse Oui, le fait que la phrase soit contrived n'aide pas à trouver une correspondance. Avec de/des, c'est meiux mais j'ai encore du mal à trouver ça idiomatique. En me creusant un peu la tête, j'arrive à : J'ai trois bons romans à vous proposer aujourd'hui. D'autres qui en sont de meilleurs me seront livrés demain. – jlliagre Mar 6 at 13:36
  • 1
    @Luke Oui, sans le en et en faisant abstraction de la logique douteuse, la phrase est idiomatique ...ainsi que d'autres qui sont meilleurs. – jlliagre Mar 6 at 19:15
  • 1
    You can overcome the logic problem by adding encore : J'ai de bons livres ainsi que d'autres qui sont encore meilleurs. – jlliagre Mar 6 at 21:04
1

We say:

j'en ai des meilleurs;
j'en ai d'autres meilleurs;
or
j'en ai des plus intéressants (more interesting)

des: means there is more than one, otherwise it would be (J'en ai un meilleur) for (I have a better one)

1
  • 1
    Note that des plus intéressants is ambiguous. – jlliagre Mar 6 at 19:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.