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3

Cela dépend d'abord de la compétence du lecteur en matière de prononciation ancienne: s'il ne connaît pas les règles anciennes de prononciation, il n'y a aucun risque qu'il les utilise. Son choix reste donc soit de prononcer comme il lit, soit de prononcer comme si le texte était écrit en français moderne. En l'espèce, il me semble que le -oi- ne se ...


4

I'm no expert in old French so I can't tell you if we should, but we'd definitely pronounce it as it is written, but following the pronunciation rules of modern French. So "déchiroit" would be pronounced as "déchiroit" and "entrez" as "entré". That's what a native would say naturally, but I have no idea if that's how they should. I say "would" because it's ...


3

The four typical nasal vowels are /œ̃, ɔ̃, ɛ̃, ã/ as in un bon vin blanc. In what is called Parisian French, /œ̃/ has been absorbed into /ɛ̃/, leaving only three distinct nasals. Hence, brun sounds like brin and so on. And yup, it affects un, which is otherwise /œ̃/, not /ã/. You don't need to emulate this pronunciation. You can if you want, but it ...


4

The fact a word ending with a consonant is followed by a word starting with a vowel is a requirement for a liaison to exist but not sufficient. This rules out any liaison in: Je suis très sociable. Neither the final s of suis, not the final one of très are pronounced. That doesn't mean ending consonants are never pronounced in French. There are many ...


0

It is pronounced, but only in those cases when a liaison is required and then its pronunciation is not the expected one (/s/) but /z/. Je suis allé dans ce magasin. /ʒə sɥizale dɑ̃…/ The liaison is required before vowel sounds but not before semi-vowels sounds (/j/, /ɥ/, /w/). (« […] généralement, en français, les semi-voyelles ne donnent pas lieu à ...


1

Here is a transcription which, I think, corresponds to the real pronunciation. Try it at high and low speeds.                                          &...


3

In many accents of French, the letter "o" has two pronunciations that can be written in IPA as [o] and [ɔ]. Neither vowel is the same as the vowel in the French word la, which is transcribed in IPA as [a]. Neither vowel is the same as English "toe" either. The English word "toe" tends to be pronounced as a diphthong (or gliding vowel) that ends with a sound ...


2

Depending on the accent of the speaker, the two ways can sound really different. I live in a region where we emphasize a lot our vowels, and the o's in Science Po and Politique are definitely pronounced in different ways. In Science Po, the O is closed, and the phonetic symbol is [o]. In Politique the O is open, and the phonetic symbol is [ɔ]. Info and ...


2

I'll say that the "po" of "sciences politiques" and "sciences po" sounds the same in french [pɔ]. Maybe you think that it's sound differently because in "sciences po" you finish your word on an "o" sound, so you may perceive the pronunciation of this o as if it were emphasized.


0

Both should not sound the same, but it is indeed often the case. As an example I will take what is probably the most common occurrence of words ending in -ai, the future tense: Je serai à l'heure au rendez-vous J'aurai des vêtements de rechange In these cases, it should be pronounced a bit like "é", but indeed there's a tendency to pronounce it "è". ...


1

The matter of "é" vs. "è" is time-dependent and accent/region-dependent. In the south of France, many occurences of "è" are changed to "é". In the north, the difference is more marked, but the various ways of spelling do not necessarily map to a single pronunciation, although 'ai' does map to "è" in all cases I can think of. This is not the case for "...


2

These two pronunciations are both of mainstream and standard. and these dictionaries also show standard ones. Source: TLFi-> heureux


2

They are all actual existing variants. They do not prevent understanding so any of them can be used. See also: Are "œ" and "eu" pronounced the same in Parisian French?


0

I would recommend this: Il est bel et bon, commère, mon mari. => Il è bèl e boN, komèr, moN mari Hey, tattletale, my husband is nice and good Il estoit deux femmes toutes d'ung pays. => Il étè dö fam tut d'öN pé-i There were two women in the village Disant l'une à l'aultre - "Avez bon mary?" => dizaN l'ün a l'otr : avé boN mari? asking the other: "got a good ...


4

For the pronunciation I encourage the use of Google Translate, set language as French, type the text and click on the speaker icon. It's actually pretty good at giving an accurate pronunciation. Now, the text you study is written in Old French (kinda like the Modern English of Shakespeare), so some words are written in a way that evolved with time. Yet, ...


1

This O can be and is pronounced one way or another (and all shades of O in between) without any risk of misunderstanding.


0

Your question is of the same nature as this one and the answer too, I believe: Pronunciation of “au” in restaurant . Briefly, there is a main stream pronunciation (ɔ) and a variant (o); I think that the first clip is not [ɔ] but instead that it is [o]. Personally, I use for "possible" the o pronunciation you can hear in this first audio clip and it seems I ...


2

La différence s'entend entre le "eu" et le "ou" deux ans [dø] / douze ans [duz]. S'il a un doute, l'interlocuteur demande de confirmer. Il arrive aussi (si le contexte le permet, quand il s'agit d'une date approximative par exemple) que l'on dise "deux-trois ans" ou "douze-treize ans" et dans ce cas il n'y a plus de doute.


4

Il n'y a pas d'autre méthode que l'entraînement à l'écoute du français. Nous distinguons en général facilement les voyelles eu et ou, mais une oreille habituée à d'autres phonèmes pourra avoir des difficultés à le faire.


1

There is a definite difference between those two sounds, unless the locutor is pronouncing them in a very slack fashion. The phonetic vowel corresponding to "eu" in "deux" is pronounced "ø". Here is a series of pronunciations across France: https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/deux#Prononciation; that'll give you an idea of the allowed allophonic variations. The ...


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